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30 Days to Understanding the Bible

geography of the Old Testament
by

Brian Walter

on 23 February 2014

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Transcript of 30 Days to Understanding the Bible

Daniel gives _________ and encourages ___________ among the ______ for the next seventy years.
Joshua leads the of the
Samson and others were chosen as to the people for rebellious years.
or how does the Bible fit together?
30 Days
To Understanding The Bible

Church
Jesus
Hebrew
God
apostles
The Old Testament is the story of ____ and the ________ People, their poets, and Prophets.
The New Testament is the story of ______, the _______ He founded, and the growth under the leadership of His __________ after His death & ressurection
Silence
Return
Exile
Kingdom
Judges
Conquest
Exodus
Patriarch
Creation
Hebrews
James
1 & 2 Peter
1, 2, & 3 John
Jude
Revelation

Matthew
Mark
Luke
John
Acts
(to churches)
Romans
1 & 2 Corinthians
Galatians
Ephesians
Philippians
Colossians
1 & 2 Thessalonians

(to people)
1 & 2 Timothy
Titus
Philemon
27 Books in the NT
28 different authors,
mostly in Hebrew

Isaiah
Jeremiah
Lamentations
Ezekiel
Daniel
Hosea
Joel
Amos
Obadiah
Jonah
Micah
Nahum
Habakkuk
Zephaniah
Haggai
Zechariah
Malachi
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Song of Solomon
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Joshua
Judges
Ruth
1 & 2 Samuel
1 & 2 Kings
1 & 2 Chronicles
Ezra
Nehemiah
Esther
39 Books in all
9 Different Authors,
mostly in Greek
Persia
Babylonia
Assyria
Jerusalem
Egypt
Canaan, Israel, Palestine
Eden
Persian Gulf
Euphrates River
Tigris River
Nile River
Dead Sea
Jordan River
Sea of Galilee
Mediterranean Sea
faithfulness
leadership
exiles
monarchy
exile
leads
judges
unrighteous
Jerusalem
Pharisees and others the Israelites
in for the next years.
legalism
4 hundred
entomb
Kingdom
David
Israel
David, the greatest king in the new _________, is followed by a succession of mostly __________ kings, and God eventually _______ Israel for her sin, sending her into exile.
Exile
Daniel
Babylonia
Return
Ezra
Jerusalem
Ezra _____ the people back from _____ to rebuild __________.
Silence
Pharisees
Jerusalem
Era
Figure
Location
Story Line Summary
Story of the Old Testament
Through Moses God the Hebrew people from in Egypt and then gives them the
plan
destroys
sins
represent
people
chosen
Law
slavery
delivers
Land
Promised
conquest
govern
judges
4 hundred
Creation
Adam
Eden
Adam is created by God, but he and
God’s original for man.
Patriarch
Abraham
Canaan
Abraham is by God to “father” a to God to the world.
Exodus
Moses
Egypt
Conquest
Joshua
Canaan
Judges
Samson
Canaan
Era
Figure
Location
Story Line Summary
Story of the Old Testament
The Old Testament
The Bible
The New Testament
5 Historical
13 Pauline Epistles
9 general Epistles
17 Historical
5 Poetical
17 Prophetic
66 Books in all
?
THE END
Creation
Patriarch
Exodus
Conquest
Judges
Kingdom
Exile
Return
Silence
Gospels
Church
Missions
destroys
plan
sins
Era
Figure
Location
Story-Line Summary
Creation
Adam
Eden
Creation Era
Creation Era
Creation (Genesis 1-2)
man in the image of God
Fall (3)
sin enters the world
Flood (6-10)
judgment for sin
Tower of Babel (11)
beginning of the nations
represent
people
chosen
Era
Figure
Location
Story-Line Summary
Patriarch
Abraham
Canaan
The Patriarch Era
The Patriarch Era
Abraham
father of the Hebrew people (Gen. 12-23)
Isaac
second father of the promise (24-26)
Jacob
father of the nation Israel (27-35)
Joseph
leader in Egypt (37-50)
The Patriarch Era
Abraham
father of the Hebrew people (Gen. 12-23)
Isaac
second father of the promise (24-26)
Jacob
father of the nation Israel (27-35)
Joseph
leader in Egypt (37-50)
Law
slavery
delivered
Era
Figure
Location
Story-Line Summary
Exodus
Moses
Egypt
The Exodus Era
Deliverance
freedom from slavery in Egypt (Exodus 1-18)
The Law
God’s commandments at Mt. Sinai (19-40)
Kadesh Barnea
place of rebellion against God (10-14)
Forty Years of Wandering
consequences of rebelling against God (20-36)
The Exodus Era
land
conquest
promised
Era
Figure
Location
Story-Line Summary
Conquest
Joshua
Canaan
The Conquest Era
Jordan
a miraculous parting of water (Joshua 1-5)
Jericho
a miraculous conquest of a city (6)
Conquest
the defeat of Canaan (7-12)
Dominion
finalizing dominion (13-20)
The Conquest Era
A
R
C
O
F
B
I
B
L
E
H
I
S
T
O
R
Y
Preview of the Study

