Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Christmas In Sweden

No description
by

Nat Janvary

on 16 December 2010

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Christmas In Sweden

Christmas In Sweden! Christmas Foods Eaten In Sweden
Typical foods eaten in Sweden on Christmas are Swedish meatballs, Christmas ham, herring, sausages, ribs, and sliced beet root. Some Christmas desserts are porridge, rice pudding, Christmas toffee, Gingerbread, and Saint Lucy saffron buns. Christmas in Sweden lasts from December 13th to January 13th. Christmas Traditions In Sweden The oldest daughter in each household wears a white dress and a crown with candles upon it. Then the daughter must serve everyone in her family buns and coffee. Another Christmas tradition in Sweden is to hide 1 almond in a bowl of rice pudding. Who ever gets the almond in their bowl of pudding is said to marry within the year. On December 25th (Christmas Morning) families wake up early to go to church. Families compete against one another to race to the church. Many years ago families had to race to church in horse-drawn sleighs. The winner is said to have the best harvesting. Interesting Facts I found it interesting that when the oldest daughter in each family serves buns and coffee that boys and girls follow her, singing traditional Lucia carols. The girls wear glitter in their hair while the boys wear Ginger cookie costumes or paper cone hats. By: Natalie Janvary
Full transcript