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The Metaphor Presentation

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Transcript of The Metaphor Presentation

by: Budge Wilson
Person vs Self

The initial indecent is when Charlotte says her first metaphor in Miss.Hancock's class. It leads Charlotte to talk to her mother about her about Miss. Hancock. The differences of their opinion of Miss. Hancock widens a already big rift between them.
The Metaphor
Setting
Theme
Physical
Emotional
Characters
Psychological
The Metaphor
takes place in the 1960s and has three physical settings.
Charlotte's Junior High- this is where Charlotte first meets her teacher Miss Hancock.

Charlotte's Home- The reader is introduced to Charlotte's parents

Charlotte's Senior High- Charlotte moved school districts and meets a new group of students.
The theme of the story takes an
overwhelming turn, starting with a happy and
"safe" tone, and quickly changing it to a feeling of immense regret. Near the beginning Charlotte, the protagonist, is still a relatively young child with a gift for writing and literature. At school she feels welcomed and inspired. Once she is in high school
and Ms. Hancock is teaching her again, she is
embarrassed and isn't willing to show her
appreciation to her teacher.
Theme
Soon after Ms. Hancock takes her life, Charlotte
is filled with a feeling of regret and hatred, for
herself. She always wishes that she had the gut to tell her old English teacher about how much she had inspired her, how she had helped shape the young woman she is now. Her mother helps intensify this feeling by showing no remorse for this woman and simply tells her daughter to "get over it." Along with regret, she also feels betrayed by both of her parents. Even though her father does feel bad about her, Charlotte's mother refuses him from comforting
their daughter
Initial Incident:
PLOT
Antecedent Action:
Throughout the story, Charlotte reveals her mother’s personality through her metaphors and through her thoughts. Near the middle of the story she has a flashback to a time where her mother would not allow her to create a “garden” because of the mess. This story helps us understand the past of Charlotte and her relation with her mother. At this point you can see that her mother was always the controlling one at the house and there was no use in arguing against her. This helps shape Charlotte’s personality into how she treats Miss Hancock later on.
Conflict/Crisis/Complications:
The main conflict in the story is Charlotte’s feelings toward her mother. Throughout the story Charlotte feels unwanted and uncared for by her mother. Her mother’s attitude influences Charlotte’s person as a whole, leading to Miss Hancock’s death.
Climax:
The highest point of the story is when
Miss Hancock walks into a bus (whether this was intentional
or not is left unclear and left up to the readers interpretation) .
Falling Action:
The falling action in the story occurred when Charlotte feels the pain of guilt from indirectly killing Miss Hancock. She feels a sense of responsibility for the tragedy that cause the passing of her once beloved teacher.
Foreshadowing:
Motif
Charlotte feels that she is not allowed to be herself in her home. She is constantly under pressure to live up to her mother's expectations. Charlotte also feels guilty about Miss Hancock's death because she was too afraid to talk to her.
Miss Hancock is very happy teaching in junior high, but when she moves to senior high she is laughed at by her students. She feels lonely with no one to talk to.
A recurring idea in this story is metaphors. Charlotte comes to realize she is skilled at writing metaphors and writes them when she has strong feelings about something. She did so with her mother. Her mother was prim and proper, but never showed Charlotte any love or warmth. Charlotte also wrote a metaphor at the end about Miss Hancock, because she still had a lot of heavy feelings about her.
Charlotte