Session 1:


Session 2:

Session 3:

Session 4:

Session 5:

Session 6:

Session 7:

Session 8:

Session 9:

Session 10:

Session 11:

Session 12:

Session 13:
Structure of the Bible, OT
Geography, & Historical Books

The OT Story, Creation-Conquest

The OT Story, Judges-Silence

Poetical and Prophetical Books

NT Geography & Structure

Gospel-Church Eras

Missions Era & Epistles

Foundations of Christian Belief

God & His Son

The Holy Spirit & Angels

Man & Sin

Salvation and the Church

The Doctrine of Future Things
Job
suffering and God’s sovereignty

Psalms
praise in public worship

Proverbs
wisdom, skill for living

Ecclesiastes
futility of temporal pursuits

Song of Solomon
God’s marriage manual

The Poetical Books

Prophecy
warning of impending captivity (Jeremiah)

Prophets
encouraging faithfulness of exiles (Ezekiel & Daniel)

Exiles
assimilated into the culture (Daniel)

Power Change
Persian empire expands (Daniel)
The Exile Era

United Kingdom
a new monarchy (1 & 2 Samuel)

Divided Kingdom
a civil war (1 Kings)

Northern Kingdom
the unrighteous kingdom (2 Kings)

Southern Kingdom
the inconsistent kingdom (2 Kings)

The Kingdom Era

Designation
major and minor prophets

Time Period
pre-exile, exile, or post-exile

Foretelling
predicting the future

Forthtelling
proclaiming the teachings of God

The Prophetical Books

The Changing Guard
the march of nations

Political Sects
the Maccabeans and Zealots

Religious Sects
Pharisees and Sadducees

Messianic Hope
expectation of a savior

The Silence Era

Disrepair
destruction from war and neglect (Nehemiah 1:1-3)

Temple
rebuilding the temple (Ezra 1-6)

People
spiritual rebuilding (Ezra 7-10)

Walls
restoration complete (Nehemiah)

The Return Era

Judges
the leaders of Israel (Judges)

Rebellion
the breaking of God’s law (Judges)

Cycles
repetition to Israel’s misfortunes (Judges)

Ruth
a model woman (Ruth)

The Judges Era

techniques

types

The Poetical Books

present

future

proclaiming

The Prophetical Books

Parallelism
Figures of Speech

ideas

matching

The Poetical Books

creating visual images

Parallelism
Figures of Speech

The Poetical Books

four hundred

legalism

entomb

Era

Figure

Location

Story-Line Summary

Silence

Pharisees

Jerusalem

The Silence Era

four hundred

govern

judges

Era

Figure

Location

Story-Line Summary

Judges

Samson

Canaan

The Judges Era

Jerusalem

exile

leads

Era

Figure

Location

Story-Line Summary

Return

Ezra

Jerusalem

The Return Era

judges

unrighteous

monarchy

Era

Figure

Location

Story-Line Summary

Kingdom

David

Israel

The Kingdom Era

exiles

faithfulness

leadership

Era

Figure

Location

Story-Line Summary

Exile

Daniel

Babylonia

The Exile Era

Era
Summary
Kingdom
David the greatest king in the new , is followed by a succession of mostly kings, and God eventually her sin, sending her into exile
Era
Summary
Exile
Daniel gives and encourages among the for the next seventy years
Summary:
The Poetical books fall into three major of poetry within which the poets used a number of different literary to communicate God's message.
Three major types of Hebrew poetry:
1.
Lyric poetry
- to be accompanied by music, like a song.
2.
Instructional poetry
- to teach principles of living through pithy maxims.
3.
Dramatic poetry
- a narrative that tells a story in poetic form.
Two main literary techniques
Parallelism: the matching of ideas
Rather than matching sounds, a Hebrew poet was more concerned with , a technique called parallelism.
Types of Parallelism:
synonymous, synthetic, antithetic, emblematic, climactic, and formal
Synonymous parallelism:
the ideas presented are similar

Make me know Thy ways, O Lord;
Teach me Thy paths. (Psalm 25:4)
Synthetic parallelism:
the second thought completes the first thought

