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Malacañang

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Marianne Valencia

on 10 March 2013

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Transcript of Malacañang

Situated in the old Manila district of San Miguel
1000 Jose P. Laurel Sr., Manila City, Republic of the Philippines

a 20 acre lot including fields and swamps, lawns and fountains, flowerbeds, kitchen gardens, 5-6 good-sized houses in the grounds for the use of secretaries and aides, and large stables WHERE? “From Spanish decay to the enlightened era of Mother America." The Malacañang Palace HOW Inside the Malacanang Palace WHAT? WHY? Construction and Renovations WHEN? Spanish
Era Japanese
occupation 1942 – Japanese occupation made the palace empty, Quezon moved his seat to Corregidor, the headquarters of General Douglas McArthur The American Period Transformed the servant's quarters to what is now know as the Premier Guest House
Malacañang enjoyed its zenith as a repository of art, elegance and luxury, but gilded gates were closed to the public.
The verandah overlooking the Pasig River was walled up to become the new Maharlika Hall. Marcos
Regime Malacañang was once again open to the public President Aquino's
Takeover First Lady restored Bahay Pangarap and it became an extension of Malacañang Ceremonial Hall President Fidel
V.
Ramos Late October 1883 - Governors were not allowed to reside in Malacanang due to emergence of termites. Problem was solved by applying new coat of paint.

1885 - Flagpole was installed in front of the palace. Malacanang, in general, was already a "sick" structure. Decaying woodwork, stucked shell windows, roofs leaked, loose kitchen tiles, guard house and stables drooped. A total of Php 22,000 was spent for renovation and reconstruction

From 1869 to 1898, a record of Php was 300,000 spent. October 20, 1882 – Another typhoon almost blew down the place

November 5, 1882 - With the damage still not aided, another typhoon arrived. The Governor temporarily went to Intramuros The Malacanang was not considered very safe against the revolt of the Katipunan, since they are on the other side of the river in the Walled city. Malacanang would be wide open to attacks.

What Malacanang did not know was that its first defences were built by the very enemy those defenses were intended against. The contract for that north eastern stonewall was won by Moises Salvador, the constructor who was a Katipunero, and ilustrado.

