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Tinkerbell

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by

Abigail Veit

on 30 October 2013

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Transcript of Tinkerbell

Tinkerbell
Tinkerbell has BPD
DSM-IV
DSM-IV-TR (2004) Criteria for Diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder.
Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)
Borderline Personality Disorder is a mental illness marked by unstable moods, behaviors, and relationships.
Tinkerbell~Back story
Born in Neverland around the year of 2000
She was created after Peter Pan sprinkled pixie dust and a magic potion, that he got from another fairy, on a tulip
It only took a few seconds, but Tinkerbell blossomed from the flower
Peter and Tinkerbell lived together on the island of Neverland. They were best friends and were always together
They also lived with the Lost Boys, who were friends of Peter's
Peter and the Lost Boys never had a mother, they grew up on their own with Tinkerbell
They lived in a secret location
A "house" underground, the entrance was through a tree trunk
Tinkerbell grew up (kind of, you can't grow up in Neverland) with Peter her whole life and never lived with any other women so Tinkerbell never had a reason to be jealous until Wendy came along.
Examples
Statistics
Treatment
Symptoms
Extreme reactions
Patterns of intense and stormy relationships
Distorted and unstable self-image or sense of self
Impulsive, dangerous behavior
Recurring suicidal behaviors or threats or self-harming behavior
Intense and highly changeable moods
Chronic feelings of emptiness and/or boredom
Inappropriate, intense anger or problems controlling anger
Having stress-related paranoid thoughts or severe dissociative symptoms
THE
END
Difficult to treat
Psychotherapy, or "talk" therapy
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Dialectical Behavior Therapy
Schema-focused Therapy
Medications
Tinkerbell is mad because she has been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder.
In this video, Tinkerbell becomes frustrated after not being able to get out of the drawer.

Another factor that contributes to her anger is Wendy. Tinkerbell strongly does not like Wendy. She tried to kill her once in the movie and she does not like her because she is "another woman in Peter Pan's life". This fuels her anger and frustration.

The essential feature of Borderline Personality Disorder is a
pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects
, and marked impulsivity that
begins by early adulthood
and is present in a variety of contexts. Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder make frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment (Criterion 1). The perception of impending separation or rejection, or the loss of external structure, can lead to profound changes in self-image, affect, cognition, and behavior. These individuals are
very sensitive to environmental circumstances
. They experience intense abandonment fears and
inappropriate anger
even when faced with a
realistic time-limited separation
or when there are
unavoidable changes in plans
(e.g., sudden despair in reaction to a clinician's announcing the end of the hour; panic or fury when someone important to them is just a few minutes late or must cancel an appointment). They may believe that this
"abandonment"
implies they are "bad."
These abandonment fears are related to an intolerance of being alone
and a need to have other people with them.
Their frantic efforts to avoid abandonment may include impulsive actions such as self-mutilating or suicidal behaviors, which are described separately in Criterion 5.

BPD is manifested by a pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by five (or more) of the following:
1. Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment. Note: Do not include suicidal or self-mutilating behavior covered in (5).
2. A pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships characterized by alternating between extremes of idealization and devaluation. This is called "splitting."
3. Identity disturbance: markedly and persistently unstable self-image or sense of self.
4. Impulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-damaging (e.g., spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating). Note: Do not include suicidal or self-mutilating behavior covered in (5).
5. Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-mutilating behavior.

6. Affective instability due to a marked reactivity of mood (e.g., intense episodic dysphoria, irritability, or anxiety usually lasting a few hours and only rarely more than a few days).

7. Chronic feelings of emptiness.

8. Inappropriate, intense anger or difficulty controlling anger (e.g., frequent displays of temper, constant anger, recurrent physical fights).

9. Transient, stress-related paranoid ideation or severe dissociative symptoms

DSM-IV Diagnosis
"
realistic time-limited separation
or when there are
unavoidable changes in plans
(e.g., sudden despair in reaction to a clinician's announcing the end of the hour; panic or fury when someone important to them is just a few minutes late or must cancel an appointment). They may believe that this
"abandonment"
implies they are "bad."
These abandonment fears are related to an intolerance of being alone
and a need to have other people with them.
"
"Realistic Time-Limited Separation"
When Wendy comes along, Tinkerbell feels as if Peter is leaving her for Wendy, she is no longer the only woman in Peter's life.
"Unavoidable changes in plans"
Wendy's presence
"Abandonment"
Tinkerbell feels abandoned when Wendy comes along and feels of less importance to him, this makes her feel as if she is abandoned and that he does not care for her anymore.
"These abandonment fears are related to an intolerance of being alone"
Since Tinkerbell has grown up with Peter her whole life she is scared of him "abandoning" her for Wendy which is a cause of her borderline personality disorder, the fear of losing Peter.
According to the Symptoms... that are shown, Tinkerbell has been officially diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder.
The symptoms are evident that Tinkerbell has Borderline Personality Disorder. In addition to that, when researching Tinkerbell it has said it on many websites that Tinkerbell has BPD.

"The
extremes in her personality
are explained in-story by the fact that a fairy's..."
-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinker_Bell

http://books.google.com/books?id=bDcLlJCL_6IC&pg=PA172&lpg=PA172&dq=how+tinkerbell+has+borderline+personality+disorder&source=bl&ots=HXELSdBuPm&sig=790Et5hbyMM2B5tpX3OJhvBaRuo&hl=en&sa=X&ei=drZnUubSIoS69gT8i4DABg&ved=0CCsQ6AEwAA&safe=active#v=onepage&q=how%20tinkerbell%20has%20borderline%20personality%20disorder&f=false from Developmental Psychology book

https://www.google.com/search?q=how+tinkerbell+has+borderline+personality+disorder&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=com.frontmotion:en-US:unofficial&client=firefox-a 1st link

By Abigail Veit and Sarah Partridge
• Affects 6-10 million Americans (about the populations of New York City)
• 2-6% of the general population
• At least 10% of all mental health outpatients
• At least 20% of psychiatric inpatients
• 75-90% diagnosed are women
• 1 in 10 people with BPD commit suicide (this number is 400 times higher than the general population
• Young women with BPD have a suicide rate of 800 times higher than the general population

works cited
http://bpdresourcecenter.org/factsStatistics.html
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/borderline-personality-disorder/index.shtml
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/statistics/1Borderline.shtml
Full transcript