The Lord is my shepherd,
I shall not want. (Psalm 23:1)
Antithetic parallelism:
the second thought contrasts with the first.
For the Lord knows the way of the righteous,
But the way of the wicked shall perish. (Psalm 1:6)
Emblematic parallelism:
the first line uses a figure of speech to illustrate the idea stated in the second line.
Climactic parallelism:
the second line repeats the first with the exception of the last word or words.
Formal parallelism:
Both lines of poetry must exist for a complete thought.
As the deer pants for the water brooks,
So my soul pants for Thee, O God. (Psalm 42:1)
It is not for kings, O Lemuel,
It is not for kings to drink wine.
(Proverbs 31:4)
But as for me, I have installed my King
Upon Zion, my holy mountain (Psalm 2:6)
Review
In synonymous parallelism, the ideas are ____________.
a. ridiculous
b. similar
c. spelled the same
Review
In synthetic parallelism . . .
a. the second thought is made of nylon
b. the second thought completes the first
c. the second thought doesn't exist
Review
In antithetic parallelism . . .
a. the second thought is written backwards
b. the second thought contrasts with the first
c. the first thought has no counterpoint in the universe
Review
In emblematic parallelism . . .
a. a small metallic emblem is affixed to the first line
b. a figure of speech in the first line illustrates the idea in the second line
c. the ideas are drawn in primitive art form
Review
In climactic parallelism . . .
a. the second thought is very cold
b. the second line repeats the first with the exception of the last word or words
c. the thought is completed in the third act
Review
In formal parallelism . . .
a. the first line appears in a black tie
b. both lines of poetry must exist for a complete thought
c. the second line doesn't slurp its soup
Two main literary techniques:
Figures of speech: creating visual images
Since the Hebrew poets wanted mental pictures to pop into the readers mind, a prime consideration was , which they accomplished with vivid "figures of speech".
five of the most common figures of speech are:
simile, metaphor, hyperbole, rhetorical question, & personification
Simile:
a comparison between two unlike things

Keep me as the apple of the eye (Psalm 17:8)
Metaphor:
a comparison in which one thing is said to be another

The LORD is my shepherd. (Psalm 23:1)
Hyperbole:
deliberate overstatement for the sake of emphasis

Every night I make my bed swim,
I dissolve my couch with my tears. (Psalm 6:6)
Rhetorical question:
asking a question for the purpose of making a statement

Who can speak of the mighty deeds of the LORD, Or who can show forth all His praise?
(Psalm 106:2)
Personification:
assigning the characteristics of a human to lifeless objects

The sun knows the place of its setting. (Psalm 104:2)
summary:
Prophecy is the Word of God, both for the and in the .
prophecies

reject
salvation
Era

Figure

Location

Story-Line Summary

Gospel

Jesus

Palestine

The Gospel Era

Jesus comes in fulfillment of the Old Testament of a savior and offers and the true kingdom of God. While some accept Him, most Him, and He is crucified, buried, and resurrected.
Early Life
childhood to baptism

Early Ministry
initial acceptance

Later Ministry
growing rejection

Death & Resurrection
final rejection

The Gospel Era

church
ascension
establish
Era

Figure

Location

Story-Line Summary

Church

Peter
Jerusalem
The Church Era

Peter, shortly after the of Jesus, is used by God to the , God's next major plan for man.
Creation
birth of the Church (Acts 1-5)

Growth
organization of the Church (Acts 6)

Persecution
the first Christian martyr (Acts 7)

Transition
a missionary to the Gentiles (Acts 8-12)

The Church Era

decades
expands
Roman
Era

Figure

Location

Story-Line Summary

Missions
Paul
Roman Empire
The Missions Era

Paul the Church into the Empire during the next two .
First Missionary Journey
Galatia for two years (Acts 13-14)

Second Missionary Journey
Greece for three years (15-17)

Third Missionary Journey
Asia for four years (18-21)

Trials and Imprisonment
Roman prison for two years (22-28)

The Missions Era

The Nature of Epistles
doctrine, then duty

Pauline epistles to churches
letters to local churches

Pauline epistles to individuals
letters to individuals & pastors

Gerneral epistles
letters to the Christian public

The Epistles

encourage
instruct
The Epistles

Cursus Publicus - "the public way" Roman mail system
first page of
Hebrews
200 A.D.
The epistles are letters to churches and to individuals to them and them in the Christian faith.
Pauline epistles to churches
Romans
: heavily doctrinal, with the most complete doctrine of by grace through faith in all the Bible
1 & 2 Corinthians
: heavily practical, dealing with a series of specific in the Corinthian church
Galatians
: written to some of Paul's first converts, refuting
Ephesians
: deals with the believer’s in Christ and its practical implications
Philippians
: a warm letter of despite trials
Colossians
: the of Christ is its major theme
1 & 2 Thessalonians
: very personal letters dealing with specific issues in the Thessalonian church, including and living
salvation
problems
legalism
position
joy
prophecy
practical
Pauline epistles to individuals
1 & 2 Timothy: two letters to a young pastor in Ephesus. The first letter him on local church issues, and the second him to remain strong in the faith in the midst of trials
Titus: written to the pastor of the church on the island of Crete, it deals largely with local church issues, including the for church leaders
Philemon: written to a slave owner, it urges lenient treatment of a runaway who has become a Christian and is returning to his Christian master
instructs
encourages
qualifications
slave
General Epistles
Hebrews: heavily , this book draws largely on OT truth in teaching NT truth to a Jewish audience
James: an incisive and practical treatment of the proper outworking of Christian in everyday life
1 & 2 Peter: written to believers scattered throughout Asia and Galatia, it deals with the proper response to and opposition
1, 2 & 3 John: letters from the apostle John dealing with the of God
Jude: a brief but powerful book against ungodly living
Revelation: a giant of a book, heavily prophetical, dealing with the nature and chronology of the
doctrinal
faith
suffering
love
warning
end times
preeminence
Full transcript