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IAUS

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Jason Ch

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Transcript of IAUS

Eisenman and William Elis wrote a report on street typology, in which they researched historic urban projects, such as building the Uffizzi complex on a street near Arno.This wont a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Arthur Drexler (Director of Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Architecture)

was shown the Jersey Corridor project when he went to a lecture at Princeton, 1965 Peter Eisenman (Assistant professor at Princeton’s School of Architecture)
Along with Michael Graves in midst of 2 projects,1964:

CASE

Jersey Corridor Eisenman was in a power struggle with the new Princeton dean, Robert Geddes
during the planning of the MoMA exhibition, 1965 Eisenman’s contract was later terminated Idea as Model: exhibtion cataliogue 3, 1981 Booklet describing general overview of IAUS activities. 1979 Initial mock-up for the first issue of Oppositions, 1973 A photo-montage from a 1971 issue of Casabella Toyo Ito, Tadao Ando, and Charles Gwathmey in discussion at a party for the 15th anniversary of the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies. New York City, 1983 About complex adaptive systems of six planned communities.edited Susana Torre Skyline: mock-up, 1978 Skyline: first issue, April 1978 Calendar of Exhibition, Lectures and Events Skyline, March 1979: advertisements Presenting architects as celebrities, the magazine fostered the cult of personality; selecting which architects and events to cover, it suggested who was part of the scene and who was not. This certainly contributed to strengthening the star system in architecture. New Wave of Japanese Architecture: Exhibition Catalogue 10, 1978 This catalogue published 5 years after the exhibition Skyline, October 1981 Skyline was relaunched in October 1981 Oppositions Books: A Scientific Autobiography, 1982 In competition with Oppositions for financial supports 1973: Another Chance for Housing: Low-Rise Alternatives 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1967 Architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable wrote in The New York Times, “The exhibition marks the return of the museum to an activist position in the promotion of what it believes to be the best in design—a leadership role that it carried in objects and furnishings for many years, and is now applying to the much more complex built environment.” In 1969 the Institute stated its mission; “As an alternative to academic studies and present practice of the profession, the Institute combines teaching, research and development into one process. To this end it coordinates the resources of the university, the museum, and public and private planning agencies.” They stated that it was, “ to bridge the gap between the theoretical world of the university and pragmatic world of the planning agencies.” The IAUS also wrote in 1969; “The major area of concern is with the problem of physical design as a problem solving device of structuring the urban environment understood as the active relationship between physical systems and social systems.” The New City: Architecture and Urban Renewal, MOMA exhibition, 1967. Kennrht Frampton and Peter Eisenman sporting matching haircuts at 8 West 40th Street, CIRCA, 1970 The Revolving door with Cesariano's Vitruvian Man strapped to a grid on one side, Le Corbusier's modulor man was pasted on the other In the 1975 interview with Boyarsky, Eisenman argued that the Institute never had a curriculum, or a philosophy: “Its only philosophy, if it stands for anything, is to serve as a vehicle for critical discourse, for challenging the prevailing empirical attitude in the United States vis-à-vis architecture—i.e. that it is something useful, something that can be marketed, a commodity.” Institute members wearing sweatshirts with Vitruvian man images and posing as a soccer team Journal on Arts Tabloid: A newspaper of small format giving the news in condensed form, usually with illustrated, often sensational material. IAUS partnered with Urban Development Corporation (UDC) to design low rise medium density housing, 1972 It was the only built project by IAUS.
The site was located in the waste segment of Brooklyn, Ocean HillIt was designed jointly by , IAUS (Kenneth Frampton, Arthur Baker) + UDC committee (Tony Pangaro, Ted Liebman, Micheal Kirkland) IAUS got involved with Columbia’ New City Team, they were working as Mayor’s Urban Design Group with New York City Planning Commissions, 1967 IAUS was asked to do an analysis of text and images of the Kingsbridge Heights section in the northwest Bronx Drexler invited Eisenman representing Princeton, along with Columbia, Cornell and MIT to form an exhibition: The New City “Five on Five”, Architectural Forum, May 1973 Participating in the “Conference of Architects for the Study of the Environment” (CASE) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York were architects Michael Graves, Peter Eisenman, Richard Meier, Charles Gwathmey, and John Hejduk – soon known as the “New York Five.” 1969 Five Architects, edited by Kenneth Frampton, 1972 Began in 1979, a series produced by Eisenman, Frampton, Ockman, and Lindsay Stamm Shapiro that is part of larger vision of IAUS to make important foreign texts available in English that was unrealized after 1982. Only a total of five books was published. Establishment of IAUS
(Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies)
Independent non-profit educational corporation, 1967 Eisenman recruited Drexler to join him to start a
new educational institution.

