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Does mint actually cool things down?

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by

Brody Hagen

on 26 May 2015

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Transcript of Does mint actually cool things down?

Does mint actually cool things down?
By Brody Hagen

This feeling is just a thermal illusion. This is also how peppers taste hot.
Does mint affect temperature?
No, it does not affect temperature. The nerves in your mouth make it feel like it does.
Is there a certain kind of mint that is stronger than others?
These mints are called Dragon Souls. Even though they are weak in caffeine, just one of these mints is as strong as an altoid the size of a birthday cake.
What is mint?

Mint is an herb which is only grown in North America, Asia, Australia, Europe, and Africa.
What makes mint have a cool feeling in your mouth?
What is temperature?
Temperature is the measurement of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in a sample of matter, expressed in terms of units or degrees designated on a standard scale.
Are there different kinds of mint?
Catnip- Cats love this herb and it is also great for cat toys.

Spearmint- One of the most intensely fresh mints.

Chocolate Mint- This mint grows in the desert.

If you eat something spicy can mint cool your mouth?
No, but I found out if you suck on sugar for 20 seconds it will help.
What is Fahrenheit?
The Fahrenheit scale is based on 32 for the freezing point of water and 212 for the boiling point of water.
What is Celsius?

The Celsius scale is based on 0 as the freezing point of water and 100 as the boiling point of water.
What is Kelvin?
Kelvin in the base unit of thermodynamic temperature measurement in the International System of measurement.
Hypothesis
My hypothesis was that mint could cool down the actual room temperature. I experimented over a period of 25 minutes. I thought that since it cools down my mouth when I eat mints that it would actually affect the temperature of my mouth. When I drink water after eating a mint it tastes like it is almost sub zero. When I did my project I used Ice Breakers mints. My control temperature was at 120 degrees Fahrenheit.
Materials
Some of the materials I used were:
• Thermometer
• Ice Breakers mints
• 2 glasses of hot water

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Procedure
1. Get one glass of hot water and take the temperature with a thermometer. Record this.
2. Place five mints in the glass of hot water and take the temperature again. Was there a change?
3. Place more mints in the glass of hot water five at a time and record whether you see any change at all. You should monitor the temperature for 30 minutes.
4. The other glass of hot water is to be used as a reference. This is because we know that water cools over time and we want to make sure that if there is any change in temperature, it is not independent of time, but of the mints speeding up the cooling process.
5. Record your results. Any changes?

Data
Conclusion
My conclusion is that mint does not affect temperature. For my experiment I filled up one glass of water with exactly one cup of water that at 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Then I added five mints and set a timer for five minutes. Every five minutes I checked the temperature and reset the timer for a period of 25 minutes. I repeated this procedure with a glass of 120 degree Fahrenheit water with no mints. The temperature of the water containing the mints cooled at the same rate as the water without the mints.
Bibliography
http://www.wikihow.com/Cool-Your-Tongue-After-Eating-Spicy-Food
http://www.education.com/science-fair/article/does-mint-cool-things-down/
http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/m/mints-39.html
http://chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/558/why-does-menthol-e-g-peppermint-feel-cool-to-the-tongue
http://www.examiner.com/article/the-strongest-mints-ever-made-dragon-soul-delivers-a-big-punch
http://www.personal.psu.edu/afr3/blogs/siowfa12/2012/10/why-does-mint-make-your-mouth-cold.html

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