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Poetry Terms

Introduction to Poetry Terms
by

Elizabeth Glenn

on 3 February 2011

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Transcript of Poetry Terms

Poetry 1. A type of literature in which words are arranged to create a certain effect. Also called "Verse" PROSE Opposite of verse; prose is every day speech. Prose: As much as I like the Steelers, I think it is time someone else won the Super Bowl.

Verse:
Though second in my team of choice
Mad love for Steel have I
I think it time for another voice
Let's give the Packers a try Verse A line of poetry This Be The Verse - Phillip Larkin
They **** you up, your mum and dad.
They may not mean to, but they do.
They fill you with the faults they had
And add some extra, just for you.

But they were **** up in their turn
By fools in old-style hats and coats,
Who half the time were soppy-stern
And half at one another's throats.

Man hands on misery to man.
It deepens like a coastal shelf.
Get out as early as you can,
And don't have any kids yourself. All poetry is written in verse Reading a poem, too, is different from reading prose; it is an experience that involves all the senses.
As a French poet once said,
“Prose is walking, poetry is dancing.” Speaker vs. Author In poetry the speaker is the voice that “talks” to the reader.
The author is the person who wrote that particular literary work.


The speaker and author can be the same person, but often they are two different people.

Example: "To An Athlete Dying Young" by A.E. Housman.
Author: A.E. Housman
Speaker: A Person in the athlete's town. Form The form of a poem is the physical arrangement of the words on the page Form can be as basic as the traditional structure of a poem..... Or, it can refer to a more specific structure.... Haiku
when haiku come down
we mess around town, feelin
then, damn, haiku walks A japanese poem of 3 lines with a pattern of 5-7-5 syllables. Falling to the ground,

I watch a leaf settle down

In a bed of brown. Sometimes a poem takes the form of what it describes Stanza Poems, like songs are organized in stanzas
Stanzas: Lines of poems that are grouped together. They are usually grouped by rhyme, repetition and sound devices
The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the differenceRobert Frost

-Robert Frost Free verse is poetry that does not follow any strict poetic or grammatical rules.
Free Verse He never learned a trade, he just sells gas,
Checks oil, and changes flats. Once in a while,
As a gag, he dribbles an inner tube,
But most of us remember anyway.
His hands are fine and nervous on the lug wrench.
It makes no difference to the lug wrench, though.

"Ex Basketball Player Smart lad, to slip betimes away
From fields where glory does not stay,
And early though the laurel grows
It withers quicker than the rose.

"To An Athlete Dying Young" Which is free verse? Sound Devices Poets use a variety of techniques to produce special qualities of sound.
Alliteration Is the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words.
Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Peppers

“to jiggle and jump for joy”

Sally sells seashells by the seashore
The repetition of internal vowel sounds in a words that do not rhyme
Assonance The repetition of internal vowel sounds in a words that do not rhyme
“Sea” and “Heat”
“Glorious” and “Morning”
“Late” and “Rain”
“a greed as deep as the sea”
Consonance Is the repetition of consonant sounds within or at the end of words “fleet foot”
“sound mind”
Rhyme Is a repetition of final sounds in two or more words
A stray gray tray
Breath death
Bone Alone
Scheme A rhyme scheme is a pattern of rhymes at the ends of lines in a poem
The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the differenceRobert Frost

-Robert Frost Betty Botter bought some butter,
But, she said, The butter's bitter;
If I put it in my batter
It will make my batter bitter.
But, a bit of better butter
Will make my batter better.

So, she bought a bit of butter
Better than her bitter butter,
And she put it in her batter
And the batter was not bitter.
So, 'twas better Betty Botter
Bought a bit of better butter.


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