Charlotte is a dynamic and round character. The story is presented through her perspective making her the protagonist. Her main influence in her love for writing comes from her teacher Miss Hancock. When she was introduced to "The Metaphor" she started to love writing. She made metaphors about the people in her life that influenced her everyday. While she was in junior high it was easier for her to be accepted by others, but as she grew older and moved on to high school it was harder for her to be accepted. She started pushing away people i her life. E.x When Miss Hancock comes to teach her class in high school she avoids her so the other students would not make fun of her.
Both Charlotte and Miss Hancock feel that they need to hide who they truly are because they are afraid how the other students will react.
Point of View
The only character we see from is Charlotte, who
has a dynamic point of view, changing from grade 7
to the 10th. From the beginning, her hostility and less than reputable view of her mother, who very much dislikes her daughters idol. Ms. Hancock can sense this but Charlotte is hesitant on admitting anything, if even she knows her opinion of her mother. Once she gets into high school and got in contact with her old teacher, she started to display shame and nervousness around her. Charlotte still liked her,
but the piers refuse her the ability to show
her gratitude towards her.
Charlotte feels like her mom doesn't pay attention to her, but still expects Charlotte to live up to her expectations. She describes her house as a place that is quiet and uninteresting because when she goes home she hides how she really feels from her mom
Charlotte's mother is a flat and static character in the story. She is cruel and heartless but at the same time she is flawless and a perfectionist. Rather than accomplishing things with love and affection, she focuses on completing things with perfection. “My mother is a white picket fence — straight, level. The fence stands in a field full of weeds. The field is bounded on its other sides by thorny bushes and barbed wire.” Through Charlotte's metaphor she explains that her mother may seem like a normal and perfect individual, she is really a bitter and judgemental person.
Miss Hancock was Charlotte's enthusiastic grade 7 and grade 10 teacher. She was a joyful teacher that had fun and creative ways of teaching. Her personality was always accepted by the students, but this method did not work when she moved to teaching in high school. Instead it was hard for her to even teach the students because they were always misbehaving. As she moved to high school, Miss Hancock's enthusiastic personality died off. She became a different person. This makes her a flat but round character because she is faced with challenges.
Miss Hancock feels depressed and isolated when she starts to teach at the high school. She loses confidence in her teaching style because of the students that are making fun of her.
During Charlotte’s first day of high school, Charlotte remembers the familiar face
of her once beloved teacher Miss Hancock, but chooses to ignore the person who had
previously accepted her for fear of being judged. This event may or may not have
caused Miss Hancock's death, leaving Charlotte with only regret and the
knowledge of what she might have caused.
Symbol
Miss Hancock, as much as she is an actual character, is also a symbol in this story. She represents Charlotte's new freedom. Charlotte had been raised under her mother's rules and has not really had a chance to grow and express her own opinions. That is, until she had Miss Hancock for English class. She was the reason Charlotte was able to come out of her shell and speak her mind, and she had opened up a whole new side of life for her.
Irony
Verbal irony is not really present in the story, and there is not much for dramatic irony, as the reader sees everything through Charlotte's eyes. The only irony being displayed in "The Metaphor" is situational irony. Miss Hancock is the reason Charlotte came out of her shell. In a way, she gave Charlotte new life. The irony here is that later on Charlotte was the one to take the life away from Miss Hancock. Charlotte could have helped Miss Hancock to adapt more to high school but she pretended not to have ever had any previous experience with her which drove her to depression and, later on, to step in front of a moving bus.
Allusions
There can be many allusions found throughout "The Metaphor". Early in the book, Charlotte makes reference to Estee Lauder, which is a company that deals with skin care, makeup, fragrances, etc. This helps further establish the stat of Charlotte's family's wealth or social status. Not a few sentences later, she also references Reader's Digest in how she learned from it that bathing twice a day can be therapeutic. Even before these, though, came the sentence "She wrote our metaphors on the blackboard and expressed her pleasure with small delighted gasping sounds." The fact that a blackboard is in use does not reference anything in specific but it aids in defining the context of the time frame the story is set in, further clarifying the setting.
Pathetic Fallacy
Charlotte made metaphors about her mother. "My mother is a lofty mountain capped by virgin snow. The air around the mountain is clear and clean and very cold. At the base of the mountain grow gnarled and crooked trees, surrounded by scrub brush and poison ivy." The air around the mountain is her personality, or way of life, as she likes to keep everything clean and she is a very proper woman, but she lacks the warm loving traits of a mother. Also, the scrub brush and poison ivy surrounding the mountain represents how her mother is difficult to approach, and Charlotte has trouble connecting with her.
Miss Hancock and Charlotte's mother are foil characters because they are the opposite of each other, both physically and mentally. They both impact Charlotte's life and her decisions in the story.