Malacanang was the first casualty of 1896 Philippine revolution. The final five Spanish governors were no longer viceroys but merely soldiers trying to stop the twilight and push back the deluge. 1871 - flooding and repairs
1872 – An earthquake and typhoon badly damaged the framing of the building causing the Malacanang walls to become wobbly 1869 - An earthquake ruined Malacanang; it was then repaired in a hurry. Posts and supports were repaired or replaced; balconies reinforced, cornices provided for the roof, and interior refurbished. Was known as Rocha Villa, a 16 hectare land owned by Antonio V. Rocha. It is a casita (or country house) made of adobe, wood, with interiors panelled with the finest narra and molave.
November 16, 1802, Don Luis Rocha sold his villa to Don Jose Miguel Formento for Php 1,100 August 27, 1847, a royal Decree was signed and declared the stone house by the Pasig River as the official summer residence of the Spanish Governor General. Radical change - roof replaced with G.I roofing (lighten loads to walls). It was tile-roofed before. "Malacanang was thus among the first to set the ugly style of corrugated GI roofing." Later on, it was replaced with red tiles again. 1875-1879 - Another renovation, left and right wings were added. An azotea facing the river was joined to the azotea already in existence; a staircase was transferred to the center of the foyer; and galleries were built around the stairway where the public could circulate during crowded receptions.
1880 – Once again bombarded with series of earthquakes. Porticos were added to the facade to shelter waiting carriages. Gobernador-General Residence, formerly the Summer Villa 1901 – Governor General William Howard Taft elevated the palace grounds by 18 inches. Enlarged by a purchase of 17601 m2 of land covering the area east of Malacanang Francis Burton Harrison 1935 – Manuel Luis Quezon as a Commonwealth president, tackled flood problem by reclaiming 15 ft of the Pasig river bank and building a concrete wall. He converted ground floor (bodega) into a social hall construction of chapel at the ground floor. Its location changed a lot during Quezon era. 1935 – Manuel Luis Quezon as a Commonwealth president, tackled flood problem by reclaiming 15 ft of the Pasig river bank and building a concrete wall. He converted ground floor (bodega) into a social hall construction of chapel at the ground floor. Its location changed a lot during Quezon era. 1935 – Manuel Luis Quezon as a Commonwealth president, tackled flood problem by reclaiming 15 ft of the Pasig river bank and building a concrete wall. He converted ground floor (bodega) into a social hall construction of chapel at the ground floor. Its location changed a lot during Quezon era. Malacanang Palace during the Commonwealth Period 1935 – Manuel Luis Quezon as a Commonwealth president, tackled flood problem by reclaiming 15 ft of the Pasig river bank and building a concrete wall. He converted ground floor (bodega) into a social hall construction of chapel at the ground floor. Its location changed a lot during Quezon era. President Magsaysay returned the dropped letter “g” of Malacanang so that there remain is two acceptable spellings for the palace till today. He was also the one who declared the gates of the palace open to the people, a policy which Garcia followed The palace grounds were raised higher some 18 inches.Enlarged by a purchase of 17601 m2 of land covering the area east of Malacanang A new river wall was built inland; a new main gate was opened.
Two new fountains, a 125-foot flagpole, and a modern tennis court were added to the grounds.
A new electric lighting system made the entire palace complex a switchboard.
Parking space was enlarged. The flooring of the palace was replaced with reinforced concrete, or marble tile, or selected hardwood, from the basement (which was raised one level) to the main story. The old coal bodega in the basement was transformed into living quarters, and executive offices, and a new ladies dressing room.

The balcony overlooking the river was rebuilt and given a stairway connecting it with the river. A new wing of reinforced concrete was built to contain a formal dining hall panelled in hardwood. The grand stairway was completed reconstructed. The wooden porte-cochere was replaced with a stone one. STATE ROOMS HISTORICAL ROOMS HISTORICAL BUILDINGS Entrance to Rizal Ceremonial Room War-time President Jose Laurel did not reside in Malacanang, even prohibited the conduct of social functions at the palace Rizal Ceremonial Room Reception Hall Aguinaldo State Dining Room Presidential Study Music Room Heroes Hall President’s Hall Rizal Ceremonial Hall -  This hall was where the death sentence of Dr. Jose Rizal was passed in 1896. It has seen many events and official state functions throughout the different Philippine administrations. First Lady Imelda Romualdez Marcos refurbished Malacañang. 1979 marked the completion of her aesthetically inclined designs for the palace. Aguinaldo State Dining Room -  This site was where the Americans confined President Emilio The Heroes Hall, as it is appropriately named, contains busts of Philippine heroes made by Guillermo Tolentino. Its walls are also lined with murals depicting the history of the Philippines. Used by a number of Presidents as their office, this room held many confidential meetings during the term of Presidents Quezon, Laurel, Osmeña, Roxas, Quirino, Magsaysay, Garcia, and Marcos. Reception Hall -  Featuring the official portraits of Philippine Presidents, the Reception Hall was built during the American Period and underwent many changes over the years until it was eventually restored in 2011. Music Room -  The different first ladies used this room as their reception area up until the Presidency of Corazon C. Aquino, who used it to entertain officials and foreign Ambassadors. President’s Hall – Constructed from 1978-79, this part of the Palace has housed different functions throughout several administrations MAGSAYSAY ROOM GARCIA ROOM LAUREL ROOM MARCOS ROOM MAGSAYSAY ROOM Central airconditioning and disappearance of windows was seen.

