Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Logical Fallacies

No description
by

Adam Hoss

on 11 April 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Logical Fallacies

People admire Ashton Kutcher because he is a well-known actor. However, he is probably not an expert on photography or cameras.


Logical Fallacies
This shows the fallacy by the boy believing since the first three were true the fourth must have been false, this is wrong as there is a 50/50 chance on every true or false question. The same goes for the coin as he believes since the first 3 were heads, the last one had to be tails, again there is a 50/50 chance every time.
A logical fallacy is a flaw in reasoning. Logical fallacies are like tricks or illusions of thought, and they're often very sneakily used by politicians and the media to fool people. Don't be fooled! In addition to chapter 8 of your textbook and our PowerPoint, here's a great website for more information on logical fallacies: https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/
(note that some of the vocabulary might be different)

Non Sequitur
Example (do not change)
Appeal to Tradition
I don't want more than one group doing the same fallacy. Here is a list of some common fallacies. If you choose one of these, please delete it from the list. Feel free to look up something not on the list. There are hundreds of fallacies
Name of Fallacy
Burden of Proof
Gambler's Fallacy
Instructions: Find an example of a logical fallacy, then fill in the template with your information and present it to the class
A non sequitur is Latin for "it does not follow." In logic, it is a type of argument in which the conclusion does not follow from the premise. In other words, the support given does not actually support the claim. It is a nonsense argument; it just doesn't make sense.
An example would be "We need tougher laws on gun control because a new exo-planet was recently discovered in our solar system." This argument takes two reasonable statements that have nothing to do with each other and attempts to draw a correlation.
In this video, MSNBC talk show host Chris Matthews is discussing Hilary Clinton's victory over Barack Obama in the New Hampshire primary election in 2008. He says that the only reason Clinton is a front-runner in the race for president is because her husband (former President Bill Clinton) had an affair. These two statements (that she is a frontrunner and that Mr. Clinton had an affair) are both true and reasonable to say, but they don't necessarily have anything to do with one another. Hence, it does not follow.
This video is an example of an Appeal to Tradition fallacy because Arm & Hammer is saying that the reason their product is the best is because it has been used for generations. In the commercial, it says to ask your mom and grandma about Arm & Hammer because they used the same product, and therefore it must work.
Appeal to Authority Fallacy
This fallacy involves using someone that people look up to for the purpose of advertising a product or point of view. This person is usually not an expert on the argument being presented.
Ad Hominem
The Gambler's fallacy is simply the belief that past outcomes of events will influence an event within the present.
Explain your fallacy in your own words in this box (just click and type)
Explain how the video we just watched is an example of your fallacy, giving any needed background information.
Explain your fallacy in your own words in this box (just click and type)
The Texas Sharpshooter fallacy is made when differences in data are ignored or not included. The similarities are stressed. The conclusion is then taken falsely. This fallacy is also called Cherry Picking because someone picks out only what they want to say to make the argument look better.
Texas sharpshooter



Use the Insert menu at the top of the screen to insert a YouTube video inside this box
Make up your own example of your fallacy and write it here
Name of Fallacy
Guilt By Association
Maggie and Natalie
Ava and Makenzie
Katie and Alexa
Dan, Pat and Zach
Matt and Dan
Joy and Melinda
Names here
An Appeal to Tradition fallacy presents an argument to look correct just because it is a tradition or was popular in the past.
Explain how the video we just watched is an example of your fallacy, giving any needed background information.
This video only shows the opinions of the people who don't like Todd Akin. They ignore the opinions of the people who have something good to say about him. The video picks out the people who agree with their argument and do not include the people that go against their argument.
Find a video example of your fallacy on YouTube and place the video in this box
Appeal to Tradition
Find a video example of your fallacy on YouTube and place the video in this box
Straw Man
This video occurs before Rubio and Christie dropped out of the presidential race. Chris Christie repeatedly refers to Marco Rubio as "the boy in the bubble." Christie claims that Rubio has "never done anything in his life," and that he never answers anybody's questions. Christie makes personal attacks rather than attacking Rubio's record or policies.
Confusing Cause and Effect
Slippery Slope
Red Herring
False Dilemma
Appeal to Tradition
Use the Insert menu at the top of the screen to insert a YouTube video inside this box
Use the Insert menu at the top of the screen to insert a YouTube video inside this box
Make up your own example of your fallacy and write it here
An example would be the belief that a baseball batter with a .333 average has a better chance of getting a hit one at bat because he struck out the previous at bat. This is wrong because since he has a .333 average he has a %33 chance at a hit every time up to bat.
A moderator asks Mr. Trump, "How will you 'Make America Great Again?'"
Mr. Trump responds, "By getting your ugly face out of my country!"
Mark Hamill says guns are bad. Therefore, guns must be bad.
An example would be "Men should be the sole provider of families and make the most money because that is how it has always been." This argument is saying that this is the way things should be just because that is how it has always been.
Find a video example of your fallacy on YouTube and place the video in this box
Attacking someone with direct personal insults instead of attacking them based on factual evidence.
"My boss gives us Sundays off for family time and gives us a raise when we work hard. Therefore, he is a great person." This quote only mentions two examples of the boss being a good person. We don't know all of the other actions of the boss.
Full transcript