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Ramsha Zahid

on 18 October 2013

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Transcript of "Ode-Ori"

Cultural Bound Syndrome
Cultural Background
Syndrome is located in West Africa
Prominent amongst Yoruba Nigerians.
Ode-Ori means "hunter of the head"
Diagnosis is lead by tribal healer
Somatic and depressive symptoms
Leads to depression and anxiety
Sensation of an organism crawling in the head through other parts of the body.
Noises in the ears.
Palpitations and somatic complaints.
Dizziness, darkened vision, itching, tickling, head ace, body pains, etc.
Pharmacotherapy through the use of inhibitors, tranquilizers and anxiolytic agents
Psychotherapy in the form of support groups and interventions
Very few saw signs of improvement
Cultural bound syndromes vs. mental disorder?
Lack of recognition.
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of mental disorders explained the symptoms to be schizophrenia, atypical anxiety, atypical psychosis, atypical depression, etc.
Autonomic over activity on a psychopathology basis
Yoruba healers believe that the organisms in the infected are located below the anterior fontanella
Cultural belief of a destiny (“ayanmo”)- predetermined fate
Noises being heard are a sign of enemies with the intent on doing harm

Aina, Of, and O. Morakinyo. "Culture–bound Syndromes and the Neglect of Cultural Factors in Psychopathologies among Africans." African Journal of Psychiatry 14.4 (2011): 278-85. Print.

Kirmayer, Laurence J., M.D. "Cultural Variations in the Clinical Presentation of Depression and Anxiety: Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment." Psychiatry 13th ser. 62 (2001): 22-28. McGill University. Web. 13 Oct. 2013. <ttp://www.mcgill.ca/files/tcpsych/LJK-depanx.pdf>.

Makanjuola, R. 0.A. "“O.de. Ori”: A Culture-bound Disorder with Prominent Somatic Features in Yoruba Nigerian Patients." Wiley Online Library. Dept. of Mental Health, 13 June 1986. Web. 13 Oct. 2013.

Mezzich,Juan, E. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis: A DSM-IV Perspective. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric, 1996. Print.

by Ramsha Zahid
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