End of the opening of “The New City” (Jan 23, 1967)
IAUS was established, with Eisenman being the director. Oppositions Books Oppositions 26, 1984 Last issue due to lack of funding and dimishing population of Institute fellows (bitter personal arguments.

This issue is deemed unauthentic by Joan Ockman due to past-oriented contents, the post-modren halloween orange cover, and uncritical conventional layout. Oppositions 6, 1976 Eisenman wrote the editorial, "Post-Functional," the Vitruvian Man at the Institute office door disappeared. New Urban settlements, December 1970 Opposition, a quarterly journal presenting articles for ideas and criticism in architecture, initiated in September 1973 by a group of significant figures like Peter Eisenman, Kenneth Frampton, Anthony Vidler, and Mario Gandelsonas, etc. Oppositions also a proportional reminder of Rowe's and the Institute's ties to humanism Drexler invited Eisenman representing Princeton, along with Columbia, Cornell and MIT to form an exhibition a monthly newspaper that complemented the intellectually ambitious journals Oppositions and October Skyline A journal on arts October On Streets offers illustrated studies of the history and sociology of streets, their role in urban life, their design and structure, as well as an actual demonstration project. On Streets, Stanford Anderson, 1978 Stand-alone + parallel
publications Starting in 1978, the Institute published a series of catalogues that eventually included 16 titles. Published in arbitrary order, they documented solo exhibitions, group shows and Institute retrospectives, and featured critical essays. Exhibitions + Catalogues Metropolis It was Vignelli's idea that the catalogues could show different images on the front and back covers. Here the front cover shows a cutout of Michael Graves' poster design, which was originally manufactured by hand in a limited edition and mounted on a template that Vignelli designed, to finance the exhibition. The back cover shows Aldo Rossi's Teatrino Scientifico (1978), which was actually produced after the show took place. Vignelli’s spare cover design and page layout were based on the same two- and three-column grid used for Oppositions. When Rizzoli International became publisher of the catalogues, in 1981, the cover designs were slightly altered, with pastel colors now used for titles. Skyline was relaunched in October 1981, in a reconceived and redesigned version (this followed Andrew MacNair's resignation; Suzanne Stephens was now editor). At this point the Institute began seeking professional sponsorships for Skyline, which was facing competition from two recently launched magazines, Metropolis and Express.

With Vignelli responsible for the overall graphic image, Skyline was now designed by Michael Bierut, then a young designer in Vignelli's office. The cover for the October issue 1981 — with its large text set in Bodoni — represented a break with Vignelli's former rules. Skyline, November 1981: Rebuttal In the early '80s the graphic design of Skyline was somewhat post-modernized and Americanized, with the page layout bulkier, type size larger. (Michael Bierut has been quoted as saying that opponents seemed to be screaming at each other in 36-point font.) Skyline, October 1981: In Memoriam Skyline, October 1981: Cooking up the Classics In 1977, Andrew MacNair, who would edit Skyline in its first two years, created the mock-up, a single newsprint sheet, based on Vignelli's systematic approach.

As Skyline grew into a tabloid, Vignelli became responsible for the graphic design. In addition to a centerfold calendar, the magazine featured interviews with architects and designers and reviews of books, exhibitions, films and set and restaurant design. Articles were written by Institute staff and fellows as well as outside authors. Skyline, April 1978 Addressing a broader public than Oppositions or October, Skyline not only announced the Institute's events in the calendar but also made space for advertisements, including those for Institute programs and publications. MTA map Skyline: first issue, April 1978 A new MTA (Metropolitan Transit Authority) map designed by John Tauranac had gotten approved over Massimo Vignelli's map of 1972. MTA claimed that the new map was easier to read, but Skyline in this issue begged differ. Massimo Vignelli's MTA map of 1972 1971: "Art and Architecture- USSR 1917-32" **

1973: "Another Chance for Housing: Low Rise Alternatives", at MoMA, New York **

1974: "Mart Stam, Dutch Architect" **
"Drawing as Architecture"

