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"If Thou Must Love Me" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

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by

Elizabete Dudorane

on 6 September 2013

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Transcript of "If Thou Must Love Me" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The poem begins with the poet is expressing her feelings about how it is not superficial love she desires but it is true, honest, and unconditional love that she seeks. She does not want her lover to love her for her smile and looks because she knows those eventually will fade. Aswell, she does not want her lover to love her for the qualities that can be seen, which will eventually go, fearing that at that point her lover will not see in her what he once saw and will leave her. The speaker also does not want him to love her out of pity and sympathy because when there won't be anything for him to feel sympathy about, she fears he will then not have a reason to love her anymore. The poem ends with how it began and with a general message of how it is for love's sake that she wants to be loved, not for anything else.
Born in 1806 in Durham, England
At age 15 fell sick with a undiagnosable lung illness
Constantly on morphine
Very smart and study a lot
Read many Shakespearean novels
Got better, married Robert, and moved to Italy
Poet in the Romantic Movement
Lived during the Victorian era
"If Thou Must Love Me"
By: Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Presentation by:
Elizabete Dudorane and Jackie James
Per. 4
Rhyme scheme-
ABBAABBACDCDCD
Eye rhyme-
"Eternity"is an eye rhyme with "dry" and "thereby"
Meter-
Iambic pentameter
Sonnet form-
Petrarchan(Italian) sonnet formwith an octave followed by a sestet which indicates Shakespearean influence
19th century language-
Indicates the time period's influence on the poem
Symbolism-
Love is symbolized as something calming and wonderful
Hyphens-
Act as pauses and help the reader feel the poet's emotion
Enjambment-
Creates a sense of a rant and expresses the speakers frustration
Repetition-
"Love" is repeated ten times
Personification-
"Love" is personified (ex. "love's eternity" and "love's sake") expressing it's importance to the speaker
Her Life Story
Theme
Poem Summary
Poetic Devices
Works Cited:
Thank You!
If thou must
love
me, let it be for
nought

A
Except for
love'
s sake only. Do not
say
,
B
"I
love
her for her smile-her look-her
way

B
Of speaking gently,-for a trick of
thought

A
That falls in well with mine, and certes brought
A
A sense of pleasant ease on such a day"-
B
For these things in themselves, Beloved, may
B
Be changed, or change for thee-and
love
, so wrought,
A
May be unwrought so. Neither
love
me for
C

Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry:
D
A creature might forget to weep, who bore
C
Thy comfort long, and lose thy
love

thereby
!
D
But
love
me for
love
's sake
, that evermore
C
Thou mayst
love
on, through
love'
s
eternity
.
D


The major theme of this poem is that you should not love
someone for superficial reason,
but for the sake of pure love,
because most superficial reasons
will fade overtime which may cause
the love to fade alongside them.
{
{
Octave
Sestet
{
If thou must love me, let it be for nought
Except for love's sake only. Do not say,
"I love her for her smile-her look-her way
Of speaking gently,-for a trick of thought
That falls in well with mine, and certes brought
A sense of pleasant ease on such a day"-
For these things in themselves, Beloved, may
Be changed, or change for thee-and love, so wrought,
May be unwrought so. Neither love me for
Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry:
A creature might forget to weep, who bore
Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!
But love me for love's sake, that evermore
Thou mayst love on, through love's eternity.
"If Thou Must Love Me"
("Sonnet 14")
Began writing poems at 5 or 8
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Nickname: Ba
Died in 1861 in Florence, Italy
. "Elizabeth Barrett Browning." Poets.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Sep 2013. <http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/152>.
The narrator speaks in first person
The poem is from her collection: Sonnets from the Portuguese
Full transcript