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A Big, Dark, Scary Journey with Commas!

Goes over the common uses of commas with a scary theme. Ran out of time before presenting it to my students so the scary theme could be worked on and enhanced for the end half. But it was actually pretty fun to do with the kids.
by

Chelsea Sanders

on 15 April 2013

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Transcript of A Big, Dark, Scary Journey with Commas!

A big, dark, scary journey with commas! Bell Activity A final review! Commas do not indicate a full stop.
They divide a sentence into readable parts.

Note: Have a reason for every comma you use! Commas Use commas to separate items in a series

Words – Some of the most famous monsters in movies are vampires, werewolves, and zombies.


Phrases – We ran over the river, through the woods, and away from the monsters. Items in a Series Subordinate clauses – We wondered who had been in the house, what he had wanted, and where he had gone.

Short sentences – We worked, we played, and we rested.

Note: If all items are joined by and or or, do not use commas to separate. Items in a Series (continued) If there are two or more adjectives in front of a noun, separate them with commas.

Ex. The Loch Ness Monster is a terrifying, gigantic creature.

Ex. The lake is green, wavy, and grimy. Adjectives Preceding a Noun 1. The twisted gnarled branches swayed in the wind.
2. The dark dingy musty attic seemed spooky.
3. A squat dark cooking stove stood in the corner of the old kitchen. Now you try! 1. The twisted, gnarled branches swayed in the wind.
2. The dark, dingy, musty attic seemed spooky.
3. A squat, dark cooking stove stood in the corner of the old kitchen. How did you do? 1. Find out who is going to the haunted house what we must take and when we have to leave.
2. We saw a ghost that floated wailed and glowed.
3. The fog lifted the sun shone and everyone was happy. Now you try. 1. Find out who is going to the haunted house, what we must take, and when we have to leave.
2. We saw a ghost that floated, wailed, and glowed.
3. The fog lifted, the sun shone, and everyone was happy. How did you do? Leaving commas out can be kind of scary! Use a comma after an introductory prepositional phrase if it is long or there are two or more phrases together.

Examples:
In the darkening attic room, the girls searched for the box of old clothes.
At night in the desert, the temperature falls rapidly. Introductory Phrases Use a comma after any long phrase introducing a sentence.

Examples:
Running from the bathroom mirror, Leslie vowed to never say the name Bloody Mary again.

To make sure you stay safe, do not walk alone at night. More Introductory Phrases Use a comma after an introductory adverb clause.

Examples:
When the clock tolled midnight, the ghosts came out.

Because it was still daylight, I was not afraid of vampires. Introductory Clauses Now You Try! 1. Staring at the gruesome ghoul, Skyler let out a shrill shriek.
2. Ichabod Crane rushed across the bridge, and the headless horseman gave up his chase.
3. To become a werewolf, you must be bitten during a full moon.
4. At night in the moonlit cemetery, the skeletons came to life.
5. Hundreds of spiders crawled down the wall, and the children fled in terror. How did you do? Grab your journal.
Choose one picture and create a dialogue between these people or characters.
Remember what we need for dialogue:
--quotation marks --indentations
--proper punctuation Flip back to your journal writing from last week.
Compare your old dialogue and your new one!
What did you learn about dialogue?
Did you use what you learned in your writing? Use commas before and, or, but, nor, for, yet, and so (FANBOYS) when they join independent clauses.
Ex. The full moon appeared from behind the cloud, and the man began his transformation into a werewolf.


Note: Make sure you can tell the difference between compound sentences and compound verbs. Compound Sentences http://video.pbs.org/video/2299677471/ 1. Staring at the gruesome ghoul Skyler let out a shrill shriek.
2. Ichabod Crane rushed across the bridge and the headless horseman gave up his chase.
3. To become a werewolf you must be bitten during a full moon.
4. At night in the moonlit cemetery the skeletons came to life.
5. Hundreds of spiders crawled down the wall and the children fled in terror. Use commas to set off appositives.
(appositive renames the noun in front of it)

Example:
The Rio Grande, one of the major rivers of North America, separates Texas and Mexico. Interrupters Use a comma to set off a mild exclamation such as well, oh, or why and words such as yes and no.

Examples:
Well, I think we should go see a werewolf in Paris.
Yes, I hate tarantulas. Introductory Elements Let's review! :)
Compound sentences:
1. Samara reached her icy hand from the well but there was no one there for her to grab. (Yay!)
Items in a list:
2. The tomb is filled with zombies coffins and dust.

Introductory Phrases:
3. After watching the movie 20, 000 Leagues Under the Sea I was afraid to go into the ocean.

**Bonus sentence: **
In order to keep vampires away you should stay in the sunlight carry a wooden stake and eat lots of garlic. Use commas to set off words used in direct address.
Ex. Sue, there is a ghost behind you!

Use commas to set off parenthetical expressions.
Ex. The President said, off the record, that he was deeply saddened by the horde of zombies. Interrupters The difference between:

Let's eat Grandpa!

and

Let's eat, Grandpa! Let's Practice! 1. Cindy's boyfriend the serial killer seemed suspicious at the beginning of the movie.
2. Jeremy what is that behind you?
3. The ghost pirate walked with only a slight hobble across the plank.
4. Did you hear that Courtney?
5. Dracula the most famous vampire in literature was written by Bram Stoker. Use commas to separate items in dates and addresses.
Ex. The delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed the Constitution on September 17, 1787, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
The Passover holiday begins on Wednesday, April 14, this year.


Use a comma after a salutation in a friendly letter and a closing of any letter.
Ex. Dear Aunt Margaret,

Sincerely yours,
Ms. Sanders Certain Conventional Situations 1. My friend just moved to 6448 Higgins Road Wisconsin Dells Wisconsin 25367 in January.
3. The party is Sunday June 19 at 24 Loring Place Yorktown Heights New York.
4. Dear Jean
5. Yours truly Now You Try! Ex. The address for my new house is 2489 Chauncey Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87747. Commas in Addresses Place commas between the road and city and the city and state. UNLESS you are writing on an envelope. It would look like this: List of items in a series
The circus had jugglers, lion tamers, trapeze artists, and even bears!
Compound Sentence
The black cat walked right in our path, but we didn't have any bad luck.
Introductory Phrases
If you hate blood and gore, you should avoid going to see scary movies like Evil Dead.
Adjective Preceding a Noun
The dark, creaky, ancient house was supposedly haunted.
Interrupters
Vincent Van Gogh, one of the most famous painters in history, is also famous for cutting off his ear.
Directly Addressing Someone
Go the the chalkboard, Frank, and write down the correct answer.
Introductory Elements
Yes, I think we should go to bed early tonight.
Conventional Uses
My 18th birthday will fall on Saturday, June 15, 2017.
Once we move, our new address will be 200 Rhino Road, Lily, Connecticut 98723.
Quotes
"No, you're not allowed to walk back from the movie alone," his mother replied.
Full transcript