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"The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin

Lesson for "The Story of an Hour"
by

Megan Ariel

on 29 April 2014

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Transcript of "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin

"The Story of an Hour" (1894)
by Kate Chopin

Journal Prompt
Have you ever been in a relationship (with a family member, a friend, or a partner) where it seemed as though you couldn’t be yourself? How did that make you feel? Explain.
Historical Context
1890-1925
: A progressive era results. Women from all classes and backgrounds enter public life. Women's roles expand and result in an increasing politicization of women. Consequently, the issue of woman suffrage becomes mainstream politics ("Woman Suffrage Timeline").
When Chopin was writing, the
feminist movement
had barely begun, and in Louisiana, women were still considered to be their husbands’ lawful property (SparkNotes Editors).
Keep in mind, however, that
not all women had the same or similar experiences
. Black women and poor women often had to work in the "public sphere" to make ends meet, while upper class white women were often expected to stay in the "private sphere" and maintain a domestic, pious lifestyle.
Whole Group Discussion
How do social identities influence the meaning of this short story?
How does
gender
influence this text?
How does
race
influence this text?
How does
class
influence this text?
Do our personal social identities as readers influence our response to this text? (For instance, is textual meaning dependent on the gender/race/class of the reader?) If so, how?
Or, in what ways does the text transcend these social identities, conveying similar meaning to all types of people?
How do social identities (gender, race, class, etc.) shape the experiences of people today?
Homework!
Found Poem!
Pick
25-30
meaningful, important
words
from "The Story of an Hour." Then arrange these words together in a way that describes and reflects the text's meaning.
Bring your poem to our next class!
Have fun!
Notable Vocabulary
Afflicted
Exalted
Impose
Persistence
Repression
Tumultuously
What do we know about Mrs. Mallard?
Why are her family members concerned about her reaction to her husband's death?
What does this description about the scene outside Mrs. Mallard's window reveal?
What words does the author use to describe the view?
What is happening to the sky?
How does Mrs. Mallard feel about her husband's death? Why?
What questions does this raise about Mrs. Mallard's heart trouble?”
Is it possible that her affliction”could have been caused by other factors?
What caused Mrs. Mallard's death?
How is the ending surprising?
2nd paragraph...
6th paragraph...
11th paragraph...
Journal Prompt
(after reading):
Is it possible to lose something important and gain by that loss at the same time? Explain.
17th paragraph...
Conclusion...
Works Cited
Chopin, Kate, and Rachel Adams.
The Awakening and Selected Short Fiction
. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2005. Print.

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on The Story of an Hour.” SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. 2007. Web. 1 Oct. 2013.

"Woman Suffrage Timeline (1840-1920)."
National Women's History Museum
. Web. 5 Oct. 2013.
Full transcript