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Copy of English

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by

Ana Queiroz

on 17 November 2013

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Transcript of Copy of English

Quantifiers
Examples of quantifiers
Examples of quantifiers
Some
Several, a few and a little
General Use:
To
suggest
an indefinite quantity but not a large amount.
To introduce
new information
.
In the
subject of a clause.
In offers even though the sentence is a
question
.
In
requests.
Types of nouns
Much, many and a lot of
Many drinks
Thanks for listening!
Quantifiers
After the party…

In the end,
few
people came. I had
little
time to prepare the invitations, so maybe that’s why.



Difficulties for learners
Micro-teaching activity
Meaning
Enough
Vanessa Ferreira and Lúcia Cadilhe
A lot of
Every
All
Few
Some
No
Both
Either
Several
Each
Another
Any
What are quantifiers?What do they do?
"I’ve got a lot of ideas for my birthday party!"

Where do they come in sentences?
“We hired many enterprising people.”
"They didn’t have any very good ideas."
“She’s got some thoughts on that.”
Where do they come in sentences?
“She’s got
some
thoughts on that.”
(
before nouns
)
“We hired
many
enterprising people.”
(
before adjective+noun
)
"They didn’t have
any
very good ideas."
(
before adverb+adjective+noun
)
How do we choose quantifiers?
1. Give me a few book, please.


2. He took a little drinks and left.


3. I understood that he had another interest in that, so I changed the subject.

Singular nouns
:
another book
Whether the main noun in the noun phrase is countable (singular or plural) or uncountable limits our choice of quantifier.
Plural nouns
:
a few drinks
Uncountable nouns
:
a little interest
Can you pass me the pens?

Can you pass me some pens?

Can you pass me a few pens?
Meaning determines whether we choose a quantifier instead of an article, and which of the
possible quantifiers we choose.
A lot of sweets


A lot of cake




Much fun!


… and I still don't know
how
many people to invite... Hum, I don’t want to invite
too many
people or else I’ll need to have
too much
cake!
And still
so many
things to do!

"I’ll send
several
invitations and I hope to get
a few
confirmations. I also expect my friends to give it
a little
thought."



Enough
We use
enough
to emphasise that a quantity is sufficient for some purpose (before plural and uncountable nouns)

You haven’t had enough lessons.
(plural)

Are you getting enough help?
(uncountable)

Another
"We’re having
another
baby!"
Leaving out quantifiers altogether (e.g.
some
and
any
)
*
There aren’t parks in the centre of my city.
* Could I have help?
Other
and
another
(confusion)
*
I also like another sports.
* I would like other chance to take the exam.
Inappropriate use of
any
(in affirmative sentences)
*

I can’t pay. I have any money.

Students’ grade: 8th
Main aims:

To help students know how to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy food;
To develop students’ awareness of the difference between countable and uncountable nouns in English;
To help students practice the use of appropriate quantifiers in different situations.


Vanessa Ferreira and Lúcia Cadilhe
Meaning
Can you pass me
the
pens?
(i.e. the ones we both know about)

Can you pass me
some
pens?
(i.e. an indeterminate quantity of them)

Can you pass me
a few
pens?
(i.e. a small quantity of them)
Much, many and a lot of
Many
drinks
(
many
+
countable,

plural nouns
)
A lot of
sweets
(
a lot of
+
countable, plural nouns
)

A lot of
cake
(
a lot of
+
uncountable, singular nouns
)



Much
fun!
(
much
+
uncountable, singular nouns
)
We use
much
,
many
and
a lot of
to suggest a large quantity



We use
several
and
a few
with plural nouns and
a little
with uncountable ones.

We use
few
and
little
(without a) to suggest a strong sense of reservation, with a hint of ‘not enough’.
So, too and how
few
and
little
Both
+ texting
neither
+ talking
do not know +
either
All
+ queuing
Each
+ checking the hour

Both
,
either
,
neither
All, each, every
Every
minute counts!
So, we use
another
to emphasise that something is additional to an existing number or quantity (singular nouns).

How do coursebooks deal with quantifiers?
Difficulties for learners
Using
much
and
many
instead of
a lot of

*I have much money.
(affirmative)
Countable and uncountable nouns

*I don’t have many money.
Singular-plural confusion (after
each
,
every
and
a lot of
)

*Each regions are distinct.
*Every people are here now.
*A lot of animals is becoming extinct.

ANY
General use
In questions to ask about the existence of something
“Do you know any good jokes?”
After negative forms of the verb to indicate the non-existence of something
“I won’t bring any wine.”

“I don’t like ANY red wine.”
(I think all red wine is horrible.)
“You can take ANY book.”
(The choice is entirely open.)
Contents
What are quantifiers? What do they do?
Where do they come in sentences?
How do we choose them?
Examples of quantifiers
Overview
Difficulties for learners
How do coursebooks deal with quantifiers?
Micro-teaching activity

All, each, every
We use
all
,
each
and
every
to emphasise the “completeness” of a group or class of things:

All
(collective view) + plural or uncountable noun

Each
and
every
(individual point of view) + singular noun and verb

Each
is also used to refer to frequency and times and
every
for large numbers.

Both, either, neither
We use
both
,
either
and
neither
to refer to two people or things:

Both
(collective view) + plural noun.

Either
(point of view of alternatives)

Neither
(negative) + singular nouns and verbs .

Micro-teaching activity instructions
You will work in pairs for this activity.

1. Firstly, each pair comes to the board and each person chooses one flashcard to put on the right side of the table "Healthy/ Unhealthy food".

2. Secondly, you have to write three sentences using the food in the flashcards and using the following quantifiers: "
some, many, much, a lot of/lots of
".

3. The sentences can be about healthy habits or/and advice for healthy eating.
Full transcript