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Studio Photography

This tutorial teaches you the basics of setting up a simple studio using 1, 2 or 3 external lights.
by

Adley Lobo

on 11 November 2012

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Transcript of Studio Photography

Welcome to Studio Photography Adley Lobo - Shutterbugs 2012 What is studio photography? Studio photography is using artificial lighting to control the creation of your photograph. Basic Equipment for Studio Photography External Light(s) External Lighting There are a variety of lights to choose from and have a variety of uses. A few examples: Light stand(s) Light diffuser (s) "Screen" Extension cords Tripod "Location" External Flashes Strobe Lamps External flashes consist of you types:
"Camera Friendly"; SB900 or 580 EXII
"Not Camera Friendly"; OPL - M40 There are many, varying by intensity and size These are any lights that have their own stands; table lamps, work lights etc. Light stand(s) Tripods They are different from light stands Light Diffusers diffusers can be can thing that spreads the light to create an even effect (soft lighting) on the subject. They can be softboxes, umbrellas, reflectors, sheets of cloth etc. Location Location is important went setting up your equipment.
Structure
Traffic
Electric outlets Screen The background of your photos.
Self colored wall
Green screen Summary of Event Basic equipment used in studio photography
How to setup studio equipment
One light setup
Two light setup
Practical application Setup of 2 studio lights Step 1: work with a partner
Step 2: Pick an even wall
Step 3: make sure the lights are near electrical outlets
Step 4: Open stands from the bottom up.
(Easier to adjust for height)
Step 5: The main light (it is the light stand that is just higher than the subjects). The secondary light is the height of the subjects (opposite the main light)
Step 6: Attach lights and umbrellas to the light stands
Step 7: set your personal flash to something low like 1/128 or lower
Step 8: Experiment and play around with angles so you get the right setup Setup for 1 studio light Step 1: work with a partner
Step 2: Pick an even wall
Step 3: make sure the light is near electrical outlets
Step 4: Open stand from the bottom up.
(Easier to adjust for height)
Step 5: The main light (it is the light stand that is just higher than the subjects).
Step 6: Attach light and umbrella to the light stand
Step 7: set your personal flash to something low like 1/128 or lower
Step 8: Experiment and play around with angles so you get the right setup The practice Split into 3 teams
Each team works has to take a photograph using the three unique styles of studio photography
Portraits - Using the 1 studio light method
Glamor - Using the 1 studio light (with a reflector)
Action - Using 2 studio lights Thanks for coming! Visit us at utscsb.com Studio Setup for one light and a reflector Step 1: work with two partners
Step 2: Pick an even wall
Step 3: make sure the light is near electrical outlets
Step 4: Open stand from the bottom up.
(Easier to adjust for height)
Step 5: The main light (it is the light stand that is just higher than the subjects).
Step 6: Place the Reflector, slightly inline with the subject.
Step 7: Attach light and umbrella to the light stand
Step 8: set your personal flash to something low like 1/128 or lower
Step 9: Experiment and play around with angles so you get the right setup
Full transcript