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Emily Dickinson

poem information
by

Mckenzie Gordon

on 21 April 2010

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Transcript of Emily Dickinson

Her Extraodinary Life Emily Dickinson An american Poet By: Mckenzie Gordon
Emma Verbruggen
Andrea Lusczakoski
Madison Schweikhart
Anita Ivezaj Born 1830 in Massachusetts and lived with family She kept herself isolated, had many
struggles and never married. Her inspiration was her
bottled up feelings. Only 7 of her poems were
published before her death.
The rest were published
after she died in 1866. People were suspicious
of her relationship with
her brother's wife... 1800 Amherst Academy
and
Mount Holy Oke Love Poem Not with a club is the heart broken,
Nor with a stone;
A whip so small you could not see it.
I've known

To lash the magic creature
Till it fell,
Yet that whip's name too noble
Then to tell

Magnanimous of bird,
By boy descried
To sing unto the stone
Of which it died

Life Poem We never know how high we are
Till we are called to rise;
And then, if we are true to plan,
Our statures touch the skies.

The heroism we recite
Would be a daily thing,
Did not ourselves the cubits warp
For fear to be a King Nature Poem
(close reading) Two butterflies went out at noon
And waltzed above a stream,
Then stepped straight through the firmament
And rested on a beam;

And then together bore away
Upon a shining sea,-
Though never yet, in any port,
Their coming mentioned be.

If spoken by the distant bird,
If met in either sea
By frigate or by merchantmen,
Report was not to be. statures:the height of something or human cubits warp:"cubits" is a unit of measure and
in this poem cubits warp refers to humans limiting,
twisting, bending, or "warping" our full potential
to acheive things. Two butterflies went out at noon
And waltzed above a stream,
Then stepped straight through the firmament
And rested on a beam;

And then together bore away
Upon a shining sea,-
Though never yet, in any port,
Their coming mentioned be.

If spoken by the distant bird,
If met in either sea
By frigate or by merchantmen,
Report was not to be. Nature Poem Speaker: Emily Dickinson Tone: The author feels lonely after seeing two people she loves leave her. Mood: Starts out peacful and happy, but turns into gloomy and lonely. Imagery:Good description of the butterflies and their actions in the beginning. Theme: People fall in love and start their new lives together. Eventually they become distant from the people that may have been important to them earlier. Symbol: The two butterflies
symbolize two people who
fell in love and started
their new life together. interpretation: interpretation: This poem tells us that a heart is not broken by something physical but rather by something emotional. The feeling of love is magical until it is lost. Talking about the lost love brings too much pain so it is easier to forget and move on. This poem shows how we do not know how much we are capable of until we are called upon. And then if we succeed we receive confidence and knowledge of how much we really can acheive. Many more people would show heroic traits if we did not shoot ourselves down or have so much fear of responsibility and making mistakes. Speaker: Emily Dickinson
teaching us a lesson Theme: We do not truely know what we are capable of until we are called upon to do so and succeed. Speaker: Emily Dickinson Theme: When a heart is broken it takes time for it to mend. Bold Technique: The Dash

- -Interruption/change in
thought

-Substitute for a
colon (:) semicolon (;)
or ellipsis (...)

-To add emphasis LESBIAN Figurative language:
"spoken by the distant
bird"= personification A
B
C
B

D
E
F
E

G
E
H
E Works Cited
Dickinson, Emily. Collected Poems. Barnes and Noble, 1993. Print.
Dickinson, Emily. Poems. Book Sales, 2002. Print.
Dickinson, Emily. Selected Poems. Ann Arbor Media Group, 2003. Print.
Campbell, D. "Common Questions on Emily Dickinson." Common Questions on Emily Dickinson. WashingtonStateUniversity,16Sept.2008.Web.18Apr.2010. http://www.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/common.html.
"EmilyDickinson."Wikipedia.Web. 16 Apr. 2010. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_dickinson>.
SailBlogs.Web.16Apr.2010.: <http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.sailblogs.com/member/thewanderer/images/emilydickinson.gif&igrefurl=http://www.sailblogs.com/member/thewanderer/%3FxjMsgID%3D110873&usg=__IquFiOw5SGw8lb08ZqhhGhwP0wc=&h=425&w=327&sz=68&hl=en&start=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=LxHvQfBm40PSdM:&tbnh=126&tbnw=97&prev=/images%3Fq%3DEmily%2Bdickinson%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26tbs%3Disch:1>.
www.google.com/images Google
She died alone in
her house with no
family to support
her in 1866.
Full transcript