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Edgar Allan Poe:

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Skyler Wu

on 12 November 2015

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Transcript of Edgar Allan Poe:

Created By Skyler Wu
Annabel Lee
BY EDGAR ALLAN POE
(1) It was many and many a year ago,

In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of Annabel Lee;
(5) And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,


In this kingdom by the sea,
But we loved with a love that was more than love—
(10) I and my Annabel Lee—
With a love that the wingèd seraphs of Heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,

In this kingdom by the sea,
(15) A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling

My beautiful Annabel Lee;
So that her highborn kinsmen came
And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre
(20)
In this kingdom by the sea.

The angels, not half so happy in Heaven,
Went envying her and me—
Yes!—that was the reason (as all men know,

In this kingdom by the sea)
(25) That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.

But our love it was stronger by far than the love
Of those who were older than we—
Of many far wiser than we—
(30) And neither the angels in Heaven above
Nor the demons down under the sea
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul

Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;

For the moon never beams, without bringing me dreams
(35)
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And the stars never rise, but I feel the bright eyes
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride,
(40) In her sepulchre there by the sea—
In her tomb by the sounding sea.

"ANNABEL LEE" (1849)

(1) Because I feel that, in the Heavens above,
The angels, whispering to one another,
Can find, among their burning terms of love,
None so devotional as that of “Mother,”
(5) Therefore by that dear name I long have called you—
You who are more than mother unto me,
And fill my heart of hearts, where Death installed you
In setting my Virginia's spirit free.
My mother—my own mother, who died early,
(10) Was but the mother of myself; but you
Are mother to the one I loved so dearly,
And thus are dearer than the mother I knew
By that infinity with which my wife
Was dearer to my soul than its soul-life.

"To My Mother"
(1) Once it
smiled a silent
dell
Where the people did not dwell;
They had gone unto the wars,
Trusting to the mild-eyed stars,
(5) Nightly, from their azure towers,
To keep watch above the flowers,
In the midst of which all day
The red sun-
light lazily lay.
Now each visitor shall confess
(10) The sad valley’s restlessness.
Nothing there is motionless —
Nothing save the airs that brood
Over the magic solitude.
Ah, by no wind are stirred those trees
(15) That palpitate
like the chill seas
Around the misty Hebrides!
Ah, by no wind those clouds are driven
That rustle through the unquiet Heaven
Uneasily, from morn till even,
(20) Over the violets there that lie
In myriad types of the human eye —
Over three lilies there that wave
And weep above a nameless grave!
They wave: — from out their fragrant tops
(25) Eternal dews come down in drops.
They weep: — from off their delicate stems
Perennial tears descend in gems.
"The Valley of Unrest (1831)"
(1) Fair river! in thy bright, clear flow
Of crystal, wandering water,
Thou art an emblem of the glow
Of beauty--the unhidden heart--
(5) The
playful maziness of art
In old Alberto's daughter;
But when within thy wave she looks--
Which glistens then, and
trembles
--
Why, then, the prettiest of brooks
(10) Her worshipper resembles;
For in his heart, as in thy stream,
Her image deeply lies--
His heart which
trembles at the beam
Of
her soul-searching eyes
.
"To the River"
Edgar Allan Poe
A Synopsis of Edgar Allan Poe's Biography and Style:
In conclusion...
Thank You For Watching!
"ANNABEL LEE" (1849)
"ANNABEL LEE" (1849)
"To the River"

Because I feel that, in the Heavens above,
(11 syllables)
The angels, whispering to one another,
(11 syllables)
Can find, among their burning terms of love,
(10 syllables)
None so devotional as that of “Mother,” (
11 syllables)
Therefore by that dear name I long have called you—
(10 syllables)
You who are more than mother unto me,
(10 syllables)
And fill my heart of hearts, where Death installed you
(11 syllables)
In setting my Virginia's spirit free.
(10 syllables)
My mother—my own mother, who died early,
(11 syllables)
Was but the mother of myself; but you (
10 syllables)
Are mother to the one I loved so dearly,
(11 syllables)
And thus are dearer than the mother I knew
(11 syllables)
By that infinity with which my wife
(10 syllables)
Was dearer to my soul than its soul-life.
(10 syllables)