Charlotte's mother is perfect in shape and has a perfect lifestyle. She is married and has a daughter. Besides being a perfectionist, she has a very cold personality. She also seems to not care or support Charlotte's enthusiasm. While Miss Hancock is flamboyant (a noticeable quality that attracts people) and joyful person. She is not married nor does she have children, but she enjoys and cares about them. Rather then ignoring Charlotte's choices, she teaches her to embrace her passions and decisions. Her infectious personality makes her a more likeable person. When comparing the two characters together Miss Hancock has the traits Charlotte's mother should have, not only as a person, but as mother as well.
Main Characters:
Charlotte
Charlotte's Mother
Miss Hancock
Minor Characters:
Charlotte's Father
Julia Parson
Howard Oliver
Miss Hancock
Charlotte's Mother
Foil
Budge Wilson was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia and graduated from Dalhousie University (B.A., Philosophy & Psychology; Diploma in Education; Phys Ed certificate), followed by graduate studies in English at the University of Toronto.
Since 1984, she has published twenty-nine books, with twenty foreign editions appearing in the United States, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Romania, Germany, Italy, Greece, and Australia.
Her many prizes include:
seventeen Canadian Children's Book Centre “Our Choice”
Awards the City of Dartmouth Book Award
The Canadian Library Association's Young Adult Canadian Book Award
The Marianna Dempster Award
The Ann Connor Brimer Award, and the Lilla Stirling Award. .
Her story "The Leaving" was named a Notable Book by the American Library Association and was later included on the association's list of “The 75 Best Children's Books of the Last 25 Years.”
Budge Wilson
(Budge Wilson)
About the mother
"in bad taste," my mother said, "like the rest of her"

No indeed, I thought. No fights in this house. It would be like trying to down an angel with a BB gun-both sacrilegious and futile, all at the same time.

"My mother is a flawless, modern building, created of glass and the smoothest of pale concrete. Inside are business offices furnished with beige carpets and gleaming chromium. In every room there are machines-computers, typewriters, intricate copiers. They are buzzing and clicking way, absorbing and spitting out information with the speed of sound. Downstairs, at ground level, people walk in and out, tracking mud and dirt over the steel-grey tiles, marring the cool perfection of the building.There are no comfortable chairs in the lobby"
About the House
"My home," I said aloud, "is a box. It is cool and quiet and empty and uninteresting. Nobody lives in the box."
About Miss. Hancock
"And there's no need to feel funny about it. l don't want to push you even a little bit, but are you really sure you don't want to discuss it?" I could tell that she was feeling concerned and kind, not
nosy."


Foreshadowing:
About Miss. Hancock Contiued

And she would not have expected to find a friend in that particular classroom. By then, stripped of 15 years of overblown confidence, she offered her material shyly, hesitantly, certain of rejection, of humiliation

"Her (Miss. Hancock's) eyes merely held mine for a moment, slid off and then periodically slid back. There was a desperate hope in them that I could hardly bear to witness."

About Charlotte
"Therapeutic. Water play I read about it in Reader's Digest at the doctor's office. They let kids play with water when they're wild and upset. And now they're using warm baths to soothe the
patients in mental hospitals." "So?"
"So it could be useful if I happen to end up crazy." I laughed. I figured that would stop her. It did."

Theme:
In the beginning, the story is welcoming and inspiring. When she gets her job Charlotte feels a sense of shame and embarrassment. After Ms. Hancock takes her life it is nothing but regret and loneliness, as her mother finds her mourning ridiculous.
Plot: Events of the story:
Charlotte the protagonist of the story attends her grade 7 Language arts class with her favorite teacher Miss. Hancock
Charlotte shares a metaphor in class about her mother. Miss Hancock becomes concerned about her family life, but Charlotte dismisses her concerns.
Once at home Charlotte shares her day with her mother who disapproves of Miss. Hancock's because she is "brassy" and Charlotte's fascination with the metaphor .
Charlotte graduates from her grade 7 class and doesn't see Miss. Hancock until her first day of grade 10 at her new school.
For fear of being judged Charlotte pretends to not know Miss. Hancock.
Miss. Hancock becomes increasingly deterred by her new class.
She dies when she steps in front of a bus (whether this is intentional or not is unknown).
Charlotte blames herself for her death.
Charlotte writes a metaphor to represent her deceased teacher.
card report
Theme:
-Charlotte feels responsible for her teacher taking her life because of the neglect she showed her
Script
Characters:
Charlotte
- Charlotte is a dynamic and round character
- When she was in grade 7 she was not afraid to express herself
- In high school she was afraid that she would be neglected by her classmates
- She pushed away people in her life to be accepted
Miss Hancock
- Flat and round
- She is an overenthusiastic teacher
- Had a joyful and fun personality
- Got along with her students
- She teaches Charlotte to embrace her enthusiasm
- When she moved to teaching high school she did not have the same experience with the students in the 7th grade.
- During this time there is a shift in her personality
- She becomes depressed
Charlotte's Mother
- Flat and static
- She appears to be perfect and flawless
- Her perfections cover up her cold personality
- She is cruel and judgemental to everyone
- She does not care or support any of Charlotte's opinions
Foil
- Charlotte's Mother and Miss Hancock are the opposite of each other
- Charlotte's Mother has a cruel and bitter personality
- Charlotte's Mother does not to care about Charlotte's choices
- Miss Hancock is fun and joyful
- Miss Hancock cares about Charlotte's choices
- Miss Hancock has the traits that Charlotte's Mother should have as a mother.
1.The type of conflict in the story is Person vs Self

