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DID U.S. ISOLATIONISM LEAD TO WWII?

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on 1 May 2015

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Transcript of DID U.S. ISOLATIONISM LEAD TO WWII?

Answer to Close Ended Question A
Global Connections Question A
Open-Ended Question B
Open-Ended Question A
Close-Ended Question B
DID U.S. ISOLATIONISM LEAD TO WWII?
Nick Thompsen - Agree
Viv LaBreche - Disagree
Period 6
Close-Ended Question A
Answer to Close Ended Question A
U.S. ISOLATIONISM
How Did The U.S. Justify Their Isolationism?
Answer to Close Ended Question A
Answers To Close-Ended Question B
Answers To Close-Ended Question B
Answers To Close-Ended Question B
Answer to Close Ended Question A
Answers To Close-Ended Question B
Answers To Open-Ended Question A
Answers To Open-Ended Question A
Answers To Open-Ended Question A
Answers To Open-Ended Question A
Answers To Open-Ended Question B
Answers To Open-Ended Question B
Answers To Open-Ended Question B
Answers To Open-Ended Question B
Answers To Global Connection A
Answers To Global Connection A
Global Connection Question B
Answers To Global Connection Question B
Answers To Global Connection Question B
Societal Comparison Question A
Answers To Societal Comparison Question A
Answers To Societal Comparison Question A
Societal Connection Question B
Answers To Societal Comparison Question B
Answers To Societal Comparison Question B
Did U.S. Isolationism Lead To WWII?
Conclusion Slide Viv
Although US isolation was a factor in starting WWII, it was not the main cause of the war because even though they were isolated other countries grew and became stronger, they were completely ready for the war and ultimately ended the war, and Germany and Japan's growth and dictator rulers would still have caused this much trouble if the United States hadn't been as isolated as they were.
How did US isolationism affect the war effort of other countries and the outcome of the war?
Was the US entrance into the war inevitable?
How do you think US isolationism impacted the pre-WWII era?
How did the global economic crash lead to WWII?
How did the US intern suppress its own ideals with its own isolationism?
How did other foreign powers view US isolationism?
Unique geographic isolation > developed by themselves and industrialized independently

Didn't join League of Nations > subtract from war possibility for US

Neutrality Acts > avoided financial, political, or any war-related deals with other countries fighting the war
The United States refused their power > not cocky, understood limits

Wilson's successor spoke of the US potential without the entanglement of other countries

Immigration laws > reduce refugees, kept the US a smaller but expansive state
Right after WWI the U.S. returned to its isolationist ways
-Rejection of Wilsonian ideals after WWI

Wanted to go back to old traditional policies that encouraged peace, commerce, and honest friendship with with all nations, entangling alliances with none

Economic crisis deflated U.S. confidence which in turn allowed the U.S. to turn in on its self even more

As tensions grew in Europe the U.S. tried to completely seal its self off from the rest of the world

Anti-war campaigns led to an abhorrence of arms

The U.S. felt that they had much less power than they actually did
Conclusion Slide Nick
Although U.S. isolationism was not the only cause of WWII it was one of the main reasons for the start of the war because it allowed authoritarian rule to sweep the world with the weakened League of Nations, contributed to the worsening of the Great Depression, and made diplomatic resolve abroad impossible.
Works Cited
Limited U.S. aid to France and Britain
-Created a shortage of goods such as: Rubber, oil, and munitions

The U.S. also limited immigration to 3%
-Made Hitler find a new way of getting rid of non-aryans

Left the League of Nations powerless to stop would be aggressors
-Neutrality Acts
Allowed fascism and other dictatorships to grow, and develop into threats towards democracy

Allow Germany to directly violate the Treaty of Versailles

Never let some countries completely recover from WWI because the U.S. stopped financing their war debts which made them fall even further behind and hopeless to the rising power of the axis powers
U.S. feared its own security so it became even more isolated
-This allowed the Axis Powers to grow in power

Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928 led to deep isolationist feelings

Neutrality Acts of 1938 did not allow trade between waring countries
*Allies enter the war ---> No U.S. military aid
Helped other countries become more independent

Allowed Stalinist Russia to industrialize by themselves

More time to prepare for possibility of war
Other nations rely on themselves

Tougher conditions > stronger country

Forced to put more effort into the war effort
Axis power was growing, but Allies had more people

More resources to draw from

Isolation was working, they were untangled; unexpected
Other countries were developing by themselves

All countries in total war

Geographic location
Made the League of Nations weak and unable to enforce global law

Deprived Germany of financial aid which led to a deep hatred towards the U.S. and the Allies

Unwillingness to become involved in diplomatic resolutions in Europe
Isolationism helped the U.S. economy get back on track but harmed just about every other countries economy

Isolation set high tarriffs to protect the U.S.'s trade and keep the domestic economy good

We blatantly ignored Europe
*Stimson Doctrine ---> said that the U.S. would not recognize any lands gained by aggression or in disagreement with international policy
Isolation led to lack of trade especially in the agricultural area

Curbed immigration to try to reduce the amount of foreign influence on the country

U.S.'s blunt rejection that war was coming
Depression led to the loss of U.S. confidence

Dramatically increased tariffs ---> decrease in world trade

Increased popular distrust in the banking system and businessmen

Stopped financial aid of European countries
-Johnson Act of 1934
Recovering from the Great Depression > gave countries hope

Subtracted the US, other countries became stronger

Other countries stood up, took power
Raised sense of urgency about war

Allowed other countries to invent and create new things and rise as an industrial power

Nationalistic feelings rose
Countries were vulnerable

Rulers who stepped up caused more unrest

Effects of crash > terror of future, unsureness, and government stability questioned
Independent nation

Using their own industries

Less trading, more nationalism
Axis went along, then Japan had enough

Allies were stranded but carried their own

Germans kept going in Europe, got away with more
Isolation discouraged Wilsonian principles of political collectivity to prevent/punish foreign aggressors

We did not protect Roosevelt's four freedoms:
Freedom of speech, religion, freedom from want, and from fear

Allowed the internment of some Japanese who were suspected traitors before WWII


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Some European countries were angered because they got less and less financial aid

The Fascists saw it as a scapegoat to promote authoritarian rule

The Allies panicked as they no longer were able to preserve peace in Europe

How did U.S. immigration regulations impact foreign powers?
Made Hitler have to come up with another plan to get rid of the non-aryans
-Immigration Law of 1924 reduced immigration to 3%

Limitations on Jewish immigration in U.S. fueled by congressional anti-semitism

Did not allow refugees to flee Stalinist Russia
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Less citizens fleeing, greater population

Kept the US isolated

Made the dictator have more power over more people, led to bigger armies and larger battles
Full transcript