Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The End of Science Fiction

No description
by

Ivan K

on 9 December 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The End of Science Fiction

"The End of Science Fiction"
By: Lisel Mueller

Author's Biographical Information
Although Lisel Mueller was born in Hamburg, Germany, she was force to move to America at the age of 15 by the Nazi party. She attended Evansville College and completed graduate studies at Indiana University. In the 1960s, she lived with her husband in Illinois, where they raised their family. As well as being a poet, she taught at University of Chicago, Elmhurst College, and Goddard College. She won the National Book Award in 1981, the Pulitzer price in 1997, the Carl Sandburg Award, and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Born in 1924, Lisel Mueller is still living today in Chicago.
Explication / paraphrase
"The End of Science Fiction"

First stanza: It has become reality that we as human beings have advanced so far in technology that we reached the moon, invented computers, and can destroy the world.

Second stanza: Time has become meaningless. We can prolonged our lives indefinitely with medical science and technology. We conformed to the society, making conversation so dull and tasteless. Because of this, we have stopped caring about other people's opinion.

Third stanza
"The End of Science Fiction"
Third stanza: We have exhausted our imagination, making science fiction extinct. We need to imagine something new. Maybe we can invent something as good as the dawn of human beings, a child savior, or the fantasy of a hero who saved his father. We can also invent a tale of how one man escaped using a spool of thread and heartlessly abandoned the woman who saved him.
"The End of Science Fiction"
This is not fantasy, this is our life.
We are the characters
who have invaded the moon,
who cannot stop their computers.
We are the gods who can unmake
the world in seven days.

Both hands are stopped at noon.
We are beginning to live forever,
in lightweight, aluminum bodies
with numbers stamped on our backs.
We dial our words like Muzak.
We hear each other through water.

The genre is dead. Invent something new.
Invent a man and a woman
naked in a garden,
invent a child that will save the world,
a man who carries his father
out of a burning city.
Invent a spool of thread
that leads a hero to safety,
invent an island on which he abandons
the woman who saved his life
with no loss of sleep over his betrayal.

Invent us as we were
before our bodies glittered
and we stopped bleeding:
invent a shepherd who kills a giant,
a girl who grows into a tree,
a woman who refuses to turn
her back on the past and is changed to salt,
a boy who steals his brother’s birthright
and becomes the head of a nation.
Invent real tears, hard love,
slow-spoken, ancient words,
difficult as a child’s
first steps across a room.
This is not fantasy, this is our life. Both hands are stopped at noon.
We are the characters We are beginning to live forever,
who have invaded the moon, in lightweight, aluminum bodies
who cannot stop their computers. with numbers stamped on our backs.
We are the gods who can unmake We dial our words like Muzak.
the world in seven days. We hear each other through water.
The genre is dead. Invent something new.
Invent a man and a woman
naked in a garden,
invent a child that will save the world,
a man who carries his father
out of a burning city.
Invent a spool of thread
that leads a hero to safety,
invent an island on which he abandons
the woman who saved his life
with no loss of sleep over his betrayal.
Fourth stanza
"The End of Science Fiction"
Fourth stanza: We can invent ourselves to be immortal. We can come up with an incredible story of a shepherd who defeated a giant, a myth of a girl who transformed into a tree, how a woman turned into salt, and the life story of a leader of Israel. We need to invent something personal from soft tears to hard love, which is as difficult as a child's first steps.
Invent us as we were
before our bodies glittered
and we stopped bleeding:
invent a shepherd who kills a giant,
a girl who grows into a tree,
a woman who refuses to turn
her back on the past and is changed to salt,
a boy who steals his brother’s birthright
and becomes the head of a nation.
Invent real tears, hard love,
slow-spoken, ancient words,
difficult as a child’s
first steps across a room.
Poetic Devices
Poem
Form
Rhyme Scheme
Repetition
Figurative Language
Speaker / characters
Tone
Theme
"The End of Science Fiction" by Lisel Mueller
4 stanzas; 36 lines
Free verse - no rhymes
"Invent" - "Invent something new. Invent a man and a woman... Invent a child... Invent a spool of thread"
Metaphor - "We are the gods who can unmake the world in seven days."
Simile - " Invent real tears, hard love, slow - spoken, ancient words, difficult as a child's first steps across a room." and " We dial our words like Muzak."
Possibly the author speaking for the collective human race
Reflective, observant, meditative, ironic
The theme of the poem is that we as a race are changing too fast. Reality have caught up with science fiction in terms of technology and medication. As a result, we have become complacent and not as creative. We need to think of something new or it is the end of science fiction.
Theme
The theme of the poem is that we as a race are changing too fast. Reality have caught up with science fiction in terms of technology and medication. As a result, we have become complacent, isolated, and not as creative. We need to think of something new or it is the end of science fiction. The author uses many references to historical writings to show how far we have moved from those times.
Poetic device
Imagery
Imagery - "a man who carries his father out of a burning city" (line 4 stanza 3)
"before our bodies glittered and we stopped bleeding" (line 2 stanza 4)
The most important elements of the poem are parallelism and allusions. In the first two stanzas, many sentences with similar structure started with "We are", referring to the human race. In the last two stanzas, similar sentences started with "Invent". Parallelism contributed to the rhythm and reflective mood. The author also used many Biblical and literary allusions to craft the theme. Among the biblical allusions are Adam & Eve, Jesus, David & the Goliath, Lot's wife, and Esau & Jacob. The poem also referred back to Aeneas from the works of Virgil, mythologies such as Apollo and Daphne, and Theseus and the Minotaur.
Full transcript