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Negotiation By Design (Fall 2016) :: Negotiation Canvas

A Design Approach to Negotiation

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Transcript of Negotiation By Design (Fall 2016) :: Negotiation Canvas

Workshop @ Google Tech Corners, February 2016
Second Mover
Silence
Third-Party Player
Walkaway
Anchoring
Audience Effect
Authority
Better Alternatives
Coalitions
Cognitive Biases
Concession Patterns
Consensus Building
Culture
Decide & Defend
Distributive Approach (zero-sum)
Ethics
Externalities
First Mover
Framing
Gifts
Impasse
Integrative Approach (expand the pie)
Leverage
Reciprocity
bit.ly/NxD-052516
David W. Johnson
Leticia Britos Cavagnaro
Negotiation Canvas
A Design Approach to Negotiation
fact here
inference here
hypothesis here
Strategy/Tactics Mapping with the
Negotiation Canvas
You are Allison, a programming manager with a software company
, heading a five-person team. There are six other (male) programming managers in your division, each has his own team. All of you are direct reports to
Jamie Jackson, VP of Programming
, who hired you....
Over protest from the others, Jamie gave you the Casino project.
Jamie has not given you one word of encouragement.
Jamie seems intent on actively avoiding you.
Jamie feels pressured by the negative opinions of other managers.
Jamie wonders if she made the right decision in giving you the project.
Jamie feels guilty about not managing the current turmoil better.
Jamie wants to preserve harmony among managers at all costs.
From the list titled “TACTICAL FACTORS”, students select any number of factors relevant to their chosen negotiation strategy, and place them in the outer circle of the canvas. If desired, one or more factors not on the list can be included.
Finally, students build out
relationships between or among the chosen elements and factors
to create a free-form
map for their negotiation plan
. If necessary, one or more additional elements or factors can be incorporated. On the other hand, not all the elements or factors chosen in the previous steps need to be included in the final map.
Development and Testing
David W. Johnson :: Leticia Britos Cavagnaro
Thanks!
david.johnson@law.stanford.edu leticia@dschool.stanford.edu
Taking into account the motivations and needs derived from step 1, students start crafting their Negotiation Canvas, which in its initial stage is composed of 2 concentric circles. From the list titled “STRATEGY ELEMENTS”, students select up to two elements, copy each onto a post-it and place it/them in the center circle of the canvas. If desired, one element not on the list can be included.
Culture
Emotion
Fairness
Relationships
Style
Trust
Interests
Power
Rational Actor
Distributive (zero-sum)
Information
Integrative (expand the pie)
Students read an assigned role in a simulated negotiation scenario (A) and infer needs and motivations on their counterpart by using an empathy map(B); and Why-How laddering (C).
A
B
C
Anchoring
Audience Effect
Authority
Distributive Approach (zero-sum)
Ethics
Externalities
Consensus Building
Culture
Decide& Defend
Better Alternatives
Coalitions
Cognitive Biases
Concession Patterns
First Mover
Framing
Gifts
Impasse
Integrative Approach
Leverage
Reciprocity
Second Mover
Silence
Third-party Player
Walkaway
Goal
The Negotiation Canvas aims at dispeling the
false sense of certainty
that current negotiation methods foster.
Students explaining their Negotiation Canvas
JAMIE NEEDS....
Full transcript