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Indian Horse - Chapters 25-30

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Martha Currie

on 19 November 2014

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Transcript of Indian Horse - Chapters 25-30

''Mantitouwadge means ''Cave of the Great Spirit'' in Ojibway. That was funny , because it was mining that gave the town its life. Everyone in Mantiouwadge worked in the mines or the sawmills, and Fred Kelly had brought his family there from the Pic River reservation to join the thirty other Ojibway families who lived in a neighborhood on the outskirts called Indian Town by the locals.'' (99)

''Virgil was captain of the Moose.'' It's kinda like being a chief,'' he said. ''It's all about family and who you know. Garrett was captain before me. Kind of went down the line.'' (100)

'' The guys? They're not gonna take to you right away. ''Why?'' I asked. ''Couple reasons,'' he said. By now we were sitting at the kitchen table with our soup and bannock, real food that I ate hungrily. ''First is you're not from here and you're taking a spot away from someone else. Second is you're a sawed-off little runt and they're gonna think they have to protect you, stand up for you.'' ''They wont.'' I said. You'll have to prove that. My dad says you got a hell of a game, but they'll make you prove that too. It wont be easy.'' (100-101)

Plot
Characters
The Kelly Family
Plot
'
' I watched as they prepared. The whipping motion of hands taping knee pads to shins. Fists pounding pads into place. Grimaces as skate laces were drawn taut. The goalies prone on the floor, lying on their bellies while other players latched the pads to the backs of their legs. The Moose were like soldiers arming themselves for battle, and I stood there holding my new gear bag in my hand, unable to move at first. The feel of their energy in that tiny shack like ordnance built to explode.'' (101-102)

''My body hurt. But my pride gut more. Eventually, it made me better. Instead of following the play, where I could be bashed and bothered, I moved into the open ice, and they would not follow me away from the flow. From there I could ratchet up my speed. I dashed into the play and they couldn't catch me. I whirled and danced and darted with the puck. I didn't score another goal but I made three or four pinpoint passes that resulted in goals. I also didn't take another hit. There was no fear in me. There was no anxiety. There was only magic of the game.'' (106)

Martha, Gwen, Jaeda and Sophie
Indian Horse - Chapters 25-30
The Kelly Family had taken Saul into their home, and have been incredibly influential people in our section.
The Kelly Family
Saul & Virgil
"He was my greatest ally, I'd never done homework before or had teachers to pay attention to me. (114)
Fred and Martha Kelly
The Kelly's had bought Saul hockey equipment, such as new skates and a stick.

"I couldn't wait to hit the ice and see how it felt to be suitably attired." (101)
Harrison and Garret
They are only mentioned briefly and don't have a large significance to Saul's character development.
"Virgil sat up late with me and helped me with my lessons. He taught me how to present myself in class, how to fit in with the other kids, and tips and tricks to help me learn faster." (144)
Martha
is "a tall, spare woman" (100)
"married, and they were there with their wives and children." (100)
The Moose Hockey Team
This team, and the community has a lot of influence of Saul's character development.
Virgil, Buddy Black Wolf, and Ervin Ear.
The Moose Hockey Team
Saul Character Development:
Saul's Character Development:
"I stripped off my jersey and sat there breathing in the atmosphere of that small wooden shack. I was a Moose." (107)

"We never gave a thought to being Indian. Different. We only thought of the game and the brotherhood that bound us together off the ice, in the van, on the plank floors of reservation houses." (113)

"All of them tied together, entwined to form an experience we would not have traded for any other." (113)
Saul's Character Development:
"'Our secret weapon,' Buddy Black Wolf said." (111)

"You go somewhere when you're on that ice,' Virgil said to me after one practice. 'It's like watching you walk into a secret place that no one else knows how to get to.'" (115)
Determination and Motivation
The hockey team helps reveal Saul's character traits.
Themes
Motivation
Hockey
"The teams were their pride and joy." (112)

"But the ice was always smooth and well tended. Each host community took great care to prepare it." (110)

"Everywhere we went I was greeted with laughter because I was so young and small" (111)

"The rink was the place where our dreams came to life." (113)

"We were hockey gypsies, heading down another gravel road every weekend, plowing into the heart of that magnificent northern landscape." (113)
Question: Why do you think hockey was important to the native communities?
Motivation is exemplified in Saul's character development.
Theme
Challenge
"The things is, we wonder if you can win at another level. Against us. We want to challenge you." (118)

"'The Kapuskasing guys would give us a good game,' Virgil said.
'We already play good games.'
'Yeah. We do. But these other teams aren't exactly pushing us. Maybe we could be even better. There's only one way to find out." (119)

"The idea of the challenge excited my teammates and nothing I said could curb their enthusiasm." (120)
Fun Fact:
GP - 0
W - 0
L - 0
OTL -0
SOL -0
Pts - 0
GF - 0
GA - 0
PIM - 0
League:
NOHA
1961-
1962
Intimidation
"These were Indian boys. They may have been lumberjacks and mine workers when they weren't playing the game, but the concrete arenas and carpeted dressing rooms intimidated them." (122)

