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RI.06: Analyzing Point of View, Purpose, and Rhetoric

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Lauren Shassere

on 1 March 2014

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Transcript of RI.06: Analyzing Point of View, Purpose, and Rhetoric

RI.06: Analyzing Point of View, Purpose, and Rhetoric
Skill 1: Determine Point of View
POINT OF VIEW PRACTICE
Skill 2: Determine Purpose
Foundation
Common Core State Standard for Reading Informational Texts #6:

Determine an author's
point of view
or
purpose
in a text, and analyze how an author uses
rhetoric
to advance that point of view or purpose.

4. RHETORIC
1. POINT OF VIEW
Someone's
opinion
on a subject as it is shaped by personal experience, mindset, culture, and character.
2. TEXT
The
piece of language
an author uses to communicate his or her opinion.
3. ANALYZE
To
closely examine
the "parts" in order to understand the "whole" better.
VOCABULARY
The
art of using language as a tool
to effectively persuade, inform, or entertain an audience.
5. "I can" Statement
I can
identify
if the author expresses an opinion of the subject,
and then I can
describe
that opinion.
6. Objective
the black and white facts
7. Subjective
colored with opinion
8. Biased
showing unfair preference
9. Propaganda

deceptive or distorted information
10. objective
11. Support Your Answer
The speaker's voice is calm and he does not offer opinions or comment on the events.
12. Support Your Answer
The diction is largely neutral.
The speaker does not use strong adjectives or adverbs to convey his own emotion. He lets the facts speak for themselves.
If a text is both entertaining AND informative, it would be classified as an
informative
piece. Ultimately, you learn something from the text, even if you happen to enjoy yourself in the process.
RHETORICAL DEVICES
26. figurative language
RHETORICAL DEVICES
30. paradox
RHETORICAL DEVICES
34. hyperbole
RHETORICAL DEVICES
38. syntax
Skill 3: Analyze Rhetoric
PERSUADE
to
convince
the audience
The author's purpose is to convince the reader to . . .
An example persuasive text would most likely be
SUBJECTIVE
.
INFORM
to
educate
the audience
The author's purpose is to educate the reader about . . .
An example persuasive text would most likely be
OBJECTIVE
.
ENTERTAIN
to
interest
the audience
The author's purpose is to entertain the reader by . . .
An example persuasive text would most likely be
SUBJECTIVE
.
13. "I can" Statement
I can
identify
what the author hopes to accomplish.
20. Conundrum!
21. Identify the purpose of the video:
a) to persuade the audience to support human rights
22. Support Your Claim
Quotes like "
We
are brothers and sisters of this world." and "
You
have the right..." bring audience members into the discussion and make it more personal.
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
These 30 universal rights have been adopted by 192 nations - including the United States - as rights that everyone in the entire world should share.

Examine the student-friendly version and ask yourself:

Are these rights
fully
recognized
for all people
in the United States?

Discuss with
your partner.
PURPOSE PRACTICE
23. Support Your Claim
The
powerful words
are larger for emphasis and there are
pleasant images
like birds and a child swinging.
24. Support Your Claim
The appeal for support at the end provides a "face" for the document to make it more real and important to the audience.

People tend to be viewed as more important than legal documents.
25. "I can" Statement
I can
explain
how an author
uses
persuasive techniques

to support his or her
opinion
and
goals
.
27. allusion
28. irony
29. oxymoron
31. imagery
32. anecdote
33. analogy
35. juxtaposition
36. anaphora
37. satire
39. parallelism
40. personification
41. transitions
RHETORIC PRACTICE
"The very concept of objective truth is fading out of the world.
Lies will pass into history."
George Orwell
"Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it."
Alton Brown
"Darkness' is a subjective word; it depends what your viewpoint is and how you live life."
Taylor Momsen
“The eye sees only what the mind is prepared to comprehend.”
― Robertson Davies,
Tempest-Tost
"I might seem biased, but I use Evernote every day. It came to me through my readers, who I'd asked for software recommendations via Twitter and Facebook. For seemingly every function, the answer was
'Man, you have to use Evernote.'"
Timothy Ferriss
Full transcript