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Digital Autodidacts

Six Simple Strategies for Self-Guided (re)Searchers
by

Laura Anderson

on 5 November 2014

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Transcript of Digital Autodidacts

CHECK CREDIBILITY
Consider Your Keywords and Search Strings
Digital Autodidacts:
Six Simple Strategies for Self-Guided (re)Searchers

BEWARE YOUR OWN BIASES
Move beyond
Google

GOOGLE
If you Google,
BETTER
Use Search Engines
specific to your topic
Internet Public Library
ipl.org
Break out of The Filter Bubble
Obamacare

Healthcare reform law

Affordable Care Act

H.R.3590 (111th)

What if you search for:
Effects
Consequences
Significance
Importance
Impact
Benefits
with:
The exclamation mark (!) finds a root word plus all the terms made by adding letters to the end of it.
Truncations
legis!
finds "legislative," "legislation" "legislator," "legislate."
Wildcards
The asterisk (*) holds one space for a character in a word or word in a phrase.
"Remember, remember the * of *."
"edit* content" finds "edited" and "editable" content
"run% finds ran, runs or running"
The percent sign (%) finds word forms
"better than _keyword_"
"reminds me of _keyword_"
"similar to _keyword_"
Find things you'll like
bit.ly/RhetProf19
Wiki's "complete" list of
academic databases and search engines
US Government Library of Congress
loc,gov
Yippy
(metasearch specific parts of Internet)
yippy.com
Internet Archive
(time-specific searches of changed or lapsed pages)
archive.org
Scirus (for scientific information)
scirus.com
"The first principle is that you must not fool yourself- and you are the easiest person to fool."
Oswald & Grosjean 2004, p 82–83
Any search for evidence in favor of a hypothesis is likely to succeed.
We set higher standards of evidence for hypotheses that go against our current expectations.
Disconfirmation Bias
Taber & Milton 2006 p. 755–769
Richard Feynman
Confirmation Bias
TRAIN YOUR BRAIN
agoogleaday.com
bit.ly/RhetProf20
“We found that a website’s layout or content almost didn’t even matter to the students. What mattered is that it was the number one result on Google."
Eszter Hargittai, University of Chicago
International Journal of Communication
"Assessing the Credibility of Online Sources"
bit.ly/RhetProf21
"Crap Detection: a 21st Century Literacy"
bit.ly/RhetProf22
Use the Internet like a detective
http://www.museumofhoaxes.com
Snopes.com
http://www.snopes.com
follow along: bit.ly/RhetProf16
Question everything
Faked
Real
How reliable is the source of the claim?
Does the source make similar claims?
Have the claims been verified by somebody else?
Does this fit with the way the world works?
Has anyone tried to disprove the claim?
Where does the preponderance of evidence point?
Is the claimant playing by the rules of science?
Is the claimant providing positive evidence?
Does the new theory account for as many phenomena as the old theory?
Are personal beliefs driving the claim?
Carl Sagan's “Baloney Detection Kit”
Full transcript