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The Great Gatsby

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by

manbir sidhu

on 21 October 2015

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Transcript of The Great Gatsby

Daisy Buchanan
Nick Carraway
Jay Gatsby
Narrative P.O.V
First Person Omniscient
Told from Nick Carraway's perspective - also a main character
Important character trait: reserving judgement
Theme and Essential Question
Setting
Symbolize the poor and
and their unhappiness
East Egg
The Great Gatsby
Character Analysis
Plot/Conflict
Nick Carraway receives an invite to a party, where he finally meets his mysterious neighbour, Jay Gatsby
Gatsby asks Nick to invite him, along with his cousin, Daisy, to tea
Gatsby plans to pursue Daisy romantically, rekindling a romance they once had five years ago
Gatsby and Daisy's affair intensifies, meanwhile, Daisy's husband, Tom, is having an affair with a woman named Myrtle
At a lunch at Daisy and Tom's home, Tom notices Daisy and Gatsby's romantic gestures; the two men argue
The group then leave to go to town, on their way, Tom's mistress, Myrtle, spots who she thinks is Tom, driving, however it is in fact Daisy and Gatsby in Gatsby's car that strikes Myrtle and kills her
after, Gatsby awaits a call from Daisy (who already left with Tom), but when he goes to the phone, he is shot and killed by Myrtle's angry husband, George, as revenge for Myrtle's death (which was in fact due to Daisy)
There are several themes presented in The Great Gatsby.
The essential questions: Does wealth change the past? Does the american dream really exist?
Society and Class
The theme of society and class is presented all throughout the novel.
It is Gatsby's ultimate goal to achieve a high class in society and become one of the wealthiest men in America.
The American Dream
The corrupted Dream and the original uncorrupted Dream.
Gatsby sees wealth as the solution to his problems, pursues money via shady schemes, and reinvents himself so much that he becomes hollow, disconnected from his past.
West Egg
Valley of Ashs
Symbolize traditional moral and social values
Symbolize materialistic thinking and has less moral values
The point of view allows readers to interpret what Nick thinks of the characters. Our judgement is solely based on what Nick describes the characters to be.
Literary Device
Impact on Reader
Protagonist
Around 30 years old
West Egg
Impoverished childhood- Fabulously wealthy
Antagonist
East Egg
Married to Tom Buchanan
Object of Gatsby's love
loves money, ease, and material luxury
capable of affection
not loyal
Narrator
West Egg
Daisy's cousin
Gatsby's neighbor
Culture
Pathetic fallacy
Gatsby tries so hard to win Daisy's heart but his past gets in the way...
Gatsby and Daisy come from two different worlds...
The American dream...
Roaring Twenties
Jazz Age
“The day agreed upon was pouring rain” (page 89)
Rebels against traditional culture and music of pervious generations
Ending of the great depression
Prohibition of Alcohol
Time of economic growth
Secondary Characters
Tom Buchanan
Myrtle Wilson
Jordan Baker
George Wilson
“The next day was broiling, almost the last, certainly the warmest, of the summer.” (page 121)
Past and Future
Gatsby is haunted by the past.
You can't repeat the past. "Why of course you can!"
Youth and mystery
Depression ending the roaring twenties.

Tone
Perspective - alternates between how things are presented and how Nick interprets them.
Tone - changes for each character
Tense
The tense is past tense
"I lived at West Egg"
Truthful
Reliable
Trustworthy
"I am inclined..."
Effect of Narrative P.O.V
Brings forward a "class" system - Buchanan's and Wilson's
Brings to light the American Dream - Nick's focus on Gatsby
Full transcript