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Copy of Escape from Warsaw

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John Molloy

on 12 May 2011

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Transcript of Copy of Escape from Warsaw

Warsaw Ghetto The Warsaw Ghetto was established by the German Governor-General Hans Frank on October 16, 1940. Frank ordered Jews in Warsaw and its suburbs to be rounded up and herded into the Ghetto. The original definition fo the word ghetto is the section of a city in which all jews are required to live but over the years it has changed into the definition for anything that is low quality due to lack of money. At this time, the population in the Ghetto was estimated to be 400,000 people. The size of the Ghetto was about 2.5% of the size of Warsaw. The ghetto was split into two areas, the "small ghetto", generally inhabited by richer Jews and the "large ghetto", where conditions were more difficult; the two ghettos were linked by a single footbridge. The Nazis then closed the Warsaw Ghetto from the outside world on November 16, 1940, by building a wall, topped with barbed wire, and deploying armed guards. Warsaw Ghetto construction A breif summary When Joseph Balicki escaped from his Nazi prison, it took him four and a half weeks to walk back to Warsaw. He was looking for his wife Margrit and his three children, Ruth, Edek and Bronia. But when he reached the city, it was unrecognizable. Warsaw was just one gigantic bomb site. As he traveled through the pile of rubble that had once been his home he thought his family had not survived. But, in reality his wife Margrit had been taken away by the Nazis, and no one had seen his children since the night the house was destroyed. But the children had survived, and this began the childrens search for their parents and their fathers search for his wife. When Joseph Balicki escaped from his Nazi prison, it took him near a month to travel all the way back to Warsaw, his home town. He was looking for his wife Margrit and his three children, Ruth, Edek and Bronia. But when he reached the city, nothing was recognizable. Warsaw was one gigantic bomb-site. As he walked through the pile of rubble that had been his home he thought he would never see his family again. His wife Margrit had been taken away by the Nazis, and no one had seen his children since the night the house was destroyed. But the children had survived, and this begins the story of the search for their parents. The bombing of Warsaw A breif summary The Warsaw Ghetto was established by the German Governor-General Hans Frank on October 16, 1940. Frank ordered Jews in Warsaw to be rounded up and herded into the Ghetto. At this time, the population in the Ghetto was estimated to be 400,000 people. the size of the Ghetto was about 2.5% the size of Warsaw. The ghetto was split into two areas, the "small ghetto", generally inhabited by richer Jews and the "large ghetto", where conditions were more difficult; the two ghettos were linked by a single footbridge. The Nazis then closed the Warsaw Ghetto from the outside world on November 16, 1940, by building a wall, topped with barbed wire, and deploying armed guards. The Warsaw Ghetto Why was Warsaw bombed? The nazis bombed Warsaw in an effort to scare the defenders of Warsaw and anyone who dared to rebel against them. The date of this bombing was September 25, 1939. 500 tons of bombs were dropped on Warsaw. The Warsaw Uprising The Warsaw Uprising was a World War II struggle by the Polish Army to seperate Warsaw from German occupation. The Uprising began on August 1, 1944, as part of a nationwide rebellion, Operation Tempest. It was intended to last for only a few days until the Russians came to help however, Polish resistance against the German forces continued for 63 days (until October 2). Operation Tempest/Storm Operation Tempest sometimes referred to as Operation Storm was a series of uprisings conducted during World War II by the Polish Army

The Uprising's basic objectives were to:
end the German occupation;

seize arms and supplies needed for a Polish regular army

rebuild a regular Polish Army;

rebuild civil authority, communications, and an arms industry;

maintain peace and order behind the front lines;
and
begin offensive operations against German forces still on Polish land. Thank You! My Book The book I read was escape from warsaw by Ian Serraillier. Why did I pick this book? I picked this book because Ms. Thiel reccommended it to me. (told me to read it) Me making this prezi! Question to the author If I could ask the author one thing, it would be What inspired you to write this book? You want a fight? YOU GOT IT! The Warsaw Ghetto uprising was the Jewish resistance that arose within the Warsaw Ghetto in German occupied Poland during World War II, and which opposed Nazi Germany's effort to transport the remaining ghetto population to Treblinka extermination camp. The Treblinka Extermination camp It was German Nazi concentration camp during World War II. Located near the village of Treblinka, Poland, it opened in 1941 as a forced-labour camp. A larger and ultrasecret second camp a mile away, called Treblinka II, opened in 1942 as an extermination camp for Jews. Victims were stripped and marched into "bathhouses," where they were gassed with carbon monoxide from ceiling pipes. Ukrainian guards and up to 1,500 Jewish prisoner-workers performed the executions. The total number killed has been estimated at 700,000 to 900,000. In 1943 a group of prisoner-workers escaped, but most were soon killed or recaptured. The Treblinka II camp was closed in October of 1943, the labour camp (Treblinka I) was closed in July of 1944.
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