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Copy of Oscar Wilde

Grade Nine AP Culminating task Nicolas Bryenton
by

Radek Dán

on 16 May 2016

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Transcript of Copy of Oscar Wilde

Life
Born
1864
Enrolled at the Portora Royal School
1871
Entered
Trinity College Dublin
Enrolled at Magdalen College
1874
1878
Won Newdigate Prize
Recieved B.A.
1878
"Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught."

-Oscar Wilde
Arrived in New York
January
Sailed to America
1884
Married Constance Lloyd
1882
Sailed to England
December
PROSE WRITING
1888
1891
Met Lord Alfred Douglas
1891
Sued Marquees of Queensberry for criminal libel 1895
Wilde tried at Old Bailey Court
1895
Reading Gaol
1895
October 16 1854, Dublin
Death
November 30 1900
Life
The three literary genres
(works analysis)
Primary Source
The Happy Prince and Other Stories
"The Picture of Dorian Gray"
“The studio was filled with the rich odour of roses, and when the light summer wind stirred amidst the trees of the garden, there came through the open door the heavy scent of the lilac, or the more delicate perfume of the pink-flowering thorn.
From the corner of the divan of Persian saddle-bags on which he was lying, smoking, as was his custom, innumerable cigarettes, Lord Henry Wotton could just catch the gleam of the honey-sweet and honey-coloured blossoms of a laburnum, whose tremulous branches seemed hardly able to bear the burden of a beauty so flamelike as theirs; and now and then the fantastic shadows of birds in flight flitted across the long tussore-silk curtains that were stretched in front of the huge window, producing a kind of momentary Japanese effect, and making him think of those pallid, jade-faced painters of Tokyo who, through the medium of an art that is necessarily immobile, seek to convey the sense of swiftness and motion. The sullen murmur of the bees shouldering their way through the long unmown grass, or circling with monotonous insistence round the dusty gilt horns of the straggling woodbine, seemed to make the stillness more oppressive. The dim roar of London was like the bourdon note of a distant organ”
1898
Aestheticism
“Beauty is a form of Genius--is higher, indeed, than Genius, as it needs no explanation. It is one of the great facts of the world, like sunlight, or springtime, or the reflection in the dark waters of that silver shell we call the moon. It cannot be questioned. It has divine right of sovereignty. It makes princes of those who have it.”
Oscar Wilde


Is it thy will that I should wax and wane,
Barter my cloth of gold for hodden grey,
And at thy pleasure weave that web of pain
Whose brightest threads are each a wasted day?

Is it thy will--Love that I love so well--
That my Soul's House should be a tortured spot
Wherein, like evil paramours, must dwell
The quenchless flame, the worm that dieth not?

Nay, if it be thy will I shall endure,
And sell ambition at the common mart,
And let dull failure be my vestiture,
And sorrow dig its grave within my heart.

Perchance it may be better so--at least
I have not made my heart a heart of stone,
Nor starved my boyhood of its goodly feast,
Nor walked where Beauty is a thing unknown.

Many a man hath done so; sought to fence
In straitened bonds the soul that should be free,
Trodden the dusty road of common sense,
While all the forest sang of liberty,

Not marking how the spotted hawk in flight
Passed on wide pinion through the lofty air,
To where the steep untrodden mountain height
Caught the last tresses of the Sun God's hair.

Or how the little flower he trod upon,
The daisy, that white-feathered shield of gold,
Followed with wistful eyes the wandering sun
Content if once its leaves were aureoled.

But surely it is something to have been
The best belovèd for a little while,
To have walked hand in hand with Love, and seen
His purple wings flit once across thy smile.

Ay! though the gorgèd asp of passion feed
On my boy's heart, yet have I burst the bars,
Stood face to face with Beauty, known indeed
The Love which moves the Sun and all the stars!
Oscar Wilde
"I have nothing to declare but my Genius" O.W.
In 1874, Oscar crowned his successes at Trinity with two final achievements. He won the college's Berkeley Gold Medal for Greek and was awarded a Demyship scholarship to Magdalen College in Oxford.
POEMS
Poems, 1881 – a collection of decadent poems
The Ballad of Reading Gaol, 1898)



PROSE
The Canterville Ghost, 1887)
The Happy Prince and Other Stories, 1888)

The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891) - the only novel

TheRose and The Nightnilgale
Lady Fuckingham



PLAYS

Salome (1893)
Lady Windermere's Fan, 1892
A Woman of No Importance, 1893)
Ideální manžel (An Ideal Husband, 1895)
The Importance of Being Earnest, (1895) Jak je duležité míti Filipa
Full transcript