"They knocked me into the boards, and pinned me there with their bulk. But there was teaching in all of it. They showed me what to expect, and I let the game flow through me. I skated loosely and waited." (104)

"They made me work harder than I ever had to work. For a while they completely restricted my movements and I grew frustrated and angry." (105-106)
Sense of Belonging:
Question: Besides a sense of belonging, what
do teenagers gain from sport teams?
Friendship
More Information about Hockey in Native Culture:
Ice Hockey was first observed in Nova Scotia in the late 1600s. The game was being played by the Micmac Indians and being observed by the Europeans.
The natives called ice hockey "Ricket."
They first played using frozen apples as pucks, than they moved to carving them from cherry wood, before then to being the rubber pucks we know today.
The Little Native Hockey League
It started 35 years ago by Reverend Len Self, Earl Abotossaway, former Chief Jim Debassige, Norm Debassig and former Cheif Jim McGregor.
The first tournament was December 25th, 1971.
"It is a great honour for all of us to keep up the tradition of the L'NHL tournament started by these very special individuals. The first tournament had 17 teams and a modest 200 players in Little Current and today the tournament has grown over 2000 players." (James MacGregor)
To name just a few, the following communities have hosted the tournament: Whitefish River, Aundeck Omni Kaning, M'Chigeeng, Wikwemikong, Sagamok, Garden River, Nipissing, Wausauking, Dokis, Saugeen, Walpole Island, Curve Lake, Whitefish Lake, Six Nations, and Fort William.
White Fish River
Curve Lake
Natives in the NHL
The following is a list of NHL players that identify themselves as Native:
Arron Asham
Rene Bourque Kyle Chipchura
Vernon Fiddler
D.J King Dwight King
Cody McCormick
Carey Price
T.J Oshie
Jordin Tootoo
Vernon Fiddler
Arron Asham
Work Cited
OUR WORK CITED WILL BE EMAILED TO MRS. DENIKE AS A SEPARATE DOCUMENT, AND HANDED IN WITH OUR WRITTEN PACKAGES. WE ARE SORRY.
Rhetorical Devices:
Simile
"Those three-on-ones taught me to activate my vision as if it had a switch." (115)
"...but they would stand there and stamp their feet and lean closer to each other like penguins." (110)
Imagery
"We were hockey gypsies, heading down another gravel road every weekend, plowing into the heart of that magnificent northern landscape." (113)
Hyperbole
"We scored goals by the bucketful." (116)
"Five minutes left, and I was flying now." (126)
Rhetorical Devices:
Personification:
"But my pride hurt more." (106)
"I could see the hunger in him." (119)
Metaphor/ Personification:
"Trees became many-armed creatures looming across the road." (109)
Foreshadowing:
"'I don't know when I will see you again.'
'I know,' I said.
'You're free now, Saul. Free to let the game take you where it will.' (117)
Symbols:
Hockey
Question: What do you think will happen to Father Leboutilier?
Setting
Manitouwadge
"...thirty other Ojibway families who lived in a neighbourhood on the outskirts called Indian town by the locals." (99)
Kelly Household
"At home I was asked to help out with household chores. I'd been trained to work St. Jerome's. Anything the Kelly's asked me to do, I did smartly and well. The first time they thanked me for my efforts I had no words. Because of their own experience with St.Germs, they understood. Home life became an easy thing and I got comfortable quickly." (114)
Road and Rink
Setting
Kapuskasing Arena
"The town had spent a lot of money on it and when we walked into the lobby the first thing we saw were glass cabinets along the walls filled with trophies and photographs." (122)
Conflict
Conflict
Conflict
Culture vs. Culture
"When I handed it to the older man who stood waiting, the man looked at it and smiled. 'You got some pretty weird names here,' he said. 'Indian Horse, Black Wolf, Ear. You're kidding right?'" (122)
Saul vs. White Education
"I'd never done homework before or had teachers pay any attention to me. The idea of school as a process of grades and expectations was new and frightening." (114)
Saul vs. His Appearance
"'Thirteen must be the mascot!'
'No, no. That's papoose. Thirteen's their papoose'
'Hey, thirteen! You got a note from your mom to play?'" (124)
Saul vs. Native Identity
"I'd largely given up mourning the loss of my early life, those days on the land with my family. But the sadness filled me at times as we drove through the night." (109)
Saul vs. His Team
"Virgil looked at me hard. 'If the other guys on the team want to do it, we're going. That's how it's gonna be'" (119)
Research: Grandfather Teachings
Plot
''When I set it down under the bench and sat to peel my jersey off, they raised their own bottle to me silently and drank. No one said a work. They didn't have to. I stripped off my jersey and sat there breathing in the atmosphere of that small wooden shack. I was a Moose.'' (107)

