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Photography

Yearbook Photography Powerpoint
by

William Wilson

on 19 August 2015

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Transcript of Photography

U
P
E
C
E
C
Y
Photography is what makes the book interesting!
P
PHOTOGRAPHY
Without it our spreads would look like this.
L
Lets get to know your camera
One of the most important parts of photography is knowing your camera.
The DSLR
Without it our spreads would look like this.
Composition
Photos should Feature a wide range of angles, techniques and subject matter.
The DSLR
1
2
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Hot Shoe
This allows an external flash to be mounted directly to your camera.
Built-in-flash
This pops up when a flash is needed for the exposure, unless you manually set it to not use flash. This is useful in low light situations, but it doesn't always make the most faltering pictures.
Focus Ring
Is used to bring the desired element in the viewfinder into focus
Zoom Ring
This is used to zoom into you subject, some lenses zoom father than others and some don't zoom at all.
Lens
The lens is the eyes of your camera, it sees light and then records it to your sensor.
Battery Door
This is where the battery goes, never go out without charging it.
Aperture Dial
This controls your aperture, I will get into that later
Shutter release button
Press this half way to auto focus, and all the way to take your a picture
Control Panel
This displays shows how many exposures are available, shutter speed, battery, image quality and modes
Without it our spreads would look like this.
Exposure
Three functions of your camera work together to produce the correct exposure:
ISO
Aperture
Shutter speed
The DSLR
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Hot Shoe
This allows an external flash to be mounted directly to your camera.
Built-in-flash
This pops up when a flash is needed for the exposure, unless you manually set it to not use flash. This is useful in low light situations, but it doesn't always make the most faltering pictures.
Focus Ring
Is used to bring the desired element in the viewfinder into focus
Zoom Ring
This is used to zoom into you subject, some lenses zoom father than others and some don't zoom at all.
Lens
The lens is the eyes of your camera, it sees light and then records it to your sensor.
Battery Door
This is where the battery goes, never go out without charging it.
Aperture Dial
This controls your aperture, I will get into that later
Shutter release button
Press this half way to auto focus, and all the way to take your a picture
Control Panel
This displays shows how many exposures are available, shutter speed, battery, image quality and modes
Here are ten things to photograph for every photo assignment.
Coverage
Without it our spreads would look like this.
Here are some photographs with interesting angles and compositions.
Without it our spreads would look like this.
In yearbook we don't want to over Photoshop pictures!
Without it our spreads would look like this.
Learning how to put your photos on Server.
Without it our spreads would look like this.
YEARBOOK
PHOTOGRAPHY
Examples
Photoshop
Uploading your
photos
Balance
Simplicity
Pattern and
repetition
Choose an angle
Rule of Thirds
Leading Lines
Rule of Thirds
cont.
Depth of field
Peak of emotion
Influence of different lights
on a photograph.
Flash
Center of interest
Framing
Control where the eye goes first by having one dominant element in each photo.
When you “frame” a photo, you place objects in the foreground to give the illusion of three dimensions.
Place the main subject(s) slightly off center. Informal balance is most pleasing to the eye.
Try using a simple background to make your shots look cleaner.
While patterns draw the reader into the picture, it’s the break in the repetition that proves interesting.
Move around. Take shots from above, from below, from one side and then the another.
Use this basic guideline for a well-balanced, pleasing image. First, divide the frame into thirds both horizontally and vertically. Then, place the subject at the intersection of any two lines.
Using this guideline of placing the center of interest in one of the intersections, you can allow the action to flow into the photo.
Lines and curves direct the viewer’s attention to the center of visual interest.
Depth of field helps isolate the subject of the photo.
Look for action and reaction, try to capture the height of the moment.
ISO
ISO is the number that indicates the camera’s sensitivity to light. The higher the number, the less light you need, BUT the noisier (grainier) the photograph looks.

Normally, use between 200-800 ISO, with 200 for daylight and 800 for dimmer light.
Low ISO
High ISO
Aperture
Aperture is how wide the lens is open. Every time you take a photo, the lens of your camera opens to let in light.
The low aperture makes this photo clear and sharp.
The high ISO makes this photo grainy and fuzzy.
High Aperture
Low Aperture
The low aperture isolated the subject.
The higher aperture made everything in this photo in focus
Shutter
Shutter speed is how long the shutter stays open.
To capture still photos of fast motion, you have to use a fast shutter speed (at least 1/500 of a second).
If the subject is not moving, you can use a slower shutter speed (down to 1/60 of a second).
High shutter speed
Low shutter speed
Notice the blur created by the extremely slow (approx. 1/2 second)
Speed
You can see the drops of water in the photo on the right because of the much faster (approx. 1/1000 second) shutter speed.
1. Scene-Setter
2. The Stars
3. Peak Action
4. Honest Emotion
5. Tight Portraits
6. Interaction
7. Behind The Scenes
8. In The Moment
9. Playing with
Shapes
10. Artifacts
The image describes the overall environment.
Stars are people comfortable in the spotlight. People that people know.
It's about the moment: collisions, jumping and screaming. Anticipate when something will happen.
Look for body language and narrow in on people's faces. Get really close.
Move in close and hold the subject in the frame. Work with a wide open aperture to give the photo back ground blur.
You want the photo to tell a story about what just happened or what is about to happen. Tell the story of friends about to graduate or the new kid who just set foot on campus.
Here you focus on students who may not otherwise be in the yearbook. Gain access and go behind the scenes.
These might take place behind the scenes, but they also occur between key moments.
Treat people in the photos like objects and look for the forms and lines of their bodies and things around them.
Showing the personality without showing the person. It could be ungraded papers, an iPhone, etc.
Photoshop
Cropping in
All photos that go into the yearbook must be cropped before going into InDesign.
Flash
Lense
Shutter
Lense Release Button
command dial
viewfinder
shoe mount
trash button
playback button
multi selector
QUESTIONS!
What are 5 of the 10 Composition rules?
Do you want a high ISO or a low ISO in broad daylight?
Full transcript