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Present perfect simple

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by

Ana Soriano

on 25 November 2015

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Transcript of Present perfect simple

Present perfect
We use the PRESENT PERFECT SIMPLE to talk about:
And there's more:
There are some expressions that we use with present perfect:
Let's see with examples:
Present perfect simple
vs.
Present perfect continuous

Let's put it into practice
Work in pairs.
Think of two possible answers
to the comments below,
one with p.p. simple and one with p.p. continuous:
actions that started in the past and continue into the present
actions that happened in a period of time which has not finished
actions that happened in the past and have a result in the present
actions that happened in the past but the time when they happened is not said or is not important
actions that
started in the past
and continue into the present
I've lived here all my life
actions that happened
in a period of time
which has not finished
I've worked a lot this week
We use expressions of time such as
this year, this month, today...
actions that happened in the past
and have a result in the present
My computer has crashed.
I can't send you my CV by email.
They have improved this concert hall, the seats are more comfortable now.
actions that happened in the past
but the time when they happened
is not said or is not important
I've been to Rome, it's a beautiful city
Have you ever written a blog?
I've bought a new car!
-You look exhausted!
-I've been working really hard in the garden the whole morning.
-I haven't slept for two days, I had to study for the exam
You look exhausted!
Why are your eyes so red?
Your shoes are really dirty
How come are you so wet?
You've got tomato sauce on your shirt.
You look really worried.
You are hot, are you ok?
Questions with
How long...?
We can use:
for
+a period of time
since
+the point in time when the action started
With
already
and
yet
, to express if the action is finished (or not)
I've already cleaned the house
I haven't cooked dinner yet
I have lived in London
for the last two years
I've lived in London
since I finished university
With superlatives
With the expressions
It's the first, the second, the last time, etc.
She's the best teacher I have had
It's the last time I have come to this restaurant, it's horrible!
With
just
, to indicate the recentness of the action
-Would you like a cup of coffee?
-No thanks, we have just had one.
And what about the
present perfect continuous?

The PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS is used in very similar ways to the present perfect simple
What's the difference then?
to emphasize the action or the
duration
of the action, we use the CONTINUOUS form
to emphasize the
result
of an action, we use the SIMPLE form
to talk about completed actions (
already
and
yet
), we use the SIMPLE form
with superlatives, and the expressions
it's the first time...
, we use the SIMPLE form
CONTINUOUS
SIMPLE
We've painted the kitchen
We have been painting the kitchen
I've been travelling for six months
I've visited eight countries
with unfinished actions expressed by action verbs
with unfinished actions expressed by non-action or stative verbs
I've known her since we were at school
We've been going to the same gym since we met
with the verbs live and work we often use the continuous form for shorter temporary actions
We have always worked for the same company. Actually, we have been working in the same project lately.
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