Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

At the Confluence of Languages – Language Transfer as a Lear

No description
by

Aleksandra Serwotka

on 11 October 2017

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of At the Confluence of Languages – Language Transfer as a Lear

At the Confluence of Languages – Language Transfer as a Learning Strategy
At the Confluence of Languages – Language Transfer as a Learning Strategy
The outline of the presentation
1. Introduction
2. Deliberations on multilingualism and the multilingual mind
3. Language learning strategies
4. Analysing the survey
5. Conclusions and pragmatic implications
1. Introduction
Language transfer - positive or negative?
2. Deliberations on multilingualism and the multilingual mind
3. Language learning strategies
Anna Stwora, MA
Aleksandra Serwotka, MA
University of Silesia in Katowice

Research objectives
to lay emphasis on positive aspects of foreign languages already known to learners
to explore instances of cross-linguistic influence in third language learners
to evaluate the students' level of knowledge concerning language transfer and its didactic application
Methodological inquiries
multilingualism ≠ native-like competence (Otwinowska, 2015)
the question of language level
plurilingual approach - pragmatic aspects of communication (Kucharczyk, 2015b)
language user/language learner (Cook 2008)
bilingualism ≠ multilingualism (de Angelis 2007)
Cross-linguistic influence
(CLI, language transfer)
“The influence of at least one (inter)language on any other language (or interlanguage)”

(Chłopek, 2011: 21, translation: A. Serwotka).
intralingual/interlingual
various dimensions
psychotypology

positive/negative
Multilingual teaching and learning
Plurilingual approach (Kucharczyk, 2015a):
intercultural approach
openness to languages (fr. éveil aux langues)
integrated didactic approach
intercomprehension

Metalinguistic awareness:
strategies pertinent to cognates and internationalisms
Theoretical aspects and general classification
strategy
- conscious preparation of plans with a view to solving a given problem or attaining a particular objective (Reber, 2000: 711)
language learning strategy
- various techniques applied in order to better internalise and use a foreign language (Studenska, 2005)
Language learning strategy system
Adapted from Oxford (1990: 18)
Transfer as a language learning strategy in multilingual students (1)
transfer and contrastive analysis - closely related/mutually dependent
similarities/differences between languages
compensation strategy
Translingual phenomena on the example of English and French
Unrelated languages
typological proximity of languages - not always a decisive factor (Ringbom, 2007)
cognitive strategy in language learning
Transfer as a language learning strategy in multilingual students (2)
4. Analysing the survey
Describing the informants and their educational profile
56 students of the University of Silesia being L3 learners
32 students of the first, 14 of the second, and 10 of the third grade
50 females and 6 males
19-22 years of age
Applied languages (translation programme with English and French); Philology: Applied languages (translation programme with English and Italian); English Philology: Translation programme with German; and English Philology: Teacher’s course with German
Research context and tools
internet survey designed by means of Google Docs
general introductory questions (concerning their sex, age, grade, and course of studies, as well as the foreign languages they know or study)
questions about language acquaintance and L3 learning
questions relating to language transfer
Results
Students’ responses as to the foreign languages they know or study
Informants’ assessment of their language level for their L2 and L3
How often do you use your L2 (English) while studying L3 (French, Italian or German)? 1 – never 2 – seldom 3 – from time to time 4 – often 5 – very often
How often do you use English while learning vocabulary in L3? 1 – never 2 – seldom 3 – from time to time 4 – often 5 – very often
Do you think that your knowledge of English can inhibit learning/understanding another foreign language?
- I encounter problems when it comes to fluent speech production - I tend to use English vocabulary;
- false friends, i.e. words that have a similar form, e.g. ‘cold’ in English for ‘cold’ and ‘caldo’ in Italian for ‘hot;’
- incorrect spelling;
- incorrect pronunciation, e.g. ‘r’ in German comes to resemble ‘r’ in English;
- counting to 10 in two different languages: confusing or substitution of numbers;
- English words are more accessible in my mind;
- I happen to create words in French that resemble their assumed English counterparts in spite of the fact that the proper words in French have different forms;
- pronunciation, especially when it comes to words with many vowels that sound different in Italian;
- confusing tenses and sentence construction.

Specific difficulties
Do you think that your knowledge of English can facilitate learning/understanding another foreign language?
Students' comments - examples
- many words in English comes from Latin, which results in some similarities to Italian; many times my knowledge of Italian facilitated comprehension of the English language and vice versa because I can guess the word’s meaning in Italian basing on the English counterpart;
- when it comes to English and French, many vocabulary items are similar - there are many resemblances between English and French, that is why they are easy to remember;
- when I forget a word in Italian, I think of the English word with the same meaning and, if they happen to sound similar, I recall the Italian counterpart;
- similar vocabulary items; associating new vocabulary in L3 with similar words in English;
- it is easier to understand tense constructions if you compare them to their English counterparts;
- similarities between words in English and my L3 help me to remember words in the latter;
- some words in German come from English and, thus, are already familiar to me;
- finding differences between languages helps in language learning;
- studying French is easier thanks to similar vocabulary, which facilitates translation;


The frequency of teachers’ referring to examples in English while teaching L3 in order to point our to similarities between languages. 1 – never 2 – seldom
3 – from time to time 4 – often 5 – very often
The percentage of students familiar (blue) and unfamiliar (red) with the notion of language transfer
5. Conclusions and pragmatic implications
multilingual students should be made aware of any relevant resemblances and dissimilarities between the languages that they are acquiring, as well as metalinguistic concepts used to describe the phenomena in question
relatively low number of interlingual references
possible solution: distance learning
References
Full transcript