The initial indecent is when Charlotte reads her metaphor about her mother in class, and the conversation it leads to between Charlotte and her mother. Their differences of their opinion worsens their already tenuous relationship.

2. In the story Charlotte reveals her mother’s personality through her descriptive metaphors and through her thoughts. In the middle of the story Charlotte experiences a flashback to where her mother wouldn't let her create a garden out of her toys. This exposes a Charlotte's mother's attitude towards what she considers messiness. This helps shape Charlotte’s personality into how she treats Miss Hancock later on.

3. The main conflict in the story is Charlotte’s feelings toward her mother and how it affects her school life. Throughout the story Charlotte feels unwanted and uncared for by her mother. Her mother’s attitude influences Charlotte’s person as a whole, compromising her relationship with miss Hancock (this may or may not have have caused her death).

4.

The highest point of the story is when
Miss Hancock walks into a bus but whether this was intentional or not is left unclear and left up to the readers interpretation. During Charlotte’s first day of high school, Charlotte remembers the familiar face of her once beloved teacher Miss Hancock, but chooses to her for fear of being judged. after Miss Hancock's death Charlotte i left with regret and the knowledge of what she might have caused.

5. The falling action in the story occurred when Charlotte feels the pain of guilt from indirectly killing Miss Hancock. She feels a sense of responsibility for the tragedy that cause the passing of her once beloved teacher. She tries to cope with the tragedy by writing a metaphor in remembrance of her.

Setting:
Charlotte's junior high where the class loves their teacher Miss Hancock
Charlotte's home where she feels that she has to act the way her mother want's her to.
Charlotte's senior high where Charlotte and Miss Hancock were victims of peer pressure

Biography:
Born in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 19 Started writing in 1984, publishing twenty nine books. Received over twenty awards. Her story "The Leaving" was including in the list of "The 75 Best Children's Books of the Last 25 Years."
Motif:
Throughout the story Charlotte continues to create metaphors. These reflect her deeper feelings about things.
Symbol:
Miss Hancock represents Charlotte's new found freedom, as she was able to bring her out of her shell and introduce her to the world
Pathetic Fallacy:
Charlotte attributes her mother's traits to a mountain, as in her mind they share the same characteristics.
Allusions:
Many allusions can be found, including things such as Reader's Digest, or Estee Lauder.
Irony:
Essentially the only irony present here is that Miss Hancock was the one to give Charlotte her life, and in turn Charlotte took hers away
Point of View:
Views Ms. Hancock has her role model. Dislikes her mother because of her lack of understanding with her daughter. Ashamed to say she likes Ms. Hancock, as her piers show no respect for her.
Characters
The major characters in the story are Charlotte, Charlotte's mother and Miss Hancock. The minor characters are Charlotte's father, Julia Parson and Howard Oliver

Charlotte
Charlotte is the protagonist of the story, she is a dynamic and round character. The story is presented through her perspective. She is creative and loves to write. Her main influence comes from her English teacher Miss Hancock. When she was in grade 7, she was never afraid of expressing herself. She enjoyed making metaphor about the people in her life. As she moved on to high school, she is afraid that no one will accept her in high school. Back in the 7th grade it was easier for her to be herself around others, but when she moved to the 10th grade it became much harder for her to be herself. She even started to push away people in her life away. An example would be with Miss Hancock. When Miss Hancock moves to teach her class in high school, she neglects her so the other students wouldn't make fun of her.

