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Claim, Evidence, and Analysis in Writing

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by

Jennifer Drew

on 24 September 2013

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Transcript of Claim, Evidence, and Analysis in Writing

Why C/E/A? Just as a lawyer supports his or her argument with evidence, as a writer, you must also support the ideas you have about the text you are reading.

Using claim, evidence, and analysis allows you to make assertions about the text, support those assertions with specific evidence from the text, and share your own insight on the evidence. The Big Picture:
Claim/Evidence/Analysis Structure Your paragraphs should be structured in this manner for every analysis. A paragraph outline is found below. Jennifer Drew Writing with
Claim, Evidence, and Analysis The Claim Why C/E/A? Using claim, evidence, and analysis gives your writing a purpose, provides structure for your writing, and allows for you to build a strong case. The claim is the point you are trying to prove, the debate you are trying to win, or the case you are making for the judge.

Your claim should be your topic sentence in your paragraph for a 1-paragraph analysis and the start of each body paragraph for a longer analysis piece.

Example: In The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, Rex Walls creates a fantasy world for his family to exist in to hide his addiction to alcohol.

The Claim The Evidence Your evidence will come from your text. It can be in the form of a direct quote, an indirect quote (paraphrased information), or a summary. Make sure to give credit to the source using a proper citation.

Your evidence should follow your claim in the paragraph. The Evidence Example: In The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, Rex Walls creates a fantasy world for his family to exist in to hide his addiction to alcohol. (found in red) In this fantasy world, Rex Walls has delusions of grandeur that he will provide for his family as his daughter shares, "All we had to do was find gold, Dad said, and we were on the verge of that. Once he finished the Prospector and we struck it rich, he'd start on our Glass Castle" (Walls 25). The Analysis The analysis shares how your evidence is tied to and supports the claim. It is where you share your interpretation of the evidence and what you inferred from the text. It is not a restatement or summary of the evidence. You are sharing why the evidence is important.

Your analysis should make-up the bulk of your essay. Don't limit yourself to one sentence of analysis for each piece of evidence. Example: In The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, Rex Walls creates a fantasy world for his family to exist in to hide his addiction to alcohol. In this fantasy world, Rex Walls has delusions of grandeur that he will provide for his family as his daughter shares, "All we had to do was find gold, Dad said, and we were on the verge of that. Once he finished the Prospector and we struck it rich, he'd start on our Glass Castle" (Walls 25). The Analysis (found in red) By creating elaborate plans for success and the future, Rex Walls established a fantasy world for his family that was unattainable. To survive their day-to-day lives, they held hope that one day they would have no rmal lives which involved the daily necessities that others take for granted. By holding out hope, the Walls family was willing to overlook their patriarch's overwhelming addiction. What is next?
Each claim should be supported by at least 3 pieces of evidence (with supporting analysis). If you don't have enough evidence to support your claim, you may need to rethink your claim. 1. Claim/Thesis Statement
2. Evidence
3. Analysis
4. Evidence
5. Analysis
6. Evidence
7. Analysis
8. Concluding Sentence
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