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Greek Architecture

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Lux Wettex

on 16 September 2014

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Transcript of Greek Architecture

Greek Architecture
Doric Order
In their original Greek version, Doric columns stood directly on the flat pavement (the stylobate) of a temple without a base; their vertical shafts were fluted with 20 parallel concave grooves; and they were topped by a smooth capital that flared from the column to meet a square abacus at the intersection with the horizontal beam (architrave) that they carried. The Parthenon has the Doric design columns. It was most
popular in the Archaic
Period(750-480 BC) inmainland
Greece. The Doric
has abasis of sturdy male
body proportions
Ionic Order
The Ionic order originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia, the southwestern coastland and islands of Asia Minor settled by Ionian Greeks, where an Ionian dialect was spoken. The Ionic order column was being practiced in mainland Greece in the 5th century BC. It was most popular in the Archaic Period (750-480 BC)
in Ionia. Ionic depends on
"more graceful" female
body proportions.
Temple of the Delians(Doric)
Temple Rievaulx(Ionic)
Maison Carrée (Corinthian)
Architecture
Corinthian Order
Group
Lucas Anquela
Juan Molouny
Lucas Portieri
Marcos Racimo
The name "Corinthian" is derived from the Greek city of Corinth, although the order first appeared used externally at Athens. Although of Greek origin, the Corinthian order was actually seldom used in Greek architecture. It came into its own in Roman practice, following precedents set by the Temple of Mars Ultor in the Forum of Augustus. Proportion is a defining characteristic of the Corinthian order: the "coherent integration of dimensions and ratios in accordance with the principles of symmetria"
Ancient Greek architecture is distinguished by its highly formalised characteristics, both of structure and decoration. This is particularly so in the case of temples where each building appears to have been conceived as a sculptural entity within the landscape, most often raised on high ground so that the elegance of its proportions and the effects of light on its surfaces might be viewed from all angles. The three main styles were: Doric order-Ionic order-Corinthian order
Greek Materials
The most common material for construction in the Ancient Greece were marble, limestone, bronze, bricks, wood, terracotta and the adobe was also used but for poor constructions
Marble
Limestone
Bronze
Bricks
Wood
Terracotta
Full transcript