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Color Theory week 1.2

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Miguel Elizalde

on 26 November 2018

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Transcript of Color Theory week 1.2

A little bit about myself
BA 1994 University of the Basque Country, Spain.

BA 1995 University of the Basque Country, Spain.

MA 1997 The School Agency, Spain.

MFA 2010 Rhode Island School of Design (RISD).

2010 Brown University Certificate.
Miguel Elizalde
Exhibited in Spain, USA and Korea.
Immersive Installations & Video Art.
Interest in the role of the body sensations in the perceptive process.
Currently working on the presence of infrasound in public spaces
Research
Urban Infrasound
Thank you.
Born in San Sebastian, Spain.
Currently living in Brooklyn, NY.
Electrochromic glass & Seismograph & OSC
Bio
Commercial Work
Art Research
Influences
Physical Sensations
Architecture
Process

http://web.airmore.com/
Out of the
Box
Screen
http://elizaldemiguel.com/
http://elizaldemiguel.com/
Process
Artwork
“The future belongs to a very different kind of person with a very different kind of mind—creators and empathizers, pattern recognizers, and meaning art_blocksmakers. These people—artists, inventors, designers, storytellers, caregivers, consolers, big picture thinkers–will now reap society’s richest rewards and share its greatest joys.”

— Daniel H. Pink

A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age
Physical Sensations
Architecture
Research
Dentsu, Spain
BBDO, Spain & Netherlands
Villarrosas, Spain
KesselsKramer, Netherlands
PerfectFools, Sweden
DDB, Poland
Wing, USA
Agencies
Clients
Commercial work
Process

Personal Introduction
Syllabus
Color/Groups
Lecture
In class-exercise
Syllabus
Participation ---->
Assignments----->
Group Final Project---->
Final Project Presentation---->
10%
60%
10%
20%
Syllabus
Schedule
8:00-08:50 Lecture
08:50-09:00 Break
09:00-09:50 Video/Reading Group Discussion
09:50-10:00 Break
10:00-10:50 In-class Exercise
Syllabus
Assignments---->
60 %
Assignment 1 ----->
Assignment 2 ----->
Assignment 3 ----->
Assignment 4 ----->
Assignment 5 ----->
12 %
12 %
12 %
12 %
12 %
Syllabus
Participation---->
10 %
IF YOU USE THE TERMINOLOGY WE LEARNT DURING THE COURSE AND YOUR COMMENTS IMPROVE THE PROJECTS WE ARE REVIEWING, YOU HAVE A 90/100
IF YOU USE THE RIGHT TERMS BUT DON’T SHOW HOW TO APPLY THEM TO IMPROVE A PROJECT, YOU HAVE A 80/100.
IF YOU EXPRESS YOUR OPINIONS BUT MOST OF THE TIMES DON’T USE THE PROFESSIONAL TERMINOLOGY “I LIKE IT, IT IS AWESOME.” YOU HAVE A 70/100
IF YOU REMAIN SILENT DURING THE SEMESTER, YOU HAVE A 60/100.
Syllabus
Final Project---->
10 %
Submission and formatting ----->
Creativity----->
Execution----->
2 %
2 %
6 %
Syllabus
Final Project ---->
10 +20 %
Color Theory
week 1
Choose your favorite colour
Perceptual
&
Structural Colour

Week 1
Week 1
Lecture
Understanding the basic physics principles that create the phenomenon of colour.

Understanding how we perceive colour
Syllabus
Presentation Final Project---->
20 %
Submission and formatting ----->
Research ----->
Clarity ----->
Performance ----->
5 %
5 %
5 %
5 %
Week 1
Recognize the main wavelength of each color.

Create colors by different methods.

Identifying the parts of the body involve in perceiving color.

Understanding how we make sense of color.
Effects of the imperceptible.
Dr. Alexander Schauss, Ph.D., director of the American Institute for Biosocial Research in Tacoma Washington, was the first to report the suppression of angry, antagonistic, and anxiety ridden behavior among prisoners:
"... It’s a tranquilizing color that saps your energy. Even the color-blind are tranquilized by pink rooms." (1)
1. Morton Walker, The Power of Color, (New York, Avery Publishing Group, 1991), pp. 50-52
The difference between addittive and substractive color.
The red, green and blue use 8 bits each, which have integer values from 0 to 255.

The wavelenght spectrum.
http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-wavelength.htm
Light
Energy
Kinetic Energy is the energy of movements: motion, atoms (sound, thermal) electromagnetic (light) and electricty.
Elements of a wave.
Frequency: The number of cycles that occur per second determines the basic pitch of the waveform—commonly known as the frequency.

Amplitude: The amplitude of a waveform indicates the amount of air pressure change. It can be measured as the maximum vertical distance from zero air pressure, or “silence” (shown as a horizontal line at 0 dB in the illustration). Put another way, amplitude is the distance between the horizontal axis and the top of the waveform peak, or the bottom of the waveform trough.