1975: "Goodbye Five: Work by Young Architects"
"The Design Work of Massimo and Lella Vignelli"
"Tim Prentice Sculptures"
"Photographs by Dorathy Alexander"

1976: "Aldo Rossi: Projects and Drawings" * (March 25- April 17)
"Massimo Scolari: Drawings and Projects" * (MAy 15- June 30)
"A Space a Thousand Words" **
"Suburban Alternatives: 11 Americans" at the Venice Biennale **
"Idea as Model" *

1977: "The Princeton Beaux Arts and its New Academism, The Program from Labutut to Geddes"
"Robert Krier: The Loss of Space" * (April 18- May 2)
"The Architecture of Matthias Ungers" * (May 6- May 31)
"Gwathmey Siegel: Twenty Four Residences" *

1978: "Ivan Leonidov" *
"The Image of Home: Giuliano Firenzoli, Nancy Goldring, Michael Webb" **
"Leon Krier: SOme IDeas o be Built"
"Nine Quotations and Nine Metaphors: Arata Isozaki"
"Projects, Sets, Arcadias: Ron Herron and Peter Cook"
" Philip Johnson: Processes of Architecture" *
"Lauretta Vinciarelli: Projects 1973- 1978"
"A NEw Wave of Japanese Architecture" *

1979: "Aldo Rossi: Architecture and Utopia" *
"Wallace K. Harrison: New York Architect"

1980: "John Hejduk: 7 Houses" * (January 22- February 16)
"Masimo Scolari: Drawings" * (May 20- July 6)
"A New Wave of Austrian Architecture" *
"Marc Treib Posters"
"Gaetano Pesce"

1981: "Le Corbusier's Firminy Church" *
"Clorinda Teste"
"Kazuo Shinohara" *

Exhibition initiated at the IAUS, but completed and exhibited elsewhere:
"Raymond Hood" * at the Whitnay Museum, Philip Morris branch, 1983
"William Lescaze" * at Syracuse University, 1983
"New West Coast Architecture" * at the National Academy of Design, New York, 1984

* Exhibitions documented by the IAUS Exhibition Catalogues Program
** Exhibitions with catalogues not in IAUS Exhibitions Catalogues Program John Hejduk: 7 Houses, 1980 About complex adaptive systems of six planned communities.edited Susana Torre The New City: Architecture and Urban Renewal, MOMA exhibition, 1967. New York Five, 1996 Image depict the four surviving members of the so-called New York Five inhabiting models of their own buildings. IAUS got involved with Columbia’ New City Team, they were working as Mayor’s Urban Design Group with New York City Planning Commissions, 1967 IAUS was asked to do an analysis of text and images of the Kingsbridge Heights section in the northwest Bronx “Five on Five”, Architectural Forum, May 1973 Participating in the “Conference of Architects for the Study of the Environment” (CASE) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York were architects Michael Graves, Peter Eisenman, Richard Meier, Charles Gwathmey, and John Hejduk – soon known as the “New York Five.” 1969 Five Architects, edited by Kenneth Frampton, 1972 Exhibition on Russian Constructivism
The Institue’s first exhibition, it was accompanied by a catalog designed by Robert Slutzky, 1971 There was also a special issue of the Italian architectural magazine, Casabella containing articles by IAUS members. New Urban settlements, December 1970 Drexler invited Eisenman representing Princeton, along with Columbia, Cornell and MIT to form an exhibition Advanced Design Workshop poster,
1980/81 A one-year course for undergraduate and graduate students that focused on experimental design, with federal funding from the HEW-FIPSE program High School Architecture Studio, 1983–84 An interdisciplinary event organized by Institute fellows, focusing on the interplay between metropolitan culture and theatrical performance. Gordon Matta-Clark incident O.M Ungers, Poster for IAUS Exhibition,
1977 Invitation cards for IAUS exhibition openings, 1979-1981 Poster for the Open Plan program, 1980 On Streets offers a superbly illustrated study of the history and sociology of streets, their role in urban life, their design and structure, as well as an actual demonstration project. On Streets, Stanford Anderson, 1978 Toyo Ito, Tadao Ando, and Charles Gwathmey in discussion at a party for the 15th anniversary of the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies. New York City, 1983 City as Theater, 1977 An interdisciplinary event organized by Institute fellows, focusing on the interplay between metropolitan culture and theatrical performance. Open Plan, 1978 The Open Plan poster had a large print run and was distributed to architecture schools and professional offices across the country IAUS partnered with Urban Development Corporation (UDC) to design low rise medium density housing, 1972 It was the only built project by IAUS.
The site was located in the waste segment of Brooklyn, Ocean HillIt was designed jointly by , IAUS (Kenneth Frampton, Arthur Baker) + UDC committee (Tony Pangaro, Ted Liebman, Micheal Kirkland) Philip Johnson: Processes. Poster for the
IAUS Exhibition. 1978 The City as Image high school program, 1979 Poster for the Open Plan program, 1979 Exhibitions shown at MoMA Starting in 1978, the Institute published a series of catalogues that eventually included 16 titles. Published in arbitrary order, they documented solo exhibitions, group shows and Institute retrospectives, and featured critical essays. Exhibitions + Catalogues Exhibition on Russian Constructivism
The Institue’s first exhibition, it was accompanied by a catalog designed by Robert Slutzky, 1971 In Conclusion:

Revising Oppositions' aim as established by Eisenman, Frampton, and Gandelsonas in Oppositions 3 to establish a dialectic discourse in architecture rather than rhetorical.

They want, each in their own way:

1. to formulate a model for the relationship of architecture and society;
2. to explore how theory related to practice
3. to view how architecture as a critical agent affected the lifeworld and the idea of "progress"; and
4. to see whether architecture was subject to a cultural or existential conditioned outcome or whether it was purely limited by "a universal construct of the mind." From Spain
Havard Graduate School of design Chairman
Pritzker Prize Winner,1996 Rafael Maneo Dean of the school of Arch of Princeton University Stan Allen Dean of Yale
Director of Columbia's Temple Hoyne Buell Center Robert Stern Dean of Columbia (1988 - 2003)
Also taught at AA, Princeton & Cooper Union Bernard Tschumi Head of MIT's PhD program in history, theory & criticism of architecture, art and urban form. Stanford Anderson Dean of Cornell University
Dean of Cooper Union since 2001 Anthony Vidler Ware Professor of Architecture at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University, New York. Kenneth Frampton Professor of Yale School of Architecture
Professor Emeritus at the Cooper Union School of Architecture. Peter Eisenman Director, Center for Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure of Princeton Mario Gandelsonas Professor of Cooper Union Diana Agrest Tenured Professor of Architecture at Columbia University Laurie Hawkinson Taught at Harvard University, Cooper Union Andrew MacNair National Endowment of the Humanities granted IAUS a $350,000 to develop Open Plan Eisenman and Graves' Design Charles Moore
OPPOSITIONS 3:
After a New Architecture

