Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Language Curriculum Design

Outline of Language Curriculum Design by Nation & Macalister for the M.Ed. TESOL & M.Ed TESOL(EAP) module 'Evaluating Practice in Context'
by

Nick Moore

on 27 January 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Language Curriculum Design

"Language Curriculum Design"
Nick Moore
Evaluating Practice in Context
GOALS
Situations of use: exam results
Proficiency: vocab test
Content &
Sequencing

Format &
Presentation

Monitoring
& Assessment

Evaluation
Evaluation
Lacks:
What students cannot do
Wants:
What students wish to do
Wishes: self-assessment
Uses: observation / report
Necessities:
What students have to do
Situations of use: text analysis; exams; tasks; corpus
Proficiency: e.g. vocabulary level; reading speed
Needs
Target
Learning
facilitate
Perspectives on Needs
Vocabulary: Sequencing by core to specialised
Narrow (training) vs. wide (education) focus: prepared only for situation or respond to variety of context?
Critical: NA supports 'status quo' & power structures
Inclusion: gain all stakeholders' perspectives
Resistant: identify current to resist and oppose powerful
Age
Level in L1 & L2
Purpose
Learning styles, habits & strategies
Training
English level & confidence
Time for preparation, marking, CPD
Classroom set-up
Time available
Resources available
Learners:
Teachers:
Situation:
Steps in an Environment Analysis
1. Brainstorm, identify, verify & systematically consider ALL aspects of the environment
2. Choose up to 5 of the most significant factors & rank them
3. Identify information necessary to account for each factor from research &/or theory
4. Consider how each factor affects course design
Content & Sequencing
1. Frequency
2. Strategies & autonomy
3. Spaced retrieval
4. Language system
5. Progress
6. Teachability
7. Learning burden
8. Interference
Format & Presentation
1. Motivation
2. Four Strands
3. Comprehensible Input
4. Fluency
5. Output
6. Deliberate Learning
7. Time on Task
8. Depth of Processing
9. Integrative Motivation
10. Learning Style
Monitoring & Assessment
Ongoing needs & environment analysis - regular, planned adjustments to course
Feedback to learners - improving quality of language and learning
Processing
Superficial
Deep
Type of Processing
Typical Teaching Techniques
Formal
Repetition
drill
Mnemonic Devices
keyword /
acronym
Reproduction Using Long-term Memory
dicto-comp
Natural Language Processing at I+1
graded reader
Deduction to Examples
relating to experience
Inductive Analysis
Prediction
guessing reading content from titles & graphics
20 questions
Content &
Sequencing
Format &
Presentation
Monitoring
& Assessment
GOALS
SET TARGETS & PLAN PROGRESSION OF ACTIVITIES TOWARDS TARGETS
ENABLE EVALUATION OF ADEQUACY, SUITABLITY & ORDERING OF COURSE
MONITOR & REPORT ON LEARNER PROGRESS TOWARDS GOALS
linear
spiral
matrix
modular
Sequencing Options
linear & revision
field
Vocabulary
Grammar
Function
Discourse
Skills, Sub-skills & Strategies
Ideas / Topics / Themes
Tasks
Sequence by
Progress in
Order by
Notes
words, phrases
frequency; appearance
structure
frequency; acquisition
contexts
utility
text types
genre
sub-skills; strategies
four skills; linguistic complexity
complexity
area of interest
words; phrases; grammar
frequency; utility; complexity
core; academic; sub-technical; specialised
underlying sequence
notional-functional
corpus analysis
learner training
ESP; content-driven; CLIL
Willis & Willis Collins Cobuild English Course
Content Options
Four Strands
Meaning-Focused Input
Meaning-Focused Output
Fluency Development
Language-Focused
Learning
Activities
Experience
Shared
Guided
Independent
previous experience allows fluency & confidence
students can only reach goal together
students finish partly- completed task
student no longer needs repetition, assistance or guidance
Listening: Listen to a story for pleasure;
Speaking: Practice & submit best recording;
Reading: Speed reading course;
Writing: Project work
Listening: Ranking;
Speaking: Brainstorming;
Reading: Paired / jigsaw reading;
Writing: Group composition
Listening: Taking notes;
Speaking: Be interviewed;
Reading: Read a newspaper;
Writing: Complete an assignment
Listening: Listen & order pictures;
Speaking: Answering survey questions;
Reading: True/False/Not Given questions;
Writing: Picture compositions
What is the purpose of the assessment or monitoring?
Placement
Proficiency
Achievement
Observation
Progress
Diagnostic
Match environmental constraints
Match level of student to course
Structural / lexical / course objectives
Assess effects of activity Check goals; conditions needed; how goals are demonstrated; necessary changes
Periodic, in relation to limited goal / set of goals
Performance against objectives
Performance assessment
Gaps & weaknesses related to goals
Lacks analysis
Goal setting (remedial)
Independent of a course
Criterion referenced
Often high stakes, "profound" washback effect
IELTS / TOEFL / GESE
During/after course/set of objectives
Measure what is learned against what is taught
Norm-/criterion-referenced
"Significant" washback effect
What makes a good assessment?
Reliable
Not influenced by conditions
Same ability = same score
Standard conditions, consistent grading, range of assessment tools, & clear instructions
Practical
Cost-effective
Efficient to sit & to administer
Results are easy to understand by all consumers
"True" measure
"Does what it says on the tin"
Face validity: tests 'correctly'
Content validity: matches teaching
Construct validity: suitable outside effects & real world consequences
Valid
1. What is it?
2. How do you do it?
3. How can we categorise it?

