Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Chekhov's "The Lady with the Toy Dog"

No description
by

Braxton McLean McLean

on 30 October 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Chekhov's "The Lady with the Toy Dog"

Chekhov's "The Lady With the Toy Dog"
Presented by Curtis Reep and Braxton McLean

Setting
The story takes place mainly in Moscow, Russia.
The setting, even when its not given a huge presence in the story, gives off a feeling of depression or monotonous feeling, giving a good focus on the story and description of feelings.
Symbolism
Characters:
Conflict
Gomov, a married man, has come to despise his wife over time, and has cheated on her continuously. In the midst of this, he finds interest in the woman, who is later discovered as Anna, with a "toy" dog. They meet, talk, and make friends with each other, but she is also married, bringing on the conflict of character vs. character, and a large morality problem with this.
Dimitrich Gomov
A married man who despises his wife, and has come to occasionally despise other women because of her. He escapes his family life by staying at the local pub and bank. He also comes to find interest and eventually love in "lady with the toy dog."
Anna Sergneyvna
Quiet and reserved lady, who does indeed own a small dog, and does not truly know or love her husband, and stays with him as she does not know what else she would or could do. She comes to find love in Gomov, but feels as though she is doing wrong, cheating on her husband, and feels terrible and a sinner.
Themes and motifs
A large theme throughout this is the portrayed Immoral love, and Gomov's change of attitude towards women. Gomov doesn't even feel guilty cheating on his wife, but instead feels sad that he has no one to talk to about the lady Anna.
One motif throughout the story is communication, or lack thereof. Throughout many of Chekhov's stories, the ability to communicate is often stressed, just like how Gomov feels he can't talk to anybody about his situation, or how he is isolated from Anaa, not wanting to cause trouble.
Other
Author
Considered to be an artist that went away from the ideas of realism, highly criticized at times by peers, and was not always the kindest to his fellow writers. He was very blunt, but in his writings, at times, he let the imagery get the upper hand and describe unrealistic realities.
The presentation of belongings is a common symbol showed throughout the story, vanity items, ranging from clothes to food and even travel and communication methods show the social status and wealth of these characters. Like how Gomov an just travel to where Anna has returned to on a whim, the extram money had to be there.
Tone
Throughout this story, you as the reader experience the feeling of ambiguity, in both the character and the events happening around him. This is shown when he does not know what to do when Anna had to move back to her home, and he was very confused and uncertain of what he should do.
http://go.galegroup.com/ps/retrieve.do?sgHitCountType=None&sort=RELEVANCE&inPS=true&prodId=LitRC&userGroupName=monr27762&tabID=T001&searchId=R1&resultListType=RESULT_LIST&contentSegment=&searchType=BasicSearchForm&currentPosition=9&contentSet=GALE%7CH1420042859&&docId=GALE|H1420042859&docType=GALE&role=LitRC
Chekhov's motives and general public relations are critiqued throughout this document, and also showing his advancement away from Russian realism.
Full transcript