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The Odyssey

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Sierra N

on 1 October 2013

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Transcript of The Odyssey

The Odyssey
Book XIX:
Recognitions and a Dream

By: Sierra Nielson, Bailee
Trapp, and Emilie Wilcox

Why did Odysseus hide his identity?
He needed to take care of things, and it was easier for him to do so when nobody knew his true identity.
Why did Odysseus hide the suitors' arms (weapons)?
Odysseus didn't necessarily like the suitors, but at the same time he was doing them a favor.
Why did the suitors want to fight Odysseus?
What was the dream about?
The dream was about an eagle swooping down from the sky and killing all of Penelope's twenty geese. It flies up and perches itself upon the roof and delivers a message to the woman with the voice of her husband.
What was Penelope's reaction to the dream?
She was confused and did not know what this strange dream meant. She decided to open up to the 'stranger' and ask him for his opinion on the occurrence.
What did Odysseus say about the dream?
He states that the dream and the message from Odysseus is very clear. Death is sure to come to the suitors, and no one can escape the Odysseus' doom that is to come.
What was the contest?
The contest that Penelope declared was that the first man who could shoot an arrow through the holes of twelve axes in a line would win the title as her new husband.
Why did she declare a contest?
Penelope decided to have a contest in order to move on with her life and get a new husband. She has lost hope of Odysseus returning and thus declared that she would give her hand in marriage to the first man to win.
How did he react to her finding it?
He told the old woman to be quiet, while Athen distracted Penelope so that Odysseus' secret wouldn't be revealed. He harshly grabbed her throat and brought her to a vow of silence.
How did he get the scar?
The scar was a wound that Odysseus had received when he was young, hunting wilds boars alongside his grandfather, Autolykis.
What will the outcome be?
Why did Penelope question the vagabond?
Penelope tested the vagabond because she wanted him to prove to her that he actually knew Odysseus, according to all of his stories he has told her beforehand.
What were Odysseus' answers?
He explained the events that occured during book XIII and XIV, paralleling the stories he previous told to Athena and Eumaeus, however it is identical to neither..
What does Penelope test the vagabond on?
She tests the old beggar about Odysseus' clothing, his looks, and some particular of his company.
How was the scar found?
How did she react?
The scar was found by the old maid, Eurykleia, who was washing the vagabond's feet and uncovered the small wound.
Works Cited
Morrison, James. "A Companion to Homer's Odyssey". Westport: Greenwood Press, 2003. Print.
Preparing for Battle
He needed to find out what was going in Ithaka, and he didn't want to risk the danger of his identity being revealed. He also needed to be sure that Penelope was still faithful to him as his wife.
Summary
The vagabond, Odysseus, makes it to his house. Once he and his son, Telemakos, hide the weapons away from the suitors, Penelope confronts the strange man. She asks him many questions and tests him to be sure he knew her long lost husband. Once the vagabond has proven he knew Lord Odysseus, he is offered a bath from Penelope's maids. He reluctantly accepts, but wishes to be cleaned by one of the older maids. Eurykleia bathes the old man's feet and spots a familiar scar, immediately recognizing the man as her Lord Odysseus. After he is washed and cleansed, he is once again met by Penelope. She describes a strange dream she has had, about an eagle and twenty geese. Once the woman of the manor finishes her tale, she states that she will give up on finding her husband and declares a contest for her hand in marriage.
Husband and Wife Reunited
Odysseus' Scar
Penelope's Dream
Penelope Declared a Contest
Questions, Comments, Concerns?

She was joyous and so happy to see her master again, reuniting once again with his wife and finally able to kick the suitors out of his house.
The suitors felt if Odysseus returned that he would steal his wife back from them. They wanted to fight the man in order to obtain Penelope's hand in marriage and have her for their own.
He hid the weapons because he did not have any of his own and he didn't want them to get the upper hand if worse came to worse.
She tests the vagabond because she wanted to make sure that he actually knew Odysseus himself, rather than just hearing the stories that have been past around.
He also captured Odysseus' character so well as to bring Penelope to tears from hearing the tales of his husband and the details of his features.
Fitzgerald, Robert. "The Odyssey". New York: Farrar, Stratus and Giroux, Inc., 1998. Print.
Full transcript