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Superstition in the 1800's

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Jacob Burdick

on 30 May 2014

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Transcript of Superstition in the 1800's

Superstition in the 1800's american south played a key role in everyday life, because it made appearances on a day to day basis, in nature, and in death rituals.
Main Idea
Superstition in the 1800's
Most of the superstitions you would come across would happen on a day to day basis, for example:
According to livescience.com, if a cat were to turn it's back to a fire, a storm is coming.
If an unmarried girl sat on the surface of a table, she will then never marry, according to Aurora Blogspot
Lastly, in Tom Sawyer says spunk water can cure warts, Huck says "Talk about trying to cure warts with spunk water, what a blame fool way as that!" (Twain, 51) These are all example of everyday superstition.
Everyday Superstitions
An other form of superstitions were found in nature, for example:
If a butterfly lands on you and you kill it, you will have 1 year of ill luck, says John Redman from electricscotland.com.
When Tom has the superstition that if you put 2 marbles together, they would multiply “…with certain necessary incantations, and if you left it alone for a fortnight…” (Twain, 66).
Nature Superstitons
Finally, there were many superstitions related to death rituals. For example:
When someone died, all their mirrors were covered, because of the fear that the next person to look into those mirrors would die.
is when Tom & Huck hear a noise in the graveyard, and Tom thinks it Spirits around them. “A faint old wind moaned through the trees, and Tom feared it might be the spirits of the dead, complaining at being disturbed.” (Twain, 70)
Death Rituals
In conclusion, superstitions in the 1800's American south played an immense role in everyday life, nature, and death rituals. One could argue that we still have superstitions that we adhere to today, even in our scientifically advanced world. As we grow scientifically, I predict many superstitions will be replaced by scientific fact, as we gain more knowledge about the world.
Conclusion
A black cat. Digital image. Cocha Banner. N.p., n.d. Web.
"Aurora - Historical Romance: Superstitions from the 19th Century." Aurora - Historical Romance: Superstitions from the 19th Century. N.p., n.d.
Pappas, Stephanie. "13 Common (But Silly) Superstitions." LiveScience. TechMedia Network, 13 Jan. 2012. Web. 21 May 2014.
********NOT DONE********
Resources
Redman, John. "Superstitions of Nature." Superstitions of Nature. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 May 2014.
Resources continued
Full transcript