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The Relationship Between Glucose and Insulin

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by

Maria Barrera

on 18 October 2012

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Transcript of The Relationship Between Glucose and Insulin

Glucose meet insulin, insulin meet glucose. The Relationship Between Glucose and Insulin What exactly is glucose? Or insulin? Glucose is basically a sugar found in food. Its job is to provide energy to the cell. Glucose gets into the body through digestion. It goes through the mouth, into the stomach, and then finally into the small intestine. So how exactly does this "glucose" get into the cell? Now, glucose is absorbed and then released into the bloodstream by the small intestine and the stomach. Now, the glucose has finally made it into the body! The glucose tries to get into the cells but the cell membrane won't let them. The glucose is too thick. It can't get in on its own. Left Out Since the glucose can't get in, it roams around in the bloodstream. Until... Insulin to The Rescue! Beta cells, which are sensitive to glucose levels, begin making insulin. They order the pancreas to speed up or slow down the amount of insulin produced, depending on the amount of excessive glucose found in the blood stream. Insulin to The Rescue Continued! Now, the insulin attaches itself to the receptor cell wall. This allows an opening to be made. The opening,or the channel, is big enough for the glucose to finally enter. Now, the cell can finally receive the energy it needs to function properly. By: Autumn Shomo, Jaydon Nance, Maria Barrera, and Justin Lorenz Sources
Jagoda, R. (March 7, 2011). How Does Insulin Signal a Cell to Take in Glucose from the Blood. In Livestrong. Retrieved October 15, 2012, from http://www.livestrong.com/article/27924-insulin-signal-cell-glucose-blood/.

Freudenrich, C. (2012). Diabetes Overview. In Discovery Fit and Health. Retrieved October 15, 2012, from http://health.howstuffworks.com/diseases-conditions/diabetes/diabetes6.htm.

BD. (2012). How Insulin Works to Regulate Blood Glucose. In BD Diabetes. Retrieved October 15, 2012, from http://www.bd.com/us/diabetes/page.aspx?cat=7001&id=7244. Citations: If our presentation did not help, here's a little demonstration:
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