"To My Mother"

"The Valley of Unrest"
January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849

“The death of a beautiful woman is the most poetic topic in the world,”

lived a life of alcoholism and depression

Widely regarded for his haunting lyrical poetry, and classic horror
Stanza 1
Stanza 2
Stanza 3
Stanza 4
Stanza 5
Stanza 6
REPITITION!
-
Beautiful Annabel Lee
-
Kingdom by the Sea
Annabel Lee
BY EDGAR ALLAN POE
(1) It was many and many a year ago,

In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of Annabel Lee;
(5) And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea,
But we loved with a love that was more than love—
(10) I and my Annabel Lee—
With a love that the wingèd seraphs of Heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,
In this kingdom by the sea,
(15) A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling
My beautiful Annabel Lee;
So that her highborn kinsmen came
And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre
(20) In this kingdom by the sea.

The angels, not half so happy in Heaven,
Went envying her and me—
Yes!—that was the reason (as all men know,
In this kingdom by the sea)
(25) That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.

But our love it was stronger by far than the love
Of those who were older than we—
Of many far wiser than we—
(30) And neither the angels in Heaven above
Nor the demons down under the sea
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;

For the moon never beams, without bringing me dreams
(35) Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And the stars never rise, but I feel the bright eyes
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride,
(40) In her sepulchre there by the sea—
In her tomb by the sounding sea.

Rhyme:

A
B
A
B

B


B

B

B

A
B

B

B

B


B

B

B

C
B
B
C
B

B


B

B
D
D
B
B
-The Sound "E" is repeated in nearly every other line.
-Other sounds are sporadically repeated, but with no definite pattern
Annabel Lee
BY EDGAR ALLAN POE
(1) It was many and many a year ago,(11 syllables)
In a kingdom by the sea, (7 syllables)
That a maiden there lived whom you may know (10 syllables)
By the name of Annabel Lee; (8 syllables)
(5) And this maiden she lived with no other thought (11 syllables)
Than to love and be loved by me. (8 syllables)

I was a child and she was a child, (9 syllables)
In this kingdom by the sea, (7 syllables)
But we loved with a love that was more than love— (11 syllables)
(10) I and my Annabel Lee— (7 syllables)
With a love that the wingèd seraphs of Heaven (11 syllables)
Coveted her and me.
(6 syllables)

And this was the reason that, long ago,
(10 syllables)
In this kingdom by the sea, (7 syllables)
(15) A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling (9 syllables)
My beautiful Annabel Lee;
(8 syllables)
So that her highborn kinsmen came
(8 syllables)
And bore her away from me,(7 syllables)
To shut her up in a sepulchre (9 syllables)
(20) In this kingdom by the sea. (7 syllables)

The angels, not half so happy in Heaven,(11 syllables)
Went envying her and me— (7 syllables)
Yes!—that was the reason (as all men know,
(10 syllables)
In this kingdom by the sea) (7 syllables)
(25) That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
(10 syllables)
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.
(10 syllables)

But our love it was stronger by far than the love
(12 syllables)
Of those who were older than we—
(8 syllables)
Of many far wiser than we—
(8 syllables)
(30) And neither the angels in Heaven above (11 syllables)
Nor the demons down under the sea (9 syllables)
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul (11 syllables)
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee; (9 syllables)

For the moon never beams, without bringing me dreams (12 syllables)
(35) Of the beautiful Annabel Lee; (9 syllables)
And the stars never rise, but I feel the bright eyes (12 syllables)
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee; (9 syllables)
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side (12 syllables)
Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride, (12 syllables)
(40) In her sepulchre there by the sea— (9 syllables)
In her tomb by the sounding sea. (8 syllables)

