Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Shakespearean Sonnets

No description
by

Stacey Sweet

on 18 March 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Shakespearean Sonnets

What is a SONNET?
SONNET 116 - Shakespeare


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10
Let
/
me
/
not
/
to
/
the
/
mar
/
riage
/
of
/
true
/
minds
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Ad
/
mit
/
im
/
ped
/
i
/
ments.
/
Love
/
is
/
not
/
love
Which
/
al
/
ters
/
when
/
it
/
al
/
ter
/
a
/
tion
/
finds,
Or
/
bends
/
with
/
the
/
re
/
mov
/
er
/
to
/
re
/
move:
O
/
no!
/
it
/
is
/
an
/
ev
/
er-fix
/
ed
/
mark
That
/
looks
/
on
/
tem
/
pests
/
and
/
is
/
ne
/
ver sha
/
ken;
It
/
is
/
the
/
star
/
to
/
ev
/
ery
/
wa
n
/
der
/
ing
/
ba
rk
Whose
/
worth's
/
un
/
known,
/
al
/
though
/
his
/
height
/
be
/
ta
/
ken
Love's
/
not
/
Time's
/
fool,
/
though
/
ro
/
sy
/
lips
/
and
/
cheeks
With
/
in
/
his
/
ben
/
ding sick
/
le's
/
com
/
pass
/
come:
Love
/
a
l
/
ters
/
not
/
with
/
his
/
brief
/
hours
/
and
/
weeks,
But
/
bears
/
it
/
out
/
ev'n
/
to
/
the
/
edge
/
of
/
doom.
If
/
this
/
be
/
er
/
ror
/
and
/
up
/
on
/
me
/
proved,
I
/
ne
/
ver
/
writ,
/
nor
/
no
/
man
/
ev
/
er
/
loved.
Sonnet = 14 lines


How Do I Love Thee? (Sonnet 43)
by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

1)
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
2)
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
3)
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
4)
For the ends of being and ideal grace.
5)
I love thee to the level of every day's
6)
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
7)
I love thee freely, as men strive for right.
8)
I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.
9)
I love thee with the passion put to use
10)
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
11)
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
12)
With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,
13)
Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,
14)
I shall but love thee better after death.
Sonnet = 10 syllables per line
A
sonnet
is a form of poetry that:
-
has 14 lines
-
has 10 syllables per line
-
follows a strict rhyme scheme
-
uses iambic pentameter
-
helped make Shakespeare famous
"Judged by my Goddess' doom to endless pain" - William Percy

Judged by my Goddess' doom to endless pain;

A
Lo, here I ope my Sorrow's Passion!

B
That every silly eye may view most plain

A
A Sentence given on no occasion.

B
If that, by chance, they fall (most fortunate!)

C
Within those cruel hands that did enact it;

D
Say but "Alas, he was to Passionate!"

C
My doom is passed, nor can be now unactit.

D
So mayst Thou see I was a spotless lover!

E
And grieve withal that, ere, thou dealt so sore!

F
Unto remorse, who goes about to move her,

E
Pursues the winged winds, and tills the shore!

F
Lovely is her Semblance, hard is her Heart;

G
Wavering is her Mind, sure is her Dart!

G
Sonnet = strict rhyme scheme
Sonnet = iambic pentameter (a line of poetry that contains 5 feet (two syllables together) with one stressed and one unstressed syllable in each foot)
da = unstressed DUM = stressed
1)
da/DUM
2)
da/DUM
3)
da/DUM
4)
da/DUM
5)
da/DUM

SONNET 18 - Shakespeare

da / DUM da / DUM da / DUM da / DUM da / DUM

Shall / I com / pare thee / to a / sum mer's / day?


da / DUM da / DUM da / DUM da / DUM da / DUM
Thou / art more / love ly / and more / tem per / ate

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.
Shakespeare's Sonnets
-Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets
-Written between 1592 and 1598
-A majority of the sonnets (#1-#126) were addressed to a young man
-the tone of these was sincere with theme of love conquering death
-The rest (#127-#154) were addressed to the "dark lady," a promiscuous female that the author becomes obsessed with
-the tone of these was dark, dangerous with a theme of self-loathing

Although there is speculation about Shakespeare's sexuality, there is no real evidence that his sonnets were autobiographical
(Elizabethan sonnet)
Full transcript