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Tragedy, Comedy and Tragicomedy

theatre 191
by

Glenda Miles

on 19 March 2014

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Transcript of Tragedy, Comedy and Tragicomedy

Drama: A Multi-Act Presentation
Heroic
Drama
Comedy
Bourgeois or Domestic Drama
Tragedy
We ask, why are people sometimes cruel to one another? Why is the world unjust? Why do we endure suffering?
Chapter 9: Tragedy, Comedy & Tragicomedy
"we love what the characters love, fear what they fear, and suffer what they suffer."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drama
http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons/Drama.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dramatic_structure
300
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposition_(literary_technique)
Tragicomedy

"One eye looks through a comic lens
and the other through a serious lens"
comic, ironic & tragic elements
can be problematic if comedy
pervades the point of view
Famous "timeless" tragicomedy by Shakespeare:
"Measure for Measure"

* from "Romeo and Juliet" http://www.shakespeare-monologues.org/plays/35?g=2
** from "Gladiator" http://www.monologuedb.com/dramatic-male-monologues/gladiator-maximus-decimus-meridius/
*** from "To Kill a Mockingbird" http://www.monologuedb.com/dramatic-male-monologues/to-kill-a-mockingbird-atticus-finch/
Modern Tragicomedy
--the best playwrights now use this genre the last 100 years

Theatre of the Absurd
absurd drama that subverts logic
highly illogical and innovative
existential point of view & characters
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aside
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representing domestic drama
replaced heroic drama
middle/lower class and family and home drama as subject
themes: family struggles, dashed hopes & renewed determination
Focuses on the everyday problems of the lower class such as: Poverty, sickness, crime and family strife.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protagonist
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antagonist
Melodrama-Music drama or song drama
History
Most popular in 18th and 19th C
The French introduced its modern form in late 18th C
Seen in almost every movie
Often times used to feed fear or horror
Can be applied to heighten the intended emotion
Used by directors and playwrights for a specific point of view
Presenters:

Cheyenne Rogers
Jeffery Engel
Ron Turner
Zane Fields
Adam Shumate
Glenda Miles
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comedy
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theatre#Comedy
Suspension of Natural laws
Types of Comedy
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Act_(drama)
http://www.ldoceonline.com/Theatre-topic/scene
http://shakespeare.about.com/od/thesonnets/a/what_is_a_sonnet.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iambic_pentameter
http://iambicpentameter.net/
https://www.google.com/search?q=iambic+pentameter&rlz=1C1AFAA_enUS485US485&aq=0&oq=iambic+&aqs=chrome.0.0j57j5j0j62l2.2064&sugexp=chrome,mod=0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#hl=en&tbo=d&rlz=1C1AFAA_enUS485US485&sclient=psy-ab&q=what+is+an+iamb&oq=what+is+an+iamb&gs_l=serp.3..0l4.818541.821314.0.821548.19.14.2.2.2.1.239.1588.7j6j1.14.0.les%3B..0.0...1c.1.1Zi1vnJkBoA&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.1355272958,d.aWM&fp=677d9cb28fc608b&bpcl=39942515&biw=1366&bih=643
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comedy
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/protagonist
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protagonist
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antagonist
http://www.google.com/search?q=what+is+a+soliloquy&rlz=1C1WYIB_enUS503US503&aq=0&oq=what+is+a+soliloquy&sugexp=chrome,mod=9&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foil_(literature)
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/211951/foil
http://www.wordcentral.com/cgi-bin/student?book=Student&va=pun
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pun
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/motif
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motif_(narrative)
Abbott, H. Porter (2008). The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 95. ISBN 978-0-521-88719-9.
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/170979/dramatic-irony
What is the Absurd?
Emotion Orchestra
[emotional expression:
NO words use only
sounds that conveys the feelings]
• "Tragedy Section"
• "Hero/Heroine Section"
• "Humor Section"
• "Sadness Section"
•"Absurdity Section"

Why not laugh instead of cry?
Comedy writers agree they believe that can get the same point across using absurd over compensation and crazy circumstances.
Types of Comedy


Modern Tragicomedy
--the best playwrights using
this genre the last 100 yrs

Few examples:
Uncle Vanya
Little Shop of Horrors
Edward Scissorhands
American Beauty

Traditional Tragedy
Modern Tragedy
Placed in significant periods of the past
Heroes used (kings, queens, nobleman, noblewoman)
Language is very verse; lofty and profound
Usually holds an extensive amount of meaning behind it
From nineteenth century to present day
Kings, queens, etc.. are not central figures
tend to see enlightenment, progress, and optimism to a sad ending.
Serious drama of any period
traditional and modern together
differs from tragedy in that the ending has a positive or optimistic world view even when the ending is sad.
also has a noble figure
E.G. The Three Stooges
Burlesque- relies on physical humor as well as gross over exaggerations and occasional vulgarity. Usually ludicrous imitation of othe forms of drama.
Satire- A more whitty, intellectual version of burlesque. Uses whit, irony, and exaggeration to attack or expose evil of foolishness.
E.G. The Tonight Show or the Colbert Roport
Domestic Comedy- the comic equivalent of domestic or bourgeois drama.
Mostly deals with family situations.
E.G. Two and a Half Men or How I Met Your Mother
Comedy of Manners- uses wit and cleverness to expose the social pretensions of the upper class.
Comedy of Ideas- using comic techniques to debate intellectual propositions and to further moral and social point of view.
Slapstick comedy- comedy the uses physical pain or any kind of raucous comedy.
Slapstick is one example of suspended natural laws because you do not worry about whether the person is hurt or not but about how the chain of everyday life day is broken

by mishap.

Farce- thrives of exaggeration including excessive plot twists and a broad range of physical humor. No intellectual pretensions, but aims at just provoking laughter.
Comedy of Character
In comedy the characters have discrepancy or they act or act like they think they are something that they are obviously not.
Full transcript