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History of and Introduction to Batik

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by

Andrea Wojnowski

on 21 May 2013

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Transcript of History of and Introduction to Batik

A Brief History of Batik Mysterious Origins Batik or “wax writing” as the Javanese translate it,
has become a medium and form of expression
for many people of many different places. Batik is a “craft” that predates written records,
so the true place of origin is unknown.


Some theories about places of origin include:
Egypt, Indonesia, or India. 4th century BCE:
EGYPT
Archaeological findings have found that batik was used for linen wraps around mummies.

Linen was soaked in wax and scratched with a sharp tool. White patterns on a blue background were found. 6th century:
China

Batik was used for folding screens with floral and bird motifs
Batik became an important part of Indonesian culture and economy.

It is believed that the tjanting tool was invented in the 12th century in Java, Indonesia because of the intricate batik patterns emerging from the area.






In the 12th century typical batik forms included textiles, costumes (for ceremonies), and decorative art- like wall hangings. 12th century:
Indonesia The Dutch colonized Java therefore batik was introduced to Holland, Europe, and some parts of Africa.

The Dutch used wax resist on leather, paper, ivory and metal
(art nouveau) 17th century:
Holland Countries in Europe, like England, tried to produce batik imitations to sell.

Instead of using a tjanting for detailed work these countries developed and used a block or stamp of a pattern.

This allowed them to dip the stamp in wax and press it into the fabric to produce mass quantities quickly 19th century:
Commercial Imitation -Developed batik factories 20th century:
Germany -Tjantings made of glass and metal with flow of wax controlled by a button Contemporary batik emerged – etching, stencils, different tools for waxing and dyeing (I.e. leather, wood, ceramics). Batik as a contemporary painting or used in sculpture. 21st century Batik as high fashion: gowns, dresses, pants, shirts, scarfs, etc. Images:
http://www.batikguild.org.uk/history.asp
http://crafts.helium.com/zone/2568-batik-an-ancient-art
http://www.designsponge.com/2010/07/past-present-batik-batik-ribbon-project.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batik#History
http://www.expat.or.id/info/batik.html

Content:

Keller, I. (1966). History of batik. Batik: the art and craft (pp. 13-15). Toyko: Charles E. Tuttle Company.

Robinson, S. (1969). Resist processes. A history of dyed textiles (pp. 39-43). London: Studio Vista. References Your Assignment: Create a contemporary painting using the batik method. 1. Your design must include one principle and two elements of art (chosen randomly) in sophisticated ways

2. Your design can be representational or non representational, but must be an original image. You will be graded on your originality and creativity.

3. You must create three different thumbnail designs, (including color) before you may begin your batik. Elements:
Color
Value
Line
Shape
Principles:
Emphasis
Proportion Elements:
Line
Texture
Form
Shape
Value
Principles:
Balance
Unity
Harmony Elements:
Line
Color
Shape
Principles:
Rhythm
Variety Elements:
Color
Value
Shape
Texture
Principles:
Harmony
Unity
Balance Elements:
Line
Value
Color
Shape
Space
Texture
Form
Principles:
Emphasis
Unity
Harmony
Rhythm
Proportion
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