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Research 101: Citing Your Sources Parts I and II

Plagiarism Explanation for Research Papers
by

Caitlin Skinner

on 8 January 2014

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Transcript of Research 101: Citing Your Sources Parts I and II

This is the beginning of the
second half
of note-taking:
parts III and IV. Please take
notes and then complete the
two writing strategies
exercises I have prepared for you,
to practice what you've learned.
Many thanks to:
Kathryn Fitzgerald's
"Cite it Right" Prezi
for much information
and inspiration (April 2011)
Research 101: Citing your Sources
Each citation for a source at the end of a paper includes the following (when these elements can be found):
Author information
Title information (article or chapter)
Major title information (book or journal/magazine)
Publication Date (including journal volume/issue)
Page numbers from beginning to end of article or chapter
Whether the piece was found on the web or printed
An entire website:
THE BASICS
MLA requires 1) the author's last name, and 2) the page number, for any quote or paraphrase from a source.
EXAMPLE: "this is my quote" (Skinner 208).
if the source has no author, use a shortened version of the source's title
EXAMPLE: "this is my quote" ("Teacher Tale" 208)
if the source has no page number, don't use it.
WAYS TO INCORPORATE:
1. use a simple introductory phrase, such as:
According to Bradbury, the most important part of literature is its "texture" (81).

2. use an independent clause and a colon:
Beatty thinks books cause strife. Meanwhile, Faber believes that books "show the pores of life" (Bradbury 81).

3. incorporate the quote into your sentence:
Faber believes it is these 'pores' that are necessary for making us consider how life could be better (Bradbury 81).
Part One:
Why Citing is So Important

Part Two:
Citing Rules

Part Three: MLA
Internet Sources
"If I have seen further, it is only by standing on the shoulders of giants."
Sample Works Cited Page
-- Isaac Newton

1. It makes your argument stronger, because you are building off other experts' research.

2. It keeps you honest -- you're not stealing someone else's hard work.
Citations help your AUDIENCE because:

1. They know YOU know what you're talking about.

2. They can go back and retrace your research steps -- looking at your sources -- to learn more.
KEY IDEA 1: GIVING CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE
KEY IDEA 2: LEAVING A TRAIL FOR OTHER READERS
You MUST cite sources when doing research because:
What's the big idea?
AVOIDING
PLAGIARISM
PLAGIARISM
Definition:
Stealing someone else's work or ideas without giving them proper credit.
Types:
1. Direct:
Buying a paper
Using a friend's
Copying entire sentences or phrases of another source -- published or on the internet
2. Mosaic Plagiarism:
mixing copied phrases or even just words in with your own work
3. Improper paraphrasing or summarizing:
putting an author's ideas into your own words without giving the author proper credit
Information largely taken directly from Kathryn Fitzgerald's "Cite it Right" Prezi, and adapted/added to for high school usage
If the source says:
And you WRITE:
example from K. Fitzgerald
example of direct plagiarism:
example of mosaic plagiarism
If the source says:
And you write:
example from K. Fitzgerald
all text highlighted is exact, or almost exact, phrase as original text.

the re-write version also says the information in almost the exact same order.
example of improper paraphrasing:
if the source says:
and you write:
you've put the source into your own words, but you didn't CITE it by saying where you got this information.
example from K. Fitzgerald
In all cases,
IGNORANCE is NOT an EXCUSE
--saying you "didn't know" that you couldn't do that won't save you from:
failed grades
being kicked out of college
being fired
being sued
(these are just a few possible consequences)
HOW TO AVOID IT:
1. Know when and how to cite sources
2. Know where to get help when you're confused
3. Develop good research note-taking practices NOW**
WHAT:
published materials (books, articles, movies...)
statistics or data
lectures or what a teacher said
emails, letters, phone calls, interviews
other students' work
WHERE:
in-text citations AND
bibliography or works cited at end of paper
thanks to k. fitzgerald for these outlines
Format of an MLA book Citation
Author Lastname
,
Firstname
.
Title
(italics or underlined)
.
City-of-publication
:
Publisher
,
Date-Published
.
Format of an MLA Article Citation:
Author Lastname, Firstname. "Title of
Author Lastname, Firstname. "Title of
Article." Title of Journal - Italics. Volume (date): Page numbers.
Article." Title of Journal-Italics. Volume (date): Page numbers. Online Source-Italics. Web. Date You got it from the source.
in print:
on web:
Also note: this prezi requires sound, so grab some headphones!
example:
An article from an online newspaper:
example:
Other:
Interviews:
How to Cite Within a Text
FOR MORE INFORMATION
Complete the activity and assessment I have for you in class, entitled
OTHER IMPORTANT RULES
Ex: Bradbury's first impression was about fire, since he opens his novel with, "It was a pleasure to burn" (3).
If you use the author's name in the introduction to the quote, you do not need to put it in parenthesis after the quote:
You should NEVER introduce a quote in the following ways:
don't mention a page number:
"on page ___, it says ..."
don't say "quote":
"because the quote says"
or
"in the quote"
don't plug a quote into your paper without explaining it.
Quotes should only take up about 10% of your paper. If you have more than that, you should re-write or summarize some of the quotes in your own words. But you still have to cite author and page number!
"Paper-Writing Skills: Quoting Others"
AND
"Paper-Writing Skills: Using In-text Citations"
OR
http://citationmachine.net/index2.php?reqstyleid=1&newstyle=1&stylebox=1
The "Son of Citation Machine" website will help create a citation for your Works Cited/Bibliography for any source that you have.
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/11/
For any other citation questions or help, go to Purdue OWL:
If you use a source more than once, you need to reintroduce the source, and cite it in parenthesis afterward whenever the reader might be confused about where the quote is from.
In other words, two quotes in the same paragraph, from the same character, in the same book, may not need to be re-introduced or cited twice.
This ends note-taking for parts I and II. Please stop until you have completed the first plagiarism assessment.
A FANTASTIC new site
called "Diigo" allows you
to search the internet, highlight facts you find and make notes about them, and SAVE the sites in your own personal virtual library.

This site is amazing, and replaces the 20th century method of writing things down on notecards to keep track of which facts came from which source. Now, you can return to your library and quickly find out.
Full transcript