What is Evaluation?
Is this the best course possible?
Does the course produce the best results?
Does the course have the best planning?
Is the course run in the best way?
What are the standards of teaching?
Are students meeting the goals & targets of the course?
How satisfied are the learners with different aspects of the course?
Is the course cost-effective?
What steps do you need to take to carry out an evaluation?
1. Target
Who is it for? Why? What information is needed?
2. Use of Results
3. What information is available?
What do you know already? Do you really need an evaluation?
4. What resources do you have?
5. What information do you need?
How are you going to find it?
6. Get
support
7. Plan
who gathers data & how
8. Present
Findings
9. Review scope of evaluation
Focus
Tools
• Progress, Achievement & Proficiency tests
• Learner self-report scales
• Analysis of course book content
• Learner interviews
Amount of learning
• Progress, Achievement & Proficiency assessment
• Lesson observation
• Learner interviews
• Teacher diaries
• Research reports
Quality of learning
Quality of teaching
• Systematic lesson observation
• Teacher interviews
• Learner / Teacher self-report scales
• Achievement tests
• Audit of staff experience & qualifications
Quality of course book
• Progress, Achievement & Proficiency assessment
• Course book evaluation
• Unit / lesson / material evaluation
• Teacher & learner questionnaires / interviews
Quality of curriculum
• Course evaluation
• Analysis of syllabus (needs, environment, principles, goals...)
• Course materials evaluation
Success of course
'graduates'
• Employer & Graduate questionnaires / interviews
• Comparison with other proficiency measures e.g. GPA
Teacher / learner /
sponsor satisfaction
• Self-report scales
• Questionnaires / Interviews
• Re-enrolment, contract renewal, staff retention etc.
Table 8.2 Focus and tools for evaluation of teaching and learning (Nation & Macalister, 2010, p.129)
Which type of Evaluation?
purpose
data type
use of data
presentation of findings
Formative
Summative
improve course
judge course
causes
processes
individuals
standards
groups
results
counselling
professional development
goal setting
materials adaptation
adequacy of course
presentation
discussion(s)
(written) report
Where Next?
One small change in a course can affect:
the course book
the approach to teaching
teaching techniques
tests & test questions
use of L1 & L2 in learning
use of technology
change to norm- or criterion-referenced testing
administrative procedures
& others
Change is not the same as success
Evaluation is likely to lead to change
Questions to ask before proposing a change:
Is change necessary?
How big is the change?
How realistic is the change?
Who is involved?
How will it affect teachers' beliefs & practices?
What change strategy will be most effective?
How can the change be managed?
& others
HUTCHINSON, Tom & WATERS, Alan (1987).
English for Specific Purposes: A Learning-centred Approach
. Cambridge: C.U.P., p.22
Identifying Needs, Wants & Lacks
Present
Required
objective
subjective
Lacks
Necessities
Wants
self-assessment
questionnaire
interview
observation
objective data collection
Full transcript