Wavelength: The wavelength is the distance between repeating cycles of a waveform of a given frequency. The higher the frequency, the shorter the wavelength. A 1000 Hz tone has a wavelength a bit under one foot. The wavelength of 440 hz is 2.57 ft.

Period: The (wave) period is the amount of time it takes to complete one full revolution of a waveform cycle. The higher and faster the frequency, the shorter the wave period.

Phase: Phase compares the timing between waveforms and is measured in degrees—from 0 to 360.
see speech, hear shapes, touch flavor, taste odors and smell affection.
Emotions are faster than thoughts.
The context is relevant (hippocampus).
Physical context and experiential context (past memories).
Week 1

Multi-sensorial improvement"
We use more than one sense to get information when an event is not completely clear.
Multi-sensorial suppression
Sensorial domination
There is always one sense that controls the others.
If one sense fails all perception fail
A descriptive philosophy of perception, our kinaesthetic, prescientific, lived-bodily experience and cognition of the world—the unification of our affective, motor and sensory capacities.
Phenomenology
Multi-sensorial memory
The world is not something external we merely contemplate but something we primarily inhabit, in which our mode of existence may be called, per Heidegger,
being-in-the-world.
http://www.imalab.net/video/experiencing-products-emotions-through-virtual-multisensory-prototypes
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• Light arriving at an opaque surface is either reflected "specularly" (that is, in the
manner of a mirror), scattered (that is, reflected with diffuse scattering), or absorbed – or some combination of these.

• Opaque objects that do not reflect specularly (which tend to have rough surfaces) have their color determined by which wavelengths of light they scatter more and which they scatter less (with the light that is not scattered being absorbed). If objects scatter all wavelengths, they appear white. If they absorb all wavelengths, they appear black.
Pigments are chemicals that selectively absorb and reflect different spectra of light. When a surface is painted with a pigment, light hitting the surface is reflected, minus some wavelengths. This subtraction of wavelengths produces the appearance of different
colors. Most paints are a blend of several chemical pigments, intended to produce a reflection of a given color.

Pigment manufacturers assume the source light will be white, or of roughly equal intensity across the spectrum. If the light is not a pure white source (as in the case of nearly all forms of artificial lighting), the resulting spectrum will appear a slightly different color. Red paint, viewed under blue light, may appear black. Red paint is red
because it reflects only the red components of the spectrum. Blue light, containing none of these, will create no reflection from red paint, creating the appearance of black.
The color of an object is a complex result of its surface properties, its transmission properties, and its emission properties, all of which factors contribute to the mix of wavelengths in the light leaving the surface of the object.

The perceived color is then further conditioned by the nature of the ambient illumination, and by the color properties of other objects nearby, via the effect known as color constancy and via other characteristics of the perceiving eye and brain.
The response curve as a function of wavelength for each type of cone is illustrated above.
Because the curves overlap, some tristimulus values do not occur for any incoming light
combination. For example, it is not possible to stimulate only the mid-wavelength (socalled
"green") cones; the other cones will inevitably be stimulated to some degree at the
same time. The set of all possible tristimulus values determines the human color space. It
has been estimated that humans can distinguish roughly 10 million different colors.


The other type of light-sensitive cell in the eye, the rod, has a different response curve. In
normal situations, when light is bright enough to strongly stimulate the cones, rods play
virtually no role in vision at all. On the other hand, in dim light, the cones are
understimulated leaving only the signal from the rods, resulting in a colorless response.
(Furthermore, the rods are barely sensitive to light in the "red" range.)
Structural colors are colors caused by interference effects rather than by pigments. Color
effects are produced when a material is scored with fine parallel lines, formed of one or
more parallel thin layers, or otherwise composed of microstructures on the scale of the
color's wavelength. If the microstructures are spaced randomly, light of shorter
wavelengths will be scattered preferentially to produce Tyndall effect colors: the blue of
the sky (Rayleigh scattering, caused by structures much smaller than the wavelength of
light, in this case air molecules), the luster of opals, and the blue of human irises. If the
microstructures are aligned in arrays, for example the array of pits in a CD, they behave
as a diffraction grating: the grating reflects different wavelengths in different directions
due to interference phenomena, separating mixed "white" light into light of different
wavelengths. If the structure is one or more thin layers then it will reflect some
wavelengths and transmit others, depending on the layers' thickness.
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In-class exercise
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Structural colour
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Structural colour
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/tv/2011/08/horizon.shtml
Week 1
Optional reading
Note: 1 nm (nanometer) = 10 m
-9
There are three types of cones, for small, medium and large wavelengths.
Each eye has 4.5 million cones and 90 million rods.
Change the color of three objects without modifying the pigment.

Manipulate the light reflected in the object to achieve that goal.
Week 1
Optional in-class exercises
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