Stanza 1
Stanza 2
Stanza 3
Stanza 4
Stanza 5
Stanza 6
Meter:
-Instances of meter occur sporadically throughtout the bulk of the poem, but have no definite pattern.
-However, the last stanza with its suspicious grouping of 12 syllable lines is made up of anapests (2 stressed, 1 unstressed.
-The first stanza also contains anapest, followed by iamb

Stanza 1
Stanza 2
Stanza 3
Stanza 4
Stanza 5
Stanza 6
Stanza 1
*The Whole Poem is a Metaphor!
A
B
A
B
C
D
C
D
D
C
D
C
E
E
Rhyme:
-Plenty of Rhyme, in an ABAB pattern per every four lines,barring the last two lines.
-ubiquitous usage of the "U" sound
Stanza 1
Syllables:
-The bulk of the poem is comprised of lines ocsillating between 11 and 10 syllables, without any trace of a specific meter pattern.
A
A
B
B
C
C
D
D
E
E
E
F
F
G
G
G
H
H
H
I
I
J
J
K
K
L
L
Stanza 1
Once again, Edgar Allan Poe uses a rather consipicuous rhyme scheme.
-Consecutive couplets and/or triplets maintain a rhyme pattern
Sporadic Alliteration
A Lone Simile
(1) Once it smiled a silent dell
(7 syllables)
Where the people did not dwell;
(7 syllables)
They had gone unto the wars,
(7 syllables)
Trusting to the mild-eyed stars,
(7 syllables)
(5) Nightly, from their azure towers,
(7 syllables)
To keep watch above the flowers,
(7 syllables)
In the midst of which all day
(7 syllables)
The red sun-light lazily lay.
(8 syllables)
Now each visitor shall confess
(8 syllables)
(10) T
he sad valley’s restlessness
.
(7 syllables)
Nothing there is motionless —
(7 syllables)
Nothing save
the airs that brood
(
7 syllables)
Over the magic solitude.
(8 syllables)
Ah, by no wind are stirred those trees
(8 syllables)
(15)
That palpitate
like the chill seas
(8 syllables)
Around the misty Hebrides!
(7 syllables)
Ah, by no wind those clouds are driven
(9 syllables)
That rustle through the unquiet Heaven (
10 syllables)
Uneasily, from morn till even,
(9 syllables)
(20) Over the violets there that lie
(8 syllables)
In myriad types of the human eye —
(9 syllables)
Over three lilies there
that wave

(8 syllables)
And weep
above a nameless grave!
(8 syllables)
T
hey wave
: — from out their fragrant tops
(8 syllables)
(25) Eternal dews come down in drops.
(8 syllables)
They weep
: — from off their delicate stems
(9 syllables)
Perennial tears descend in gems.
(8 syllables)
Syllables:
-meter wise, there are no lasting signs of meter, but the syllables start off at 7 per line and slowly oscillate up to 10 before dropping back to 9 per line.
Poe uses many instances of personification. He personifies the lilies, the winds, and the valley itself, giving them humanlike actions and feelings. In fact, it is debateable that the whole poem is merely extended personification
Stanza 1
A
B
A
C
C
B
D
E
D
E
F
G
F
Stanza 1
The whole poem is personfication. Poe personifies the river as trembling and with eyes. He also personifies art
Like Poe's previous poems, "To the River" is full of rhyme, but does not have a definite pattern.
(1) Fair river! in thy bright, clear flow
(8 syllables)