Across the river, a guest house was constructed. It is situated on the grounds of Malacañang Golf Club. This guest house was called Bahay Pangarap. Veranda, converted into Maharlika Hall during Marcos Administration Veranda, converted into Maharlika Hall during Marcos Administration Maharlika Hall during Marcos Administration Magsaysay Dining Room -  During the Magsaysay Presidency, from 1953-1957, this room was the center of Cabinet activity Garcia Room- President Carlos P. Garcia spent his recreational time in this room; using it as his game room from 1957-1961. Laurel Room- This room was the bedroom of President Jose P. Laurel when he briefly resided in Malacañan Palace before being evacuated to Baguio towards the end of World War II. Marcos Room- Finished in 1979, these rooms were enlarged in order to serve as the bedroom of the President and Mrs. Marcos toward the end of his presidency. Macapagal Room- Heavily renovated, this room was the former bedroom of the Macapagal couple when they moved into Malacañan Palace on January 16, 1962. Bonifacio Hall

The first major change after the imposition of Martial Law in 1975 was the transformation of the servant’s quarters to what is now known as the Premier Guest House. It became the temporary residence of the Marcos family in 1975. President Corazon C. Aquino used this building as her office from 1986 to 1992. It is the new Executive Building. President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo renamed this building Bonifacio Hall Part of the palace was turned into a museum Kalayaan Hall

The oldest part of the palace. It has precast ornamentation, elaborate wrought iron porte-cochere and balconies, the loggias and high cellings. Bahay Pangarap Bahay Pangarap Mabini Hall

This is where Department of Budget and Management held office in 1936. After World War II, it housed, for a time, the Supreme Court. 1993 – Josephine, daughter of Fidel Ramos, married actor Lloyd Samartino first ecumenical wedding solemnized in Malacanang and also the first wedding in Malacanang which was extensively covered by TV Chapel has remained even when a protestant president (former President Fidel Ramos) was seated Aerial view of Malacanang Palace across Pasig River back Site Development Plan
and
Site Elevation of Malacanang Palace Malacañang "Mala caña" (bad cane) "mamalakaya" "May lakad diyan" "Malacuayan" "ma-lakan-iyan" - "a place where the chief resided" - "there are nobles there - sounds attributed to malevolent spirits by the birds and insects - "bamboo grass" SPANISH TIMES AMERICAN TIMES RECENT TIMES Bahay na bato
Made up of stones and wood

Radical change - roof replaced with G.I roofing (lighten loads to walls). It was tile-roofed before. "Malacanang was thus among the first to set the ugly style of corrugated GI roofing." Later on, it was replaced with red tiles again. - referring to the fishermen
Use of shutters alike of Japanese shoji (made of opalescent shell) to soften intensity of tropic sunlight.

The best of Philippine Hardwoods, including Narra and Molave for floorings and wall panels.

Reinforced concrete as main building material. Renovated few parts to enhance the capabilities of walls and beams for support, load-bearing abilities, and safe and sound-proofing

Corazon Aquino Regime - built a New Executive building made of concrete REFERENCES Photos

http://balita.ph/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/ph10-101510.jpg  
http://entertainment.inquirer.net/files/2012/03/Malacanang-Palace.jpg
http://static2.asiaplacestosee.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/museum.jpghttp://www.gov.ph/images/uploads/101112_JM42-1024x717.jpg
http://malacanang.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/Quezon-Executive-Office-3-682x1024.jpg
http://www.valoriemarie.com/wp-content/gallery/queen-sofia-of-spain/q030712_gn4.jpg
http://www.gov.ph/images/uploads/140911_GN51-1024x514.jpg
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2501/3759812519_b7e902542b.jpg Books

Pasig river of life by Reynaldo Gamboa Alejandro
Palacio de Malacañang : 200 years of a ruling house by Nick Joaquin

Videos

National Geographic Channel’s Inside Malacanang
RTV Malacanang’s Malacanang Documentary 1998


Internet Sources

http://www.aenet.org/manila-expo/page19.
htm
http://interaksyon.com/10-cool-things-you-didn-t-know-about-malacanang Façade Detail Floor Plans
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