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THE HISTORY OF MALAGA ISLAND

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Annes Elfar

on 28 February 2014

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Transcript of THE HISTORY OF MALAGA ISLAND

THE HISTORY OF MALAGA ISLAND
BY: Annes E.

GEOGRAPHY
THE EVICTION
During that time a man named Frederick Plaisted was the governor of Maine. He wanted to build a tourist attraction so that the townspeople could earn money. On July 11 1911, he ordered the natives to be cleared off the island by July 1912. If they were not gone by that time, he would burn down their homes.
DEADLINE
On July 1 1912, Plaisted saw that the natives refused to get off the island. He "claimed" some of them were feeble-minded. So Plaisted sent eight of the forty-five natives to a feeble-minded school in New Gloucester. The rest were forced off the island, some with there homes, and had their houses burned down.
In the late 18th century, Benjamin Darling was a slave who was given freedom and enough money to buy Horse Island (now known as Harbor Island) after he saved the life of his captain on a ship while they were on a shipwreck. His descendants spread out to other islands and were among the first people on Malaga Island.
WHAT HAPPENED TO MALAGA AFTER THE EVICTION?
They moved the school to another island. They also moved the cemetery to the Pineland Cemetery in New Gloucester. In 1913, the state sold Malaga to Dr. Gustavus Kilgore. After that, it was sold multiple times. They never built a tourist attraction, and they tried to clear any evidence that would show that anybody ever lived there. So they basically did the eviction for nothing.
THE TRIPP FAMILY
The Tripp family were one of the families forced off the island. They built a houseboat, floating from place to place, trying to find a place to settle. But no one would accept them because they were African-American. Robert Tripps wife, Laura Tripp, got ill. When her husband came back with help, he found his kids over her dead body.
THE EASON FAMILY
The Easons were also a family who were forced off of Malaga. John Eason was a mason and carpenter. He was also a preacher only when weather kept away the island residents from attending services at the mainland’s Nazarene church. Him and his family were forced to leave the island, just like others.

APOLOGY
On the day of September 12 2010, the State apologizes for the eviction of the natives in 1912. There was a gathering of descendents from Malaga Island. “Let me just say that, I’m sorry , I’m sorry for what was done,” said Governor John BaldacciIt. It was held 98 years after the eviction.
PRESENT MALAGA
Today Malaga is still quite deserted. Nobody lives there. Some archeologists are trying to find information or research about Malagas history. Right now, a organization named Maine Coast Heritage Trust (MCHT) bought Malaga Island last,in 2001, and still own it up to today. Discovering different things, and learning about Malagas history, they are trying to keep it safe.
Malaga Island is a small island that is 42 acres. It is located near the coast of Phippsburg, Maine. It is near two other islands; Horse Island and
Bear Island.
BENJAMIN DARLING
http://maineanencyclopedia.com/malaga-island/
http://blainehouse.org/governors/Frederick_W_Plaisted.html
http://freepressonline.com/main.asp?SectionID=52&SubSectionID=78&ArticleID=19221
SOURCES
http://maineinsights.com/perma/a-new-beginning-for-malaga-island
http://www.mcht.org/preserves/
images/Malaga.jpg
Print Sources:
Schmidt, Gary, et al. Lizzie Bright and The Buckminister Boy, New York City:Laurel-Leaf, 2004
Online Sources:
"Malaga Island", Maine an Encyclopedia, <maineanencyclopedia.com/malaga-island/> (2-26-2014)
"Malaga Island An Overview of its Natural and Cultural History", MCHT,<http://mcht.org/preserves/docs/Malaga%20overview%203-9-09%20final.pdf>, (2-26-2014)
MORE SOURCES ...
Rosenthal, Rob, "About The Project", Malaga Island a Story Best Left Untold,2009,<http://malagaislandmaine.org/about.htm> (2-19-2014)
Woodward, Colin, "Malaga Island: A Century of Shame", 2012, <http://www.pressherald.com/opinion/a-century-of-shame_2012-05-20.html?pagenum=full>, (2-20-14)
Houx, Ramona, "A New Beggining For Malaga Island", Maine Insights, 2010, <http://maineinsights.com/perma/a-new-beginning-for-malaga-island>, (2-27-2014)
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