Miss Hancock
Miss Hancock is Charlotte's enthusiastic grade 7 and grade 10 teacher. She was a joyful teacher that had fun and creative ways of teaching. When she taught grade 7 her students enjoyed her kind personality. However when she moved to teaching high school it was much harder for her to get to the older students. Her method of teaching did have the same effect that it did for the students in grade 7. During this time it seems that her warm personality started to die off, she became a different person. This makes her flat but round character because she is faced with challenges.

Charlotte's Mother
Charlotte's Mother is a flat and static character. She has a cruel and heartless personality that does not change throughout the story. Although she has a cold personality, she has a flawless and perfect appearance. Rather than accomplishing things with love and affection, she focuses on completing things with perfection. “My mother is a white picket fence — straight, level. The fence stands in a field full of weeds. The field is bounded on its other sides by thorny bushes and barbed wire.” This metaphor Charlotte creates about her mother shows that she may appear like the perfect person, but she really is a bitter person.

Foil
Miss Hancock and Charlotte's Mother are foil characters because they are the opposite of each other, physically and mentally. However, they are both role models to Charlotte because they impact her life and her decisions in the story.

Charlotte's Mother has is physically perfect and has the perfect lifestyle. She is married and has a daughter. Other than being a perfectionist, she has a very bitter and judgemental personality. She also seems to not care or support Charlotte's enthusiasm. While Miss Hancock is a joyful and pleasant person. She is not married nor does she have kids, but she does enjoy and care about them. Rather then ignoring Charlotte's thoughts, she teaches her to embrace her passions and decisions. Her infectious personality makes her a more likeable person. When comparing the two characters, Miss Hancock has the traits Charlotte's Mother should have, not only as a person, but as a mother.
setting
Physical
The Metaphor takes place in the 1960s and has three physical settings.
• Charlotte's Junior High
• Charlotte's Home
• Charlotte's Senior High

Emotional
• Charlotte feels that she is not allowed to be herself in her home because of her mom. She is constantly under pressure to live up to her mother’s expectations. She wishes that she had Miss Hancock as a mother. Charlotte also feels guilty about Miss Hancock's death because she was too afraid to talk to her.
• Miss Hancock is very happy teaching in junior high, but when she moves to senior high she is laughed at by her students. She feels lonely and betrayed, with no one to talk to.
• Both Charlotte and Miss Hancock feel that they need to hide who they truly are in high school because they were victims of peer pressure.

Psychological
• Charlotte feels like her mom doesn't pay attention to her, but still expects Charlotte to live up to her expectations. She describes her house as a place that is quiet and uninteresting because when she goes home she hides how she really feels from her mom.
• Miss Hancock feels depressed and isolated when she starts to teach at the high school. She loses confidence in her teaching style because of the students that are making fun of her, and this could have led her to kill herself.

Motif:
-Metaphors are recurring as they carry deep meaning for Charlotte
Point of View:
-Charlotte's point of view
-Ms. Hancock is her role model
-Dislikes her mother
Symbol:
-Miss Hancock: Charlotte's new free life
Pathetic Fallacy:
-Charlotte's mother's traits are compared to those of an icy mountain
Irony:
-Miss Hancock gave Charlotte life and Charlotte killed her
Allusions:
-Reader's Digest
-Estee Lauder.
Fore shadowing
About the mother
This first quote show the difference in opinion between Charlotte and her mom. and the conflict that will arise between the two.

The next quote shows how perfect and untouchable she seems to Charlotte, and how their seemingly perfect relationship is a lie.

Charlotte's first metaphor shows how her mother seems to be above everyone else, strict, unflinching, and disdains anyone ruining her perfect world. this foreshadows the rift that is created between the two.

About the House
The quote about Charlotte's house shows how it is just an empty box instead of an actual home where she belongs.

About Miss. Hancock
Miss. Charlotte is a kind and caring person and genuinely cares about her students, and this is shown by this quote (gesture towards quote). This also reveals part of Charlotte's and her mother's relationship since Miss Hancock is concerned for her pupil.

The next quote shows Miss Hancock's gentle and caring nature shattered by her unruly class. This foreshadows her death later on.

Very similar to the last quote this shows a broken Miss. Hancock looking for anyone to save her from her current situation.


About Charlotte
The last quote foreshadows the end of the book when Charlotte goes into a deep depression after Miss. Hancock's death and appears crazy to her less then understanding mother.
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