OPPOSITIONS 6:
Conclusion


Robert A. M. Stern
OPPOSITIONS 4:
Yale 1950-1965

OPPOSITIONS 10:
The Evolution of Philip Johnson's Glass House, 1947-1948 Beaux-Arts show at MoMA Copper square housing as an example of a perimeter block Studies of different forms and uses in the city Lisle Avenue in Binghamton, NY
Designed street frontage with landscaping the start of evening lecture series http://urbanomnibus.net
Photo: Karen Kubey http://urbanomnibus.net
Photo: Karen Kubey Participating in the “Conference of Architects for the Study of the Environment” (CASE) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York were architects Michael Graves, Peter Eisenman, Richard Meier, Charles Gwathmey, and John Hejduk – soon known as the “New York Five.” 1969 “Five on Five”, Architectural Forum, May 1973 Five Architects, edited by Kenneth Frampton, 1972 New York Times, thought that the series was " the most valuable set of courses given by any school or institution in the city. Both the subjects and speakers are outstanding and unduplicated anywhere else." A writer for The New Yorker, Gill acknowledged MacNair for the "very high caliber of the constituency you serve." evening lectures replaced by Open plan An axonometric diagram showing the arrangement of proprietary open space and front stoops of Marcus Garvey Park Village
totalarch.com the last series for Open Plan the start of undergraduate program Evening Lecture Series during lunch Eisenman thought it best occurs in informal exchanges. Casual lunch with Aldo Rossi Eisenman thought it best occurs in informal exchanges. 1973: Another Chance for Housing: Low-Rise Alternatives New York Five, 1996 Image depict the four surviving members of the so-called New York Five inhabiting models of their own buildings. New York Five, 1996 Image depict the four surviving members of the so-called New York Five inhabiting models of their own buildings. New York Five, 1996 Image depict the four surviving members of the so-called New York Five inhabiting models of their own buildings. 1974 This acted as a stepping stone for them to get a major fund from HUD
This was with the help of Arthur Drexler, that the fund was secured Cover of IAUS year book 1973 Economic Recession Mario Gandelsonas Peter Eisenman Kenneth Frampton Anthony Vidler Initial mock-up for the first issue of Oppositions, 1973 Skyline: mock-up, 1978 Skyline: first issue, April 1978 Calendar of Exhibition, Lectures and Events Skyline, March 1979: advertisements Presenting architects as celebrities, the magazine fostered the cult of personality; selecting which architects and events to cover, it suggested who was part of the scene and who was not. This certainly contributed to strengthening the star system in architecture. Skyline, October 1981 Skyline was relaunched in October 1981 Skyline, November 1981: Rebuttal In the early '80s the graphic design of Skyline was somewhat post-modernized and Americanized, with the page layout bulkier, type size larger. (Michael Bierut has been quoted as saying that opponents seemed to be screaming at each other in 36-point font.) Skyline, October 1981: In Memoriam Skyline, October 1981: Cooking up the Classics Skyline, April 1978 Addressing a broader public than Oppositions or October, Skyline not only announced the Institute's events in the calendar but also made space for advertisements, including those for Institute programs and publications. MTA map view of large hall of 40th Street view of large hall of 40th Street, Open Plan Charles Gwathmey Frank Gehry John Hejduk Steven Holl Alison and Peter Smithsons' Robin Hood Gardens Alison and Peter Smithsons' Golden Lane housing Alison and Peter Smithsons' Shadrach Woods Oppositions Books: A Scientific Autobiography, 1982 IAUS Exhibitions In Conclusion:

Revising Oppositions' aim as established by Eisenman, Frampton, and Gandelsonas in Oppositions 3 to establish a dialectic discourse in architecture rather than rhetorical.

They want, each in their own way:

1. to formulate a model for the relationship of architecture and society;
2. to explore how theory related to practice
3. to view how architecture as a critical agent affected the lifeworld and the idea of "progress"; and
4. to see whether architecture was subject to a cultural or existential conditioned outcome or whether it was purely limited by "a universal construct of the mind."

On 3: in terms of education, they have definitely make a mark….
as evident in how…

On 2: according to the interview of ??? …. the answer from Eisenman and others were "no."

On 1: At an interview of the psychologist… this critical methodology of thinking about architecture has not impacted the discourse/ industry much…

artist


Our stance?
capitalism, no longer driven by a certain theory or ideology
client/ $
education, yes.
open-ended questions/ criticism ---> different schools of architecture nowadays
it could be this exact ideology that could lead to a more vibrant architectural discourse/ environment

Questions:

do u think they (publications and all) have impacted arch world?

Summary:
within the arch circle (professionals/ students) and widened to a general public Eisenman and William Elis wrote a report on street typology, in which they researched historic urban projects, such as building the Uffizzi complex on a street near Arno.
This wont a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).This acted as a stepping stone for them to get a major fund from HUD Housing and Urban Development, HUD (federal cabinet department)
Urban Design Program of New York’s Major John V.LindsayNew York Urban
Development Corporation, UDC From Spain
Havard Graduate School of design Chairman
Pritzker Prize Winner,1996 Rafael Maneo Dean of the school of Arch of Princeton University Stan Allen Dean of Yale
Director of Columbia's Temple Hoyne Buell Center Robert Stern Dean of Columbia (1988 - 2003)
Also taught at AA, Princeton & Cooper Union Bernard Tschumi Head of MIT's PhD program in history, theory & criticism of architecture, art and urban form. Stanford Anderson Dean of Cornell University
Dean of Cooper Union since 2001 Anthony Vidler Ware Professor of Architecture at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University, New York. Kenneth Frampton Professor of Yale School of Architecture
Professor Emeritus at the Cooper Union School of Architecture. Peter Eisenman Professor of Cooper Union Diana Agrest Tenured Professor of Architecture at Columbia University Laurie Hawkinson
Full transcript