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Martin Luther King Jr. and the SCLC

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Tristar To

on 13 June 2013

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Transcript of Martin Luther King Jr. and the SCLC

What shaped the SCLC?
the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott of 1955 and 1956 led by Martin Luther King Jr. sparked the creation of the SCLC
other civil rights activists from New York, such as Bayard Rustin, Ella Baker, and Stanley Levison, who also assisted in the Montgomery bus boycott also influenced many of its ideals.
Founding of the SCLC
The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, or SCLC was first named "Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration."
With the help of other black ministers, Martin Luther King Jr. founded this organization in January of 1957.
The organization elected Martin Luther King Jr. as President because he played a large part of its founding and he represented the ideals and spirit of the group.
Notable Events
Montgomery Bus Boycott-
officially started in December of 1995.
Even though the SCLC was founded about 2 years after this effort, most people who took part and advocated for this bus boycott became members of the SCLC.
an effort where blacks would purposely avoid buses until they could sit anywhere they wanted to.
its success made Martin Luther King Jr. a national symbol of the new black activism in the South.
inspired other bus boycotts in other southern cities such as Birmingham, Tallahassee, New Orleans, and Atlanta.
Montgomery Bus Boycott
Martin Luther King Jr. is talking about strategies for the Montgomery bus boycott.
Work Cited
SCLC-LOGO. N.d. Photograph. n.p. Web. 11 Jun 2013. <http://www.detroitgospel.com/E-Blasts/images/SCLC-LOGO.jpg>.
"Martin Luther King, Jr." Civil Rights in America: 1500 to the present. Ed. Jay A. Sigler. Detroit: Gale, 2010. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
"King Jr., Martin Luther." Presidential Administration Profiles for Students. Ed. Kelle S. Sisung and Gerda-Ann Raffaelle. Detroit: Gale Group, 2010. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
Carson, Clayborne. "Life." Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History. Ed. Colin A. Palmer. 2nd ed. Vol. 3. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2006. 1239-1243. U.S. History In Context. Web. 3 June 2013.
Garrow, David J. "Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)." Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History. Ed. Colin A. Palmer. 2nd ed. Vol. 5. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2006. 2125-2126. U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 May 2013.
"Martin Luther King Jr. (left) talks about strategies for the Montgomery bus boycott in January 1956...." American Social Reform Movements Reference Library. Ed. Carol Brennan, et al. Vol. 3: Biographies. Detroit: UXL, 2007. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
Sprayberry, Gary S. "'One doesn't integrate on Sunday': the creation of the human relations council and the origins of desegregation in Anniston, Alabama, 1961-1963." The Alabama Review 61.2 (2008): 105+. U.S. History In Context. Web. 3 June 2013.
Birmingham 1963 . AmericanHistoryRules, Film. 11 Jun 2013. <
Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference
Martin Luther King Jr. is cheered on by many supporters when he announces the continuation of the bus boycotts.
What did the SCLC do?
The SCLC was the primary organization through which the southern black church supported the struggles of freedom for blacks in the 1960s.
It gathered southern ministers who believed that the black church had a responsibility to help other blacks through political ways.
It was created to organize and coordinate protests, such as bus boycotts.
King's Role/Impact in the SCLC
Martin Luther King Jr. made many speeches, lead many protests, and constantly fought to represent the ideals of all people for equality.
In 1960, Martin Luther King Jr.’s inspiration he gave as a speaker increased the SCLC's staff, budget, and program by sevenfold. Because of this, the SCLC obtained a full time staff after 1961 and with it, it planned out great protest campaigns such as the one in Birmingham in 1963 and Selma, Alabama in 1965
Even though some staff members focused their efforts for voter registration and citizenship training programs, Martin Luther King wanted to target areas of southern segregation, more specifically Birmingham, Alabama.
These pictures show Martin Luther King Jr. receiving the Nobel Piece Prize award for his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and leading the SCLC. He donated the cash award($54,600) to the civil rights movement.
March on Washington
August 28th, 1963
250,000 people marched in Washington DC to the Lincoln Memorial
These people demanded equal justice for all Americans
Martin Luther King gave his "I have a dream speech" here at the Lincoln Memorial
Work Cited Continued
"Some thirty thousand people, including Martin Luther King Jr. (front right, with wife Coretta Scott..." UXL Encyclopedia of U.S. History. Sonia Benson, Daniel E. Brannen, Jr., and Rebecca Valentine. Vol. 7. Detroit: UXL, 2009. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
"In Birmingham, Alabama, police used attack dogs to break up protests. Here, an African American man..." American Social Reform Movements Reference Library. Ed. Carol Brennan, et al. Vol. 1: Almanac. Detroit: UXL, 2007. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
"Martin Luther King Jr. is cheered by supporters as he announces that the Montgomery bus boycott will..." Government, Politics, and Protest: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, and Adrienne Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
Wall, Wendy. "Southern Christian Leadership Conference." Dictionary of American History. Ed. Stanley I. Kutler. 3rd ed. Vol. 7. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2003. 472-473. U.S. History In Context. Web. 3 June 2013.
Lewis, John. "Why we marched in '63; a movement veteran pleads for Dr. King's vision." Newsweek 23 Oct. 1995: 33. U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 May 2013.
"King Receives Nobel Peace Prize." Civil Rights in America. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 2010. American Journey. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
"Martin Luther King, Jr." Civil Rights in the United States. Ed. Waldo E. Martin, Jr. and Patricia Sullivan. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2010. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
"Martin Luther King, Jr., at March on Washington." Civil Rights in the United States. Ed. Waldo E. Martin, Jr. and Patricia Sullivan. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2010. U.S. History In Context. Web. 11 June 2013.
Selma to Montgomery March . RobertHJacksonCenter, Film. 11 Jun 2013. <
Albany Movement- occurred between December 1961 and August 1962. It was the first mass movement in the civil rights era.
Birmingham Protest- protest campaign during 1963 for desegregation and voting rights. It helped influence passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Selma To Montgomery Marches- Consisted of 3 attempted marches. Took place March 7, March 9, and March 21, 1965. It helped influence passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Notable Events Continued
Notable Events Continued
Notable Events Continued
Third Attempted March, which was successful
The Birmingham protests were one of the most violent. Police officers would use attack dogs to break up protest. This brought on national controversy.
Selma to Montgomery Protest
Birmingham Protest
By: Tristar To
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