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Revision

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by

Sharon Marshall

on 26 October 2018

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Transcript of Revision

Revision
This ain't a love song
Catullus as Neoteric poet and proto-elegist
Collection made up of elegy and epigram (tender love poetry vs harsh invective)
Late Republican context - the need to be a
durus vir
Tri-partite collection ('marriage' section in the middle)
Lesbia and the language of homo-social bonding
Unity of the collection: Catullus' four loves
Try a little tenderness
Ars Amatoria
as shift from egocentric perspective
Was Book Three always meant to be there?
Shares characteristics with serious didactic (esp.
Georgics
and
De rerum natura
)
Seems to respond to lex Iulia
Promotes distinct ethical code for erotic sphere; appeals to old morality and criticises Augustus in one fell swoop
Destabilises traditional idea of female dress as reliable indicator of sexual morality
Blank Space
Propertius as ironic elegist
Sense of wry-detachment in self-mockery (alongside convincing sincerity); actor and spectator
Delusional devotion despite increasingly bad behaviour on Cynthia's part
Roman Callimachus; the pure fountainhead
DIY
The real women behind the pseudonyms
Lesbia as Clodia Metelli (but Lesbia's sparrow)
Pseudonyms recall cult titles of Apollo, god of poetry
Lycoris as
dura puella
The status of the mistress
The
scripta puella
French Lessons
Short, time-bound genre
Defined by elegiac metre
Relationship with epigram
Subversiveness vs traditionalism
The Augustan context
Would I lie to you?
Gallus as the missing link between Catullus and the later elegists
Lycoris former mistress of Mark Antony
Gallus defeated Antony and made prefect of Egypt as reward
Offended Augustus and committed suicide
Recognisable elements of elegy in the Gallus fragment (the real one)
Clear resonance of Gallus in Propertius
Dead from the waist down
Propertius' polemical mention of Perusia
The apparent pressure from Maecenas
Criticism of Maecenas himself
Moments of compliance
Fever
Dream-like quality
Scholars struggle to understand lack of coherence in Tibullus' collection
Loose unity in the series of associations/oppositions drawn
Patronised by Messalla (whom he accompanied on campaign)
No direct reference to Augustus
Book One vs Book Two
Something changed
Ovid a generation younger than other elegists; less affected by Civil War
Almost entire corpus as experiment in elegy
Meta-poetic element evident from the beginning of the
Amores
Playful twists on familiar tropes
Self-conscious treatment of predecessors (e.g. dead parrot poem)
Teases reader with denial of knowledge
Personal politics; mocks imperial attempts to control behaviour
Both sides now
Which are the Sulpicia poems?
Theories of authorship; four poets and a poetess?
Sulpicia as niece of Messalla
Unique perspective as subject and object of erotic discourse
Comparison with male elegists
Comaprison with elegiac mistresses
A female voice?
Fragmentary, non-narrated story
What is at stake?
Texts
You should focus your revision on the following sections from which the gobbets will be taken:
Catullus 1-8, 61-101
Tibullus, Book One
Propertius, Book One
Ovid,
Amores
Book One
Ovid,
Ars Amatoria
, Book One
Sulpicia 1-6
You are welcome (and encouraged) to refer to poems outside of these sections in your answers to both the gobbet and essay questions
Format
The exam is two hours long
You will be asked to comment on three gobbets from a choice of six
You will be asked to answer on essay question from a choice of four
Topics to revise for essays are:
Sulpicia
Gallus
The
puella
Death
Gobbets
You will be asked to comment on CONTENT, CONTEXT, STYLE and ANY OTHER FEATURES OF INTEREST
Before you do anything, ask yourself: why has Sharon set this passage?
Treat your answer as mini-essay with brief intro. and conclusion
Start with context and BIG themes, then move on to more detailed points (explain any mythological allusions etc)
Think about how the passage relates to the work as a whole
Include any RELEVANT scholarship

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