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The Giving Tree Protocol

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Jessica Clay

on 22 November 2013

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Transcript of The Giving Tree Protocol

Find your opponent

The person who believes "the tree is weak" will present their argument first. 2 minutes
The person who believes "the tree is strong" will present their argument second. 2 minutes
*The person listening MUST stay quiet and stick with their predetermined argument

1 minute on your own
note which of your opponents arguments was most convincing
The Giving Tree Protocol
Draw a Chart to Organize Your Thoughts
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
Now Let's Line Up
If you chose "the tree was weak" line up on one side of the room.

If you chose "the tree was strong" line up on the other side of the room.

*if lines are uneven - consider changing sides if you feel like you are on the fence (you can argue either side)

Now, find the person who is directly across from you on the other side.
*Give them your best "I'm gonna take you down" face.
*This person will be your future opponent
Return to your caucus for 5 minutes
review your opponents' best arguments
together - develop a counter-argument
find evidence in the text to support your argument
Students will understand the process of examining both sides of an issue in order to build and present an argument. Students will understand the difference between persuasive and expository.
Academic Language
Expository or Informational texts explain both sides of an issue.
Persuasive texts advocate (support) one side of an issue.
Good Morning!

Please take out 2 sheets of paper & something to write with
Turn off all computers, and cell phones
Be prepared to listen and participate
The Tree is Weak The Tree is Strong
Now, put a star next to the column with the most evidence, or next to the column you feel most strongly about
Now, we will caucus with like-minded folks for 5 minutes.
stay on your side
discuss the arguments you wrote down
put the arguments in order from weakest to strongest
determine the 3 best, strongest arguments
Caucus -
a group with shared concerns
Face Off
"Tree is weak" side presents their rebuttal
"Tree is strong" side presents their rebuttal
2 minutes each
keep talking the entire time
stay with just one argument (elaborate, explain, give examples)
*Now - together, decide who won the debate
discuss which reasons were most convincing and why
3 minutes
Back to our desks...
Let's reflect on our experience.

Write one or two sentences that blend the strongest reason from each side of the debate
Include a transition "but, however, yet, or except" in your sentence
Transitions connect ideas to make complex thoughts
For Example:
The tree was weak when _____________________, however ______________________________.
The tree was strong because it ______________, except that _________________.
The tree was both weak and strong. For example, ______________________________.
Now, write for 5 minutes on this new idea.
Explain and give evidence for the idea.
Write again, this time write a statement that expresses ONLY the strongest reason given by the winning side
Write for 5 minutes, explain and give evidence for this idea
Full transcript