Of crystal, wandering water, (
8 syllables)
Thou art an emblem of the glow
(8 syllables)
Of beauty--the unhidden heart--
(8 syllables)
(5) The playful maziness of art (
8 syllables)
In old Alberto's daughter;
(7 syllables)
But when within thy wave she looks--
(8 syllables)
Which glistens then, and trembles--
(7 syllables)
Why, then, the prettiest of brooks
(8 syllables)
(10) Her worshipper resembles;
(7 syllables)
For in his heart, as in thy stream,
(8 syllables)
Her image deeply lies--
(6 syllables)
His heart which trembles at the beam
(8 syllables)
Of her soul-searching eyes.
(6 syllables)
Doing a brief syllable analysis, we discover that the majority of the lines contain meter. However, there is no definite, consistent mode (e.g. iamb, anapest, dactyl, troche).
Stanza 1
(1)For her this rhyme is penned, whose luminous eyes,
Brightly expressive
as the

twins of Lœda,
Shall find her own sweet name, that, nestling lies
Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader.
(5)Search narrowly the lines! — they hold a treasure
Divine — a talisman — an amulet
That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure —
The words — the syllables! Do not forget
The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor!
(10)And yet there is in this no
Gordian knot
Which one might not undo without a sabre,
If one could merely comprehend the plot.
Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering
Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus
(15)Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing
Of poets, by poets — as the name is a poet’s, too.
Its letters, although naturally lying
Like the

knight Pinto — Mendez Ferdinando —
Still form a synonym for Truth. — Cease trying!
(20)You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do.


Stanza 1
"A Valentine"
Poe uses allusion, or referencing other distant ideas or objects. In this case, he alludes to "Twins of Loeda", a constellation, Gordian's Knot, a mythological story, and the Knight Pinto, a literary figure who was known for his falsehoods.
In order to connect the two allusions to the poem, Poe uses similes in lines 2 and 18.
(1)For her this rhyme is penned, whose luminous eyes,
(11 syllables)
Brightly expressive as the twins of Lœda,
(11 syllables)
Shall find her own sweet name, that, nestling lies
(10 syllables)
Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader.
(11 syllables)
(5)Search narrowly the lines! — they hold a treasure
(11 syllables)
Divine — a talisman — an amulet
(10 syllables)
That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure —
(11 syllables)
The words — the syllables! Do not forget
(10 syllables)
The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor!
(12 syllables)
(10)And yet there is in this no Gordian knot
(10 syllables)
Which one might not undo without a sabre,
(11 syllables)
If one could merely comprehend the plot.
(10 syllables)
Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering
(12 syllables)
Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus
(10 syllables)
(15)Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing
(12 syllables)
Of poets, by poets — as the name is a poet’s, too.
(11 syllables)
Its letters, although naturally lying
(10 syllables)
Like the knight Pinto — Mendez Ferdinando —
(11 syllables)
Still form a synonym for Truth. — Cease trying!
(11 syllables)
(20)You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do. (15)


"A Valentine"
Stanza 1
Meter occurs occasionally, with no definite pattern. Although the first 6 lines show a 11-11-10, 11-11-10 pattern, though that may be unintentional
*Note: The first letter of the first line, second letter of the second line, etc., spell "Frances Sargent Osgood", the Valentine.
Edgar Allan Poe is a very skillful poet.

He enjoys:
-intentionally setting very conspicuous rhyming patterns

-using allusion for a nice twist ("A Valentine")

-using roughly the same number of syllables per line, give or take 1 or 2 syllables

-he doesn't usually imput lyrical feet, but uses them rather obviously in "Annabel Lee"
(1)For her this rhyme is penned, whose luminous eyes,
Brightly expressive as the twins of Lœda,
Shall find her own sweet name, that, nestling lies
Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader.
(5)Search narrowly the lines! — they hold a treasure
Divine — a talisman — an amulet
That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure —
The words — the syllables! Do not forget
The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor!
(10)And yet there is in this no Gordian knot
Which one might not undo without a sabre,
If one could merely comprehend the plot.
Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering
Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus
(15)Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing
Of poets, by poets — as the name is a poet’s, too.
Its letters, although naturally lying
Like the knight Pinto — Mendez Ferdinando —
Still form a synonym for Truth. — Cease trying!
(20)You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do.


"A Valentine"
A

A

B
C
B
C
D
E
D
E
F

F
G
F

F
G
Stanza 1
Not unlike the majority of his other poems, Edgar Allan Poe once again employs rhyme, but without a definite sequence.
Full transcript