Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

The Nuns Priest Tale

No description
by

hannah taylor

on 10 December 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Nuns Priest Tale

She is the one telling the tale.

-Highest ranking nun known as Madam Egllantyne.

-Spoke french which meant she was high class.

-She was well-mannered and noble.

-Physical appearance: fat

-Modest and quiet.

-Dresses well.

-Compassionate

Prioress Nun
Rhetorical Devices
Simile:
"His bill was black and shone as bright as jet." (Talking about Chanticleer)
Imagery:
"lived in a small cottage beside a grove which stood in a little valley." (Where the widow and her two daughters live)
Allusion:
"What about Croesus too, the Lydian king, who dreamt that he was sitting in a tree, meaning he would be hanged? It had to be." (When Chanticleer gives an example how dreams really do mean something)
Rhetorical Question:
"Haven't you a mans heart, and haven't you a beard?"
Chanticleer:

He is a very talented rooster with 7 hen wives. He is considered the "leader" of the barnyard. One night, he dreams of an attack on him. He believes it is a sign. Since he is so proud if his singing ability, he is tricked by the fox.

Pertelote:
She is the favorite wife of all the 7 hen wives. She is very beautiful. She tries to explain to Chanticleer that there isn't anything to worry about and it is an unattractive trate to be scared life that.
Historical Context
The Nuns Priests Tale is one of the Canterbury Tales by the Middle English poet,Geoffrey Chaucer. This poem is a beast fable and a mock epic based on an incident in the Reynard Cycle. The Reynard is a literacy cycle of allegorical french, english, dutch, and german fables largely concerned with Reynard, an attribution of human form of other characteristics to anything other than a human being. The story of the Chanticleer and Fox later became popularized in Britain
By: Hannah Taylor, Mikayla Helms and Rj Chambers
The Nuns Priest Tale
The Moral Of The Story
The reason this tale was told was to inform you to not be so careless as to trust in flattery. The Chanticleer exemplifies this when he encounters a Fox. At first he was frightened, but the fox assures him that he doesn't want to harm him. The Chanticleer began to trust the Fox and takes his compliments. The Fox tells him to push his neck out and sing with his eyes because he loved when he sang. The Chanticleer listened and when he does he finds himself in a bad situation. The Fox grabs him and tries to run. This tale demonstrates that trust is earned and not given away too soon, and also that flattery shouldn't win
Setting
-This story takes place on a simple cottage farm yard

-Spring
Summary of the Tale
This tale is about a rooster and his multiple hen wives that live on a widows farm. The rooster, Chanticleer, is very proud of his crowing ability. He has one wife that he likes a whole lot named Pertelote. One night though, he woke from a nightmare that a fox attacked him. He then tells his wife Pertelote about it and she explains how dreams do not mean anything and she shouldn't have to love someone who is fearful. He then tells her historical tales about people who have had misfortune in their dream and it had come true. But she still continues to tell him it's okay so he moves on.

Summary of the Tale
Soon after the incident, Chanticleer spies a fox watching him and becomes fearful again. The fox explains to him that there is nothing to be afraid of and that he came to hear him sing. Chanticleer begins to sing and closes his eyes. The fox then grabs him and drags him to the woods. Pertelote hears what happens and crys. She crys so loud that everyone in the farmyard hears it and starts running after the fox. Chanticleer tricks the fox when they get ine forest, and escapes to the top of a tree. The fox tries to get him down but he explains how he won't be tricked ever again.
Satirical Content
The satirical content in the Nuns Priest Tale is when the fox uses flattery and compliments to get the chanticleer to sing with his eyes closed so the fox can grab him and eat him. The chanticleer listens and when he does the fox grabs him and then the chanticleer has to use flattery to get himself out of it. This is satirical content because it shows how easily trust is given through flattery, everyone loves a good compliment.
Examples of Satirical Content
Fox
:
" Now, Sir, please sing for holy charity; Lets see how well your father you repeat"
pg. 162
*
The Chanticleer falls for this flattery and does what the fox says, then the fox sneaks up and grabs him.
Chanticleer
:
" Sir, if I were you, so help me God, I would say "turn back, all of you proud peasants" May bitter plague take you! I have reached the edge of the wood now: the rooster shall stay here in spite of you I will eat him, in faith and not be long about it"
pg. 164
*
Chanticleer breaks free



Fox
:
"I did it without evil intention. Come down and I shall tell you what I meant."
pg. 164
Chanticleer
:
"I curse us both, but mainly I curse myself, both blood and bones, if you trick me more than once. Never again shall you with your flattery get me to sing with my eyes closed. For he who closes his eyes on purpose when he should watch, God let him prosper."
pg. 164
*
This is the result of being careless and negligent and trusting in flattery.


Characters
Characters
The fox:
He is the one that captures Chanticleer. He flatters him to do so. Although, after he gets him in the woods, he is then tricked by Chanticleer and he gets away.


Questions
How did the Chanticleer get away from the fox?
Where does the story take place? (Setting)
How many hen wives does the Chanticleer have?
What does the fox use to lour the rooster in?
Give three characteristics of the prioress nun
What season does the story take place in?
Satirical Content
The church because the tale explains how the rooster has 7 wives but those 7 wives are also his sisters. Also, it talks about the nun however the nun has had intimate relationships with others and she also seemed very high class which isn't usual or "right" for a nun.


The church puts off an image from the outside that says it is Godly but nobody really sees what the inside is really about.
The moral of the story
The theme of the tale also explains the importance of dreams and what they really mean and to beware the advice of a woman.
Full transcript