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Descriptive Research Design: Survey and Observation

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David Martín-Consuegra Navarro

on 25 February 2014

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Transcript of Descriptive Research Design: Survey and Observation

Descriptive Research Design:
Survey and Observation

Chapter Outline
A Classification of Survey Methods
Criteria for Evaluating Survey Methods
Advantages and Disadvantages of Observation Methods
A Classification of Observation Methods
ETHICS IN MARKETING
RESERACH
Overview
Survey Methods
Survey Methods Classified by Mode of Administration
A Comparative Evaluation of Survey Method
Selection of Survey Method(s)
Observation Methods
Observational Methods Classified by Mode of Administration
A Comparative Evaluation of Observational Methods
A Comparison of Survey and Observational Methods
Ethnographic Research & Other Methods
International Marketing Research

@marketingade
Observation Methods
International
Marketing
Research
Telephone
Traditional
Telephone
Computer-Assisted
Telephone
Interviewing
(CATI)
Personal
In-Home
Mall
Intercept
Computer-Assisted
Personal
Interviewing
(CAPI)
Mail
Mail
Interview
Mail
Panel
Electronic
E-mail
Internet
TASK
FACTORS
Sample Control
Response rate
Use of physical stimuli
Diversity of Questions and Flexibility of Data Collection
Quantity of data
-
Telephone
+
Personal
Interviews
-
Telephone
E-Mail
+
Mall Intercept
-
Mail
E-Mail
+
In-Home
Interwiews
-
Telephone
+
In-Home
Mail Panels
-
Internet
+
Interviews
SITUATIONAL
FACTORS
Potential for interviewer bias
Cost
Control of field force
Control of data collection environment
Speed
-
Mail
Internet
+
Mall-Intercept
CAPI
-
In-Home
Interviews
+
Mail
Internet
-
Interviews
+
Mail
Internet
-
Mail
+
Telephone
E-Mail
-
In-Home
Interviews
+
Mail
Internet
RESPONDENT
FACTORS
Obtaining sensitive information
Respondent control
Social desirability
Perceived anonymity of the respondent
Low incidence rate
-
Interviews
+
Mail
-
Interviews
+
Mail
Internet
-
Interviews
+
Mail
Internet
-
Interviews
+
Telephone
Internet
-
Telephone
Interviews
+
Mail
Internet
Structured
observation
Unstructured
observation
Disguised
observation
Undisguised
observation
Natural
observation
Contrived
observation
Mechanical
Observation
Personal
Observation
Content
Analysis
Audit
Trace
Analysis
They permit measurement of actual behavior rather than reports of intended or preferred behavior.

There is no reporting bias, and potential bias caused by the interviewer and the interviewing process is eliminated or reduced.

Certain types of data can be collected only by observation.

If the observed phenomenon occurs frequently or is of short duration, observational methods may be cheaper and faster than survey methods.
The reasons for the observed behavior may not be determined since little is known about the underlying motives, beliefs, attitudes, and preferences.

Selective perception (bias in the researcher's perception) can bias the data.

Observational data are often time-consuming and expensive, and it is difficult to observe certain forms of behavior.

In some cases, the use of observational methods may be unethical, as in observing people without their knowledge or consent.
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