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Invertebrates

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by

Heather Glazebrook

on 15 November 2016

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Transcript of Invertebrates

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A quick overview
Invertebrates
Porifera
Poriferans are commonly referred to as sponges. An early branching event in the history of animals separated the sponges from other organisms. There are approximately 5,000 living sponge species. A key characteristic of sponges is all are aquatic and
asymmetrical
(no symmetry). Because they are asymmetrical, they do not have segmentation.

Sponges are also characterized by being
invertebrates
(no backbone). Additionally they reproduce
asexually
through fragmentation or budding.


Annelids
Annelids are all of the
bilaterally
, segmented,
invertebrate
worms. Being
segmented
means their body is broken into individual sections/parts.

When you're on land, you gotta move. You gotta get to food. You gotta hide from predators. You gotta find other worms to reproduce. Speaking of reproduction, most annelids reproduce
sexually
, but in extreme circumstances, they can reproduce asexually!
Chrodates


All chordates have bilateral symmetry and reproduce sexually. Our segmentation is found in our spines. Each vertebrae is a segment in our body. There are five major groups of vertebrates: fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Cnidarians
Cnidarians are incredibly diverse in shape and form. This evidenced (seen) by looking at the many different types of corals, hydroids, and jelly fish. All cnidarians have
radial symmetry
and are
invertebrates
.

The name Cnidaria comes from the Greek word "cnidos," which means stinging nettle. Casually touching many jelly fish will make it clear how they got their name when their nematocysts eject barbed threads tipped with poison.

Cnidarians reproduce
sexually
and
do not have segmentation
.



Platyhelminthes
The simplest animals that are bilaterally symmetrical are the Platyhelminthes, the flatworms. Flatworms have no body cavity other than the gut and lack an anus. The lack of a body cavity makes flatworms to be flat
invertebrates
with
no segmentation
.

Flatworms are hermaphrodites. This means they contain both male and female parts for
sexual reproduction
. When needed a flatworm can “change sex”. They have
bilaterial symmetry
.



Mollusks

All mollusks have
bilateral
symmetry. This means you can cut a mollusk in half and it will look the same on both side. Mollusks
do not have segmentation
.

All mollusks reproduce
sexually
. Land mollusks, like snails, fertilize their eggs internally. Aquatic mollusks, like octopi, fertilize their eggs externally. Some species of snails are hermaphrodites (both male and female).
Echnioderms
Echinoderms have
radial
symmetry as adults, but are
bilateral
as young! Echinoderms also have 5 segments! They also have
segmentation
.

Echinoderms reproduce
sexually
. There are separate sexes. Fertilization occurs outside the body, in the ocean. The larvae of echinoderms, are bilateral and will swim freely. The larva will settle to the bottom of the ocean for metamorphosis into an adult.

arthropod
They reproduce very quickly using sexual reproduction. They are bilaterally symmetrical and invertebrates

The easiest way to tell an arthropod from any other animal is to see if they have:
1) A segmented body.
2) Many jointed legs or limbs.
3) An exoskeleton.
4) Cold blooded

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