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Horace and Morris but mostly Dolores Reading Street U5W4

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Cheryl Jacobs

on 16 April 2014

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Transcript of Horace and Morris but mostly Dolores Reading Street U5W4

Horace and Morris
but mostly Dolores
by James Howe
Unit 5 Week 4
Genre: Fantasy
Fantasy is a make-believe
story that could never
happen in real life.
Consonant Patterns
ph, gh, ck, ng

CCSS RF 2.3
Know and apply grade-level phonics and
word analysis skills in decoding words.

CCSS RF 2.3e
Identify words with inconsistent but
common spelling-sound correspondences.

CCSS RF 2.3f
Recognize and read grade-appropriate
irregularly spelled words.
The
/f/
sound we hear in the
word phone is spelled with
ph
.
The
/f/
sound we hear in the
word laugh is spelled with
gh
.
The
/k/
sound we hear in the
word lock is spelled with
ck
.
The
/ng/
sound we hear in the
word swing is spelled with
ng
.
This week we will learn to read and
spell words with the consonant
patterns ph, gh, ck, and ng.
Question of the Week:

How can we be responsible friends
and neighbors?
This week we will read a story
about friends who like to go
on adventures.
dol
ph
in
cou
gh

pi
ck
le
ri
ng

ba
ck
pa
ck

tro
ph
y
si
ng

tru
ck

ele
ph
ant
enou
gh

clo
ck

ha
ng
er
go
ph
er

che
ck
ers
ki
ng

Spelling Words

CCSS RF 2.3
Know and apply grade-level phonics and
word analysis skills in decoding words.

CCSS RF 2.3e
Identify words with inconsistent but
common spelling-sound correspondences.

CCSS RF 2.3f
Recognize and read grade-appropriate
irregularly spelled words.
phone enough backpack clang
graph laugh ticket duckling
photo tough duckling
rough
cough

half front
Character and Setting

CCSS RL 2.3
Describe how characters in a story respond to
major events and challenges.

CCSS RL 2.7
Use information gained from the illustrations
and words in a print or digital text to
demonstrate understanding of its characters,
setting, and plot.

Characters
are the people or animals
in a story.
Setting
is when and where
a story takes place.
Vocabulary Words
CCSS RF 2.3f
Recognize and read grade-appropriate
irregularly spelled words.
adventure
an exciting experience
climbed
went upward
clubhouse
a house or structure where a
group meets
exploring
going someplace to discover
what it is like
greatest
the best or most wonderful
truest
the most real or loyal
wondered
wanted to know more
Amazing Words
CCSS L 2.6
Use words and phrases acquired through
conversations, reading and being read to,
and responding to texts.
appreciate
feel thankful for something
communicate
give information in ways such as
talking, writing, drawing, or sign
language
respect
to feel or show honor for
someone or something
demand
order someone to do something
firmly
say something in a way that shows
you won't change your mind
advantage
better chance at doing something
than someone else
defiant
not obedient
ferocious
powerful, violent, fierce
Story Structure
CCSS RL 2.5
Describe the overall structure of a story,
including describing how the beginning
introduces the story and the ending
concludes the action.

Story structure
is the arrangement
of a story from beginning to end.
Good readers think about the order
of events of a story. This can help
you retell what happens in a story.
Different Kinds of Pronouns
CCSS L 2.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions
of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.

CCSS L 2.1c
Use reflexive pronouns (e.g. myself,
ourselves)
A
pronoun
takes the place of a
noun or nouns.
I
,
he
,
she
,
we
,
and
they
are used as subjects of
sentences. The
pronouns

me
,
him
,

her
,
us
, and
them
are used after
action words. The
pronouns

you

and
it
can be used anywhere in a
sentence.

Possessive pronouns
show who or what
owns, or possesses, something.
My
,

mine
,
our
,
ours
,
his
,
her
, and
hers
are
some
possessive pronouns
.
Pronouns that refer the action of the
verb back to the subject end in self or
selves. Examples are
itself
,
myself
,

ourselves
, and
themselves
. These
pronouns are
reflexive pronouns
.
Compound Words
CCSS L 2.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of
standard English grammar and usage when
writing or speaking.

CCSS L 2.3
Use knowledge of language and its
conventions when writing, speaking, reading,
or listening.

CCSS L 2.4d
Use knowledge of the meaning of individual
words to predict the meaning of compound
words (e.g. birdhouse, lighthouse, housefly,
bookshelf, notebook, bookmark.

CCSS L 2.5
Demonstrate understanding of word
relationships and nuances in word meanings.
A
compound word
is a word made up of
two or more shorter words. The meaning
of the
compound word
often comes from
the meanings of the separate words.
tooth + brush = toothbrush
hay + stack = haystack
corn + field = cornfield
farm + house = farmhouse
club + house = clubhouse
base + ball = baseball
bird + house = birdhouse
light + house = lighthouse
book + shelf = bookshelf
note + book = notebook
book + mark = bookmark
snow + ball = snowball
sail + boat = sailboat
star + fish = starfish
dog + house = doghouse
Start a Club
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