'' People loved the game. It might be thirty below with a wind whipping across the surface of the rink and stinging their eyes, but they would stand there and stamp other feet and lean closer to each other like penguins. They'd stand for the length of the same, then scurry into the community hall or the nearest house to warm before the next game started. They were the hardiest and most devoted fans you could ever wish for. We played our hearts out for them'' (110)
Plot
''We never gave a thought to being Indian. Different. We only thought of the game and the brotherhood that bound us together off the ice, in the van, on the plank floors or reservation houses, in the truck stop diners where if we'd won we had a little to splurge on a burger and soup before we hit the road again. Small joys. All of them tied together, entwined to form an experience we would not have traded for an other. We were a league of nomads, mad for the game , mad for the road, mad for the ice and snow an Arctic wind on our faces and a frozen puck on the blade of our sticks.'' (113)

''Fred and Martha Kelly were good to me. They didn't try to be parents. They settled for being friends, and Virgil and I grew close.'' (114)

''I'd never done homework before or had teachers pay any attention to me. The idea of school as a process of grades and expectations was new and frightening.'' (114)
Plot
Plot
'' I'm proud of you, Saul.'' We were parked in the hall's lot by then and he grabbed me and pulled me across the seat to hold me close. I could hear his breathing. When he let me go I could feel his eyes on me. ''I don't know when I will see you again.'' ''I know,'' I said. '' You're free now, Saul. Free to let the game take you where it will.'' (117)

''We're not the same team,'' I said to Virgil one night. ''What's the problem with that? We're better.'' ''It doesn't feel better.'' ''You're just scared.'' '' I'm not scared. I just want it back the way it used to be.'' '' We've never had a chance to be great before.'' '' We were great.'' '' Against teams that couldn't push us.'' ''Great's great.'' ''Easy enough for you to say, Saul. But none of us have your gift. Think about us guys. Think about how much we'd like a shot at playing at a higher level. Think about that.'' So I did. In the end that was the only reason I decided to skate against Kapuskasing. I didn't want the Moose to fail'' (120)
Plot
''The town had spent a lot of money on it and when we walked into the lobby the first thing we saw were glass cabinets along the walls filed with trophies and photographs. It was like a shrine to their team. We stood there with ur gear bags in our hands, studying the display.'' ( 122)

'' Fred Kelly hadn't been able to make the tip. That unnerve theme even more.'' (122)

''They couldn't catch me. I straightened up fifteen feet in front of the net, dipped my shoulders, wriggled my hips an changed direction three times before lifting the puck over the sprawled goalie. Five to one. I barley went to the bench after that.'' (125-126)

Plot
'' Every time the Chiefs tried a rush I broke it up. Every time they worked to organize themselves I would rag the puck in a wild game of keep-away until their attack fizzled. The crowd shouted at them to hit me but I was too fast. I spun and dances and loop-the-loop like a daredevil. I skated like I had never skated before. I made seemingly impossible passes. I made moves that made the crowd roar.'' (126-127)

'' I asked a wrist shot. At the last second I turned my stick and pulled the puck back in , at the same time turning sharply so I faced back up ice. The goalie has moved across the net with me . I saw Stu Little Chief skating in all alone on the opposite side of the net and I hit him on the button with a hard pass. All he had to do was tap defenseman coming. He hit me hard and I cashed into the boards. When I clambered to one knee the Moose piled on top of me. I was pummeled and punched in joy and by the time we got untangled the ice was littered with debris. The crowd was standing and cheering, and as I skated to our bench with thirty seconds left in the game they cheered even louder.'' (127-128)

'' Guess you better start to if you're gonna play like that.'' Then the announcer's voice boomed out across the arena. '' Introducing the game's three starts. Your first star, from the Manitouwadge Moose, number thirteen, Saul Indian Horse. Indian Horse.'' I expected boos to rain down. But when I coasted out to take a turn around center ice, the applause and stamping feet sounded like thunder rolling around the arena. I looked up and everybody was standing and when I raised my stick in appreciation they cheered even louder.'' (128)
''At home I was asked to help out with household chores. I'd been trained to work at St.Jerome's. Anything the Kellys asked me to do, I did smartly and well. The first time they thanked me for my efforts I had no words. Because of their own experience with St. Germ's, they understood.'' (114)

''During our team practices Fred would sometimes send me out against three of the other players. They would chase me, hit me ,grab me. Every tie I touched the puck in those sessions, a boy was there. Every time I turned, someone was right up against me. It took a lot of work to find my rhythm under this kind of pressure, but I did it . Those three-on-ones taught me to activate my vision as if it had a switch.'' (115)

''Father Leboutilier showed up at a game in the Pic River that winter. It was late November, and we'd been playing for a month already . I didn't notice him in the crowd, but when we clumped up the ramp to the shack he called me from the side. I was surprise to see him . He looked different in his civilian clothes.'' (116)
- Respect
- Love
- Truth
- Bravery
- Wisdom
- Generosity
- Humility
Saul shows five of these teachings throughout the chapters.
Full transcript