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Copy of From A Passage to Africa- George Alagiah

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Hattie Hopper

on 4 March 2013

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Transcript of Copy of From A Passage to Africa- George Alagiah

A Passage to Africa
by: George Alagiah The first paragraph is mainly an introductory paragraph based on the whole passage. The second paragraph begins informative and ends with a more descriptive sentence, making it link more to the next paragraph. Near the end of the second paragraph, Alagiah says the little hamlet is "like a ghost village" The entire passage and the individual man that Alagaiah writes about is a microcosm of African Society. After witnessing the man's smile, George Alagiah repeats the word "smile" 10 times showing the reader that the man's "smile" really affected and changed Alagiah's thoughts. Another word that he constantly repeats is "pity". George Alagiah changes tone from how the village was disgusting and talking about death which is negative. He goes from being very descriptive and talking in detail to sharing his feelings about the smile meant to him. Alagiah also uses many different types of alliteration throughout the passage such as sibilance, dental alliteration and fricative alliteration. In the third last sentence, there is a section where the author uses repitition with the words 'Journalist’, and 'subject’, both three times. When Alagiah wrote the sixth paragraph, " And then there was the face I will never forget", he wrote it in a way that he thought would stress it's importance. By writing it as a single sentence. When George Alagiah wrote, ‘In the ghoulish manner of journalists on the hunt for the most striking pictures’, he related his job and the act of taking pictures to a hunt. When Alagiah wrote, ‘The search for the shocking is like the craving for a drug’, the writer uses drug addiction as a simile to show that journalists just want more information and can’t stop, like craving a drug. The quotation,‘simple, frictionless, motionless deliverance from a state of half-life to death itself.’ is another example of the language devices George Alagiah employs. The use of the triad emphasizes the point Alagiah is trying to convey. THE END Reading Question: How does Alagiah use different literary devices to emphasize his thoughts on the village? Writing Question: Write a short account from the smiling villager's point of view to describe the experience of the visit from Alagiah and express his feelings This passage makes most readers feel sympathy and possibly anger at the contrasting socieities and qualities of life around this world. However it is very difficult to make a difference with so many areas in need. The title "A Passage to
Africa" is ironic because
it is meant to contradict another story called " A Passage to India" which explores all the incredible and unique things of a foreign land. However, "A Passage to Africa" explores all the negative aspects in Africa which